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EXPERT ADVICE AND TIPS FOR EVERY AMIGA ENTHUSIAST^ jg^ 




From the makers of Amiga Format 

ISSUE 1 9 NOVEMBER 1 992 £ 1 .50 
YOUR DEFINITIVE AMIGA GUIDE 








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!t\>Si »W.w\i \VA%iV. W-vVt-S T\w ». iYrw W\ 



z U«*-Yo«:w.V 





How to make the most of your Amig 
unique operating system 

Multitasking: Page 84 



Could you and your scanner benefit from 
optica] tharatter recognition software? 

DTP: Page 74 



Nineteen pages of handy advice to stop 
those niggles turning into nightmares 

Amiga Answers: Page 39 Jk I 



4// the very latest low-tost and no-tost 
software from the Amiga publit domain 

PD: Page 156 




^^^\ 




MICROSOFT 

iNPOWS 



fersion 3. 



"EST* you the on 
This is the future 

What's in store for your Amiga? 

OUR EXPERT PANEL PREDICTS THE NEW POWER GENERATION 



t Corporation 

'-fit? R' wi 




uiure 

runs Hi KG 



Your guarantee of value 



770961 "730025 



AS photographs are of actual DGV screens. 




Now 

Available 

in PAL 



The Future Is Here! 

A Paint, digitize and display beautiful full color composite video images on 
any Amiga. 3 " 

A Capture an image in 10 seconds from any color video camera. (Also works 
with still video cameras, video disk and still frame capable VCR's.) 

A Convert DGV™ images to or from any IFF display format (including HAM 
and 24 bit). 

A Full-featured paint, digitize and conversion software are included. DCT\T 
is a complete system, right out of the box! 

A Create spectacular 3D images and animations. Compatible with all popular 
3D programs. 



Create beautiful full color video images 
with all popular Amiga 3D programs. 





opts| source ivn'il 5C _? ,,E,, o*l*tr* 



I DIGITIZE 
If L«M 



«5°J ■„„»;„, ii^rJ 

SflL'E ltd -i 



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"BBBtj tu>tr 



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Digitize and process full color composite 
video images in millions of colors. 




rmiir cri- a x * ■■ -..ci' ■•n 'i-.i ••■■■« 

too *Q' < *»»« imi.ru.ii tim« # _ 



i mmhBmSI 



LOUP, Bftl'C COAO' fiftl'E LMID SULt LOAO'ffM'C 1 



Sophisticated true color video paint, 
digitizing and image processing soft- 
ware are all combined into one easy to 
use package. 





Animate video quality DGV images in 
real time using popular Amiga animation 
creation tools. 

DCTV (Digital Composite Television) is a 
revolutionary new compressed video 
display and digitizing system for the 
Amiga. Using the Amiga as a com- 
pressed video buffer, DCTV creates a 
color composite video display with 
all the color and resolution of television. 



Telephone 916/344-4825 FAX 916/635-0475 

1992 Digital Cieotions. Amiga ti o registered trademark of Commodore Buiine» Moctiinei. Potenli applied lor. 



WELCOME 



mm 


> 


AT A GLANCE 




GUIDE 




To help you find what you want 


quickly and easily, this is a cross- 


referenced list of all the products 


and subjects covered in this 




month's Amiga Shopper. The 




subjects covered in Amiga Answers 


are detailed on page 39; the many 


PD programs covered on page 156 


are listed there. The page numbers 


given are for the first page of the 


article in which the product is 




mentioned. 




A4000 


7 


Amiga Answers 


39 


Amiga bundles 


8 


Amiga debate 


15 


Amiga DOS 


90 


AMOS 


110 


ARexx 


88 


Artificial Intelligence 


154 


Bulletin boards 


106 


Buying advice 


167 


C programming 


86 


Chaos 


82 


Chroma keying 


71 


Comms 


106 


Competition 


170 


Consoles 


34 


Desktop publishing 


74 


Director 2 


70 


Eclectic startup-sequence 


90 


Education 


145 


For sale 


148 


Future Entertainment Show 10 


128 


Letters 


13 


Linear programming 


139 


Listings 


134 


Mail Order 


117 


Multitasking 


84 


Music 


98 


News 


7 


Optical Character Recognition 


74 


Pascal 


79 


PC emulators 


23 


Platinum Works 


139 


Product Locator 


168 


Programming 86, 88, 110 


152 


Public Domain 


156 


Reader ads 


148 


Sequencing 


98 


Shareware 


156 


Subscriptions 


124 


Talking Shop 


13 


Talking Shop Special 


15 


User groups 


150 


Video 


70 


Are there any products 


or 


subjects you'd like us 


to 


take a look at? Well, just 


drop a line to: 




Amiga Shopper, 




30, Monmouth Street 


9 


Bath BA1 2BW. 





WELCOME 



This month we've decided to have a long 
look at the current state of the Amiga 
range and judge not only its potential, but 
also the threat from the PC and consoles 
markets squeezing it from both sides. 

So, besides a big round-up of PC emulators 
and a look at how console graphics compare to 
those of the Amiga, there are also the results of a 
two-hour discussion the Amiga Answers panel had 
recently. What surprised me about the debate was 
the amount of criticism levelled at the Amiga - and 
this from supposedly dedicated fanatics. It just 
goes to show that if you care enough about some- 
thing it usually ends up bearing the brunt of a lot 
of flak. But imagine what colour the air would have 
been if we'd just concentrated on the Atari ST! 

And while we're on the subject, big things are 
happening in the ST world. There's a new 68030- 
based machine, the Falcon, with a very impressive 
spec at an even more impressive price of £399, all 
set for launch. Well, Atari had to do something 
pretty serious didn't it, having lost the 16-bit war 
abysmally? But if the next battle on the cards is a 
32-bit war, Commodore had better get a move on. 



MJSS^ 



Which is presumably 

why it has decided to 

drop the A2200 it only 

announced last month! 

Unbelievable! 

Still, the A4000 has 

finally made an 

appearance at The 

World Of Commodore 

Show in America - and 

it certainly looks 

promising (see page 7 for details). It suggests that 

a mid-range machine of some sort will soon be 

making an appearance. 

Meanwhile, the best thing to do is make the 
most of what you've got - and that's where we 
come in. 



\ - ' 



Enjoy the ish! 



fau StpKW 



Editor 



MORSE CODE MAESTRO 

There are thousands of Amiga programs which are 
available for little more than the price of a disk. And 
many more which allow you to try the software free 
before you buy. Each month in Public Domain World 
we examine the best of these programs and explain 
how to get hold of them. 

This month we focus on a Morse code tutor, a 
new operating system and a disk to help you draw 
up your Last Will and Testament! 

Public Domain World or 

Where there's a will... 

as we call it this month, starts on page 156 



"ma** 

17 PAGES DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY 
TO ANSWERING YOUR QUESTIONS 

Every month in Amiga Answers our panel of experts 
answer more genuine reader questions than any 
other Amiga magazine. Whether they are beginners' 
queries or esoteric puzzlers - we tackle them all In 
clear and concise terms. Amiga Answers takes the 
frustration out of Amiga computing. 

We answer questions every month on 
Workbench • The CLI • Comms • Programming • 
DTP • Video • Business software and more 

THE ANSWERS START ON PAGE 41 



FOR A FULL LIST OF CONTENTS, TURN THE PAGE 



This magazine comes from Future Publishing, a 
company founded just seven years ago, but which 
now sells more computer magazines than any 
other publisher in Britain. We offer: 

Better advice. Our titles are packed with tips, 
suggestions and explanatory features, written by 
the best in the business. 

Stronger reviews. We have a cast-iron policy of 
editorial independence, and our reviews give clear 
buying recommendations. 

Clearer design. You need solid information, and 
you need it fast. So our designers highlight key 
elements in the articles by using charts, 



Your guarantee of value 



diagrams, summary boxes, annotated 
photographs and so on. 

Greater relevance. At Future, editors operate 
under two golden rules: 

• Understand your readers' needs. 

• Satisfy them. 

More reader interaction. We draw strongly on 
readers' contributions, resulting in the liveliest 
letters pages and the best reader tips. Buying one 
of our magazines is like joining a nationwide user 
group. 

Better value for money. More pages, better 
quality: magazines you can trust. 



uiure 

PUBLISHING 



The home of Britain's finest computer magazines: 

Amiga Shopper ■ Amiga Format 

• Amiga Power • Commodore Format 

• PCW Plus • PC Plus 

ST Format • Your Sinclair • Sega Power 

Amstrad Action • PC Answers • PC Format 

Mountain Biking UK • Needlecraft • Classic CD 

• Cycling Plus • Photo Plus • Total! 
• Super Play • Mega - & loads more next year 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 




The Amiga 570 CD Drive has arrived. A major leap forward for you. But a slight problem for our photographer. Because jut 
one compact disc inserted into this ingenious machine can store the equivalent of up to 700 floppy discs - far too many to fit int 
a single photograph. That's an astonishing 550 Megabytes of memory, or 250,000 A4 pages of text. Enough to instantly transforr 
your Amiga 500 Plus into an interactive multi-media player with the capabilities of CDTV. 

In short, a real power-house. And one fully equipped to take advantage of over 100 CD titles already 
available covering everything from education to entertainment. The Amiga 570 CD Drive can also be used 
as a regular audio CD player. So its retail price of only £349-99, including our free Public Domain 



• ^ 



=i c=i Collection disc, should come as music to your cheque book. We could go on and 

From C* Commodore , . ... 

— i i — on about the Amiga 570. But how much more information could you possibly want? 



AMIGA 

THE ULTIMAT1 
HOME COMPUTEl 



STOP I'll INS. THE NEW AMIGA 570 CD DRIVE IS FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH THE AMIGA 500 PIUS. HOWEVER. IF YOU HAVE ANY OTHER TYPE OP AMIGA 500 PLEASE CONTACT YOUR DEALER BEFORE PURCHASING. ALTERNATIVELY WHY NOT EXCHAN4 
IT FOR A CDTV MULTIMEDIA PACK FOR ONLY 1399.99. THE A570 IS AVAILABLE FROM SELECTED HIGH STREET STORES. INCLUDING DIXON 5, SPECIALIST INDEPENDENTS AND MAJOR MAIL ORDER COMPANIES INCLUDING GREAT UNIVERSAL STOR1 



CONTENTS 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 



AMIGA SHOPPER 
Issue 19 November 1992 

Editor: Andy Storer 
Art Editor: Diana Taylor 
Deputy Editor: Cliff Ramshaw 
Production Editor: Alison Harper 
Consultant Editors: Jeff Walker, 
Mark Smiddy 
Contributors: Jason Holborn, Paul 
Overaa, Gary Whiteley, Phil Harris, 
Ian Wrigley, Philip Gladwin, Conrad 
Bessant, Toby Simpson, Wllf Rees, 
Jolyon Ralph 

Guest Composer: Antonio Vivaldi 
Ad Manager: Margaret Clarke 
Senior Ad Sales Executive: 
David Eckett 

Production: Richard Gingell 
Production Technicians: 
Simon Windsor, Chris Stocker 
Circulation Director: Sue Hartley 
Promotions Manager: 
Michele Harris 
Publisher: Stuart Anderton 
Group Publishing Director: 
Greg Ingham 
ABC audited circulation: 
January-June 1992: 
48,799 copies/month 
Printed by Redwood Press 
News Trade Distribution - 
UK: Future Publishing 0225 442244 
Worldwide: MMC Ltd 0483 211678 

This magazine is copyright © 1992 

Future Publishing Ltd. No part of this 

magazine may be reproduced without 

written permission. We welcome 

contributions for publication but regret 

that we cannot return any submissions. 

Any correspondence will be considered 

for publication unless specifically stated 

otherwise. 

Editorial 

30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA12BW 

Tel: 0225 442244 : Fax: 0225 446019 

E-mail: amshopper ©clx.compulink 

Advertising 

Rayner House, 23 Higher Hillgate, 

Stockport SKI 3ER 

Tel: 061-474 7333:Fax: 061-476 3002 

Subscriptions 

The Old Bam, Somerton TA11 7PY 

Tel: 0458 74011 

So how about winning another year's free 
subscription then chaps? - this time it's all 
about Guy Fawkes. seeing as how It's nearly 
bonfire night. Okay, answer this - where did 
poor old Guy's head end up after he'd been 
hung, drawn and quartered? You got It? 
Then lust send the terribly grisly details to: 
'Pity he didn't succeed', Amiga Shopper, 30, 
Monmouth St, Both. BA1 2BW. First out the 
bag wins 12 free Issues . Oh, and last Ish's 
winner was : ta da da. ...Nobody... as yet. cos 
that Dagmar question was a real bast! 



News 

A4000 launched - new chip set and version of AmigaDOS 
PLUS turn your A500 into an A3000 for $250! 

Talking Shop 1 3 

Your editor hosts the liveliest letters page in Amiga-land 



Exclusive! 7 C Programming 




The console threat, the PC threat, the possibility of a 
new range of Amigas - all things are considered by the 
experts as they assess probably the most exciting 
stage in the Amiga's history since its launch. 1 C 




Consoles 

Can the Amiga cope with the console threat? 

Amiga Answers 39 

17 pages packed with solutions to your Amiga problems 

Video 70 

The Director 2 and RocTec's RocKey reviewed 

DTP ~74 

Optical Character Recognition from Migraph 

Pascal 79 

HiSoft's implemen tation of Pascal for the Amiga is rated 

Controlling Chaos 82 

Explore the world of fractals on your Amiga 

Multitasking 

It's all happening at once with our new 
series on multitasking 




Learn the programming language of the 
professionals with the first part of our new tutorial 

ARexx 

Discover the delights of inter-program 
communication in our major new series on ARexx 

AmigaDOS 90 

The eclectic startup-sequence for ROM sharers re-visited 




Music 



98 



The Beat Studio reviewed PLUS OctaMED sequencing 

The World of Comms 106 

A visit to some of the best Amiga bulletin boards 

AMOS no 

Writing maze games PLUS AMOS command extensions 

Listings 134 

Converting 3D objects from Imagine to Videoscape3D 



Business 



139 



A look at the integrated package The Works Platinum 



Education 



145 



Art Tutor reviewed PLUS a round-up of 3D programs 

Reader Ads 148 

Get your hardware and software bargains here 

User Groups 1 50 

Turn here to make contact with hundreds of fellow owners 



DIY Programming 152 

The final part of the noughts and crosses program 



34 Get a Life 



154 



Continuing the creation of artificial life on an Amiga 




Public Domain World 



156 



All the latest releases in the PD and shareware scene 



Product Locator 1 68 

Your at-a-glance guide to the best in hardware 




84 Win a Philips monitor 



170 



We have two colour stereo monitors to give away, Just 
answer the three easy questions 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 



UleSeruE 



of Hampshire Established 7 years 



Amiga Workstation 
/Expansion System 

Monitor stand with shelf for drives etc. 
Strong metal construction made from 
1 4SWG steel epoxy coated Amiga 
colour. 

Special price L Z. / . O U 



New Citizen 



Swift 240 

24pin Colour* 

Advanced 24pin printer, lots of new 
features. Please phone for a data sheet 
•optional colour. Price with cable & paper 



240 Mono 
240C Colour 



£259 
£279 



Citizen 224 

24pin Colour* 

Enhanced 24pin printer, "optional colour 

with easy to use control panel 
2 year warranty. Price with cable & paper 



Mono 
Colour 



£199 
£209 



Swift 24E 

Enhanced 24pin. Colour printer 
with cable & paper 

Mono £229 
Colour £239 



New Price 



Midi Interface 

4 channel Midi Interface for Amiga 

£19 

Dr. Ts Midi Music Software 
lnotforA500+ orA600) £4.95 



HP 

Deskjet Colour 

300dpi colour inkjet printer. 
Colour laser quality at 1 /1 of the cost 
3 year warranty. Price with cable & paper 

£499 

Deskjet 500 

HP 300dpi Inkjet printer. Laser 

quality at dot matrix price. 

3 year warranty. With cable & paper 

£335 

Printer Drivers 

Citizen Colour 24pin 5.00 

Canon BJ-10e 4.95 

Deskjet 500 Colour 9.95 

Printer Dust Covers 

most types in stock 

from £4.70 inc VAT 



New Prices 



GVP Series 2 

forA500 Hard Disks 

52Mb Hard Disc £329 

1 20Mb Hard Disc £41 9 

240Mb Hard Disc £689 

52Mb A530 Combo £649 

120Mb A530 Combo £749 

240Mb A530 Combo £989 

for A 1500 

52Mb Hard Disk £265 

120Mb Hard Disk £405 

240Mb Hard Disk £629 

GVP ram £25 per 1 Mb 



Bridgeboards 

CBM A2286 286forA1500.... £269 
CBM A2088 XT for A1 500 £99 



Printer Packs 

All printers are supplied with a printer 
pack consisting of printer paper and a 
connection cable. If required a printer 
stand is £5.00 extra (with a printer) 

Free of charge 



Commodore 
1085SDI 

14" Colour Monitor with cable 
dot pitch 0.51mm Standard Res. 

£195 



Floppy Drives 



Cumana CAX354 

The most reliable drive you can buy 

1 M external 

£49 While stocks last 



Commodore 

A1011 1M external 
£49 While stocks last 



Roctec 

RocLite RF382C 1M external 

£56 



Ram Upgrades 

A500 1Mram + clock £21.90 
A500 1 Mram no clock £17.90 
A500+ 1Mram + clock £39.90 
A600 1 Mram + clock £49.90 



Amiga 1500 + 

WB 2.04 with full software 

£519 



Amiga 600HD 

20Mb internal Hard disk & software 

£419 



Citizen 120D + 



with cable 
& paper 



£109 



All Citizen printers have 
2 year warranty 



Citizen Swift 9 

with cable Mono £169 
&paper Colour £179 



Panasonic 
KXP1 1 23 

Probably the best 24pin mono 
printer available. With cable & paper 

£179 



Panasonic/Epson 

KXP1170 9pin 134 

KXP1 1 24i 24pin 227 

KXP2180 9pin Colour .... 189 
KXP2123 24pin Colour... 269 

Epson LX400 9pin 135 

Epson LQ570 24pin 265 

Prices include VAT cable & paper 



Naksha Scanner 

200 to 400dpi. 1 05mm CQQ 
width with express-IT T-!P<3 
software 



Naksha Mouse 

for Atari ST & Amiga poi EfJ 
with house & mat *-*■ ' iOU 



ifc. 



Squik Mouse 

for Atari ST & Amiga £13.90 



Canon BJ-10ex 

360dpi Inkjet printer 
with cable & paper 

£205 

Star SJ-48 

360dpi Inkjet printer 
with cable & paper 

£205 

Star LC200 

with cable & paper 

£179 

Star 

LC20 Mono 9pin 129 

LC200 Colour 9pin 179 

LC2420 Mono 24pin 189 

LC24200 Mono 24pin .... 209 
LC24200 Colour 24pin .. 259 
Prices include VAT cable & paper 

Kickstart Upgrades 

Commodore 2.04 full upgrade 79.00 
Kickstart ROM only v2.04 .... 41.50 

Kickstart ROM only v1.3 29.00 

Phoenix rom sharer 24.95 

Keyb'd operated rom sharer 24.95 
VXL30 25MHz Accelarator ..239.00 
Fatter Angus custom chip .... 37.50 

True Mouse 

for Atari ST & Amiga £15. 90 

Happy Mouse 

for Atari ST & Amiga £14.90 



Commodore 
1 084SD 

14" Colour Monitor with cable 
dot pitch 0.42mm. Medium Res. 

£195 While stocks last 



Amiga 600 

Standard A600 with full software 

£275 



£10.00 discount on 1084 
or 8833 with an Amiga 



Philips CM8833mk2 



Colour monitor 
with cable 

£199 



Colour monitor 
with no cable 

£189 



UK. 240V mains +game 



Accessories 



SONY 

DISKETTES 

SONY branded 

(lifetime warranty) 
(100% certified error free) 

10x 3.5" DS/DD135tpi 7.50 

50x 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 32.30 

100x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 59.93 

250x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 141.00 

Ikx 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 540.50 



Joystick/Mouse twin extension 4.70 
3M Joystick/Mouse lead .... 3.75 

A500 Printer cable 7.95 

Modulator/Disk Extension 10.95 

23way Plug or socket 2.95 

A500 Dust Cover 4.70 

Mouse Mat (thick soft type) .. 4.95 

Mouse House 2.95 

1M internal 3.5" drive 49.00 

A500 replacement PSU 39.00 

A590 replacement PSU 49.00 

Rocgen Plus - Genlock + .. 129.00 
Disc Wallet for 32 disks 7.95 



DISKETTES 

SONY /DYSAN bulk 

(lifetime warranty) 

(100% certified error free) 

10x 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 5.95 

50x 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 21.86 

100x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 39.60 

250x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 94.88 

Ikx 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 353.68 

40 x 3.5" Disk box with lock .... 5.49 
100 x 3.5" Disk box with lock .. 7.50 
Carriage on 50+ disks £3.53 



Phone for our 60 page catalogue 
EDUCATIONAL AND GOVERNMENT ORDERS WELCOME 
All products have a 30 day money back & 1 2 month warranty. 
Prices are subject to variation without prior notification. 
Established 7 years. 3 minutes from M27 Junction 1 1. 
Free parking. Open 9 to 5.30 Monday to Friday & 9 to 5 Saturday 
Postage 94p or £3.53 Securicor £6.46 (£5.50 + VAT) 



> 

o 

z 



lUeServe 



Larger items delivered 
by Securicor 



Amiga/Shopper Dept. 
40-42 West Street 
Portche8ter Hants 
P016 9UW 
Tel: 0705 325354 



-4 



IJJGSCrUB Best for service UJCSBrUB Best for service 



NEWS 



WORRY OVER 
WANG'S FUTURE 

Wang, the newly-appointed service 
and support organisation for 
Commodore UK, has filed for Chapter 
11 in the United States. 

Filing for Chapter 11 amounts to a 
declaration on the part of the 
company that it is in financial trouble. 
It has caused concern throughout the 
Amiga community. A spokesman for 
Wang has stated that the UK 
subsidiary handling Commodore's 
support commitments is unaffected by 
the action of its American parent. 
Commodore UK's managing director 
Kelly Sumner emphasised that Amiga 
owners have no cause for concern. 
"I'm completely confident with the 
situation, particularly the at-home 
support for the Amiga 600," he said. 

SCANNER UPDATE 

Pandaal Marketing has released 
version 3 of its hand scanner 
package. 

The new software supplied with 
the DaataScan Professional GS offers 
a grey scale editor, colour palette 
control, drawing tools, variable zoom, 
a multi-screen layout and the facility to 
add text to scans. It's now possible to 
resize, stretch, flip and crop images. 
Smaller images may also be merged 
together to create A4 documents. 

Scans may be touched up with the 
software's range of drawing tools, 
including freehand, line, polygon and 
curve, all in variable pen sizes. Editing 
is further enhanced by the inclusion of 
a cut and paste facility. 

An upgrade to the software is 
available for £20 via mail order. 
Alternatively, the new package can be 
bought complete with scanner 
hardware for the price of £149.95. or 
£89.95 mail order direct from City 
Beat on o 0234 327422. 

PHILIPS MONITOR 
PRICE DROP 

As part of its autumn promotion, 
Philips has reduced the price of Its 
popular stereo colour CM8833/II 
monitor by £30 to £199.99. 

The new price includes a one 
year's on-site maintenance warranty. 

As a further incentive to buyers, 
Gremlin Graphics' Lotus Turbo 
Challenge II game is being bundled 
with the monitor from now until 
Christmas. 

Buyers of the monitor are eligible 
to enter Philips' competition, whereby 
they stand to win a Ferrari Testarossa 
remote control car or even a VIP trip 
to the Silverstone Grand Prix. 

Turn to the back page to see how 
you can win yourself a Philips monitor 
in our competition. Philips w 081 689 
4444. 



The Advanced Graphics Architecture chip set arrives PLUS AmigaDOS release 3 

A4000 born in the USA 



Commodore has launched its 
latest Amiga at the World 
Of Commodore Show in 
Pasadena. 

Crowds were wowed by the 
stunning displays produced by the 
high-powered multi-media 
workstation, the first Amiga to make 
use of Commodore's latest graphics 
chips known as the Advanced 
Graphics Architecture chip set. The 
machine's central processor is 
Motorola's 32-bit 68040, clocked at 
25MHz. putting it firmly at the top of 
the Amiga heirarchy. Memory on the 
standard configuration is 2Mb of 
Chip (or graphics) RAM and 4Mb of 
Fast RAM. A 120Mb IDE hard disk is 
also included, as is a high density 
floppy drive which can be used to 
read PC disks. Disappointingly, the 
A4000's sound capabilities offer no 
improvement over those of a 
standard Amiga. 

RIGHT CONNECTIONS 

The A4000's external interfaces are 
much the same as on standard 
Amigas: keyboard, two mouse ports, 
a serial port, a parallel port, a video 
socket and stereo audio sockets. 
Internally the machine has three PC 
AT slots for accepting PC compatible 
cards, a 24-bit video slot and four 
Zorro III slots. Zorro III is the latest 
Commodore standard for plug-in 
cards, as used on the A3000. It is 
compatible with cards using the 
earlier Zorro II standard found in the 
A2000, but offers significant speed 
and memory advantages when used 
with Zorro III cards. 

The most exciting aspect of the 
new machine, the Advanced Graphics 
Architecture chip set provides the 
computer with a palette of 16.7 
million colours, up to 256,000 of 
which can be displayed on-screen at 
any one time. Resolutions are user- 
definable, ranging from 320x200 to 
1280x400 pixels. Higher resolutions 
are possible with the A4000's 
hardware video overscan. 

GRAPHIC PROOF 

A 256 colour VGA screen, as used by 
IBM PCs, can now be emulated with 
ease. Screen modes with a greater 
number of colours operate in a 
'super HAM' mode, but with much 
greater fidelity and clarity than the 
Amiga's standard HAM mode due to 
the increased colour resolution. 
Because of advanced CMOS 
technology and the chip set's full 32- 
bit architecture, it performs at 
something like four times the speed 




of the older 
ECS. Sprites are 
also improved, 
with a maximum 
width now of 64 
pixels. 

Because of 
the AGA's 32-bit 
architecture, it 
will not be made 
available for 
A500s or 
A2000s. 

The new hardware is catered for 
by a new version of the operating 
system: AmigaDOS Release 3. As 
well as providing full support for the 
new graphics modes, Release 3 
includes a PostScript printer driver 
and CrossDOS, a program enabling 
the machine to use PC disks. 
Support for foreign languages is also 
provided. The advantages of Release 
3, excepting those handling the AGA 
chip set, will be available for earlier 
Amigas as Workbench 2.1. 

Commodore UK's Kelly Sumner, 
when asked about the US launch, 
said: "I agree there is a product 
called the A4000. It's not due just 
yet- we'll keep you informed." 
Amiga Shopper believes it is due to 
be launched in the UK by mid- 
October. It sells for $3699 in the 
USA, and is expected to cost slightly 
over £2000 in the UK. 

No doubt the A4000 is the first 
in a line of Amigas to make use of 
the AGA chip set. It would be 
madness for Commodore to spend 
money on developing the technology 



The much-talked about A4000 Is 
finally a reality. Hopes are high that 
Its advanced graphics hardware will 
appear in cheaper machines 

exclusively for the A4000, which is 
likely to be a small market machine. 
Yet Kelly Sumner told Amiga Shopper 
that Commodore has decided not to 
market the A2200 announced in last 
month's issue. No reason for the 
decision was given, although the 
company is still believed to be 
intending to release a mid-range 
Amiga in the near future. 

MORE TO COME? 

This will be an Amiga with limited 
expansion potential, probably based 
on the Motorola 68020 processor 
and sporting the Advanced Graphics 
Architecture chip set. With the 
release of Atari's Falcon, the need is 
greater than ever for Commodore to 
release an enhanced Amiga at a 
reasonable price. Speaking of the 
Falcon, Sumner said, "I don't think it 
will succeed." If Commodore can 
release more machines like the 
A4000, he may be right. 



INDUSTRY REACTIONS... 



"The graphics are essential. PC 
owners have had 256 colours for a 
long time. This puts the Amiga back 
on top. It proves that Commodore is 
supporting the Amiga. We can 
assume that there will be other, 
cheaper machines to ensure the 
Amiga's future." - Toby Simpson, 
lead programmer for Millennium 

"The A4000's success depends on 
Commodore's promotional 
campaigns, and it has proved its 
considerable skill in this area with 
the A500 and A600. The success of 
any new hardware will also depend 
upon its support by third party 
developers. Having discussed the 
A4000 with GVP. I can reveal that it 
will be developing for it. In fact it has 
already designed one of its new 
products to be compatible with the 



A4000." - Andy Leaning, Silica 
Systems 

"The lack of a SCSI interface and 
decent quality sound are serious 
omissions which may well kill the 
machine. I think the head of the 
design team should be sacked. He 
is someone who knows nothing 
about the Amiga, who thought it was 
a PC. But the AGA chip set is 
fantastic, it really is the business." 
- Jolyon Ralph, CDTV developer for 
Almathera Systems 

"Although stopping short of full 24- 
bit colour, the new graphics spec 
should please video users - though I 
wonder whether the A4000 will be 
able to play animations in all those 
new colours" - Gary Whlteley, 
videographer and journalist 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



NEWS 



Amigas 
bundled for 
Christmas 



The latest A600 bundles for 
the run up to Christmas 
have been announced by 
Commodore. 

Bundling software with Amigas 
has been Commodore's preferred 
strategy for selling machines for 
some years now. The latest move 
involves two separate packs, one for 
the standard A600 and one for the 
A600 with hard disk. 



Aimed at the younger potential 
buyer, The Wild, The Weird & The 
Wicked pack will sell for £349.99. It 
includes Electronic Arts' DPaint III, 
Ocean's Push-Over, System 3's 
Putty and MicroProse's Grand Prix. 

The A600 with a 20Mb hard disk 
will be sold as part of the 
Epic/Language Lab bundle for 
£499.99. This includes DPaint III, 
Domark's Trivial Pursuit and Amiga 



Sub-$250 '030 
accelerator at 
American show 



The World Of Commodore Show In 
Pasadena was the scene of many 
exciting product launches. Here's 
our stop-press round-up of the 
highlights - a full report will appear 
In next month's Issue. 

• CSA showed its Derringer 
accelerator. The 25MHz 68030 
processor gives A500s and A2000s 
the same performance as an A3000 
for only $249.95. It has space on 
board for a maths co-processor and 
8Mb of RAM. 

• Commodore announced the 
imminent arrival of PCMCIA adaptors 
for the A2000 and A3000, giving the 
machines access to any credit card- 
based hardware or software that 
becomes available for the A600. 

• Commodore confirmed that there 
will in time be an Amiga laptop. 

• Commodore will have a SCSI II 
card available for the A4000 by 
Christmas. SCSI II is a much 
improved interface for connecting 
hard disks, tape streamers and the 
like to computers. 

• INOVAtronics demonstrated 
version 2 of CanDo, the multimedia 
authoring system. It features a 
better manual and script- 
bookmarking, whereby users can 
return to marked scripts with one or 
two keystrokes. 

• Black Belt Systems demonstrated 
the improved morphing features of 
its image processing package 
Imagemaster. On an A3000, 
Imagemaster will morph a broadcast- 
sized image some 20% faster than a 




Amazing morphing from Black Belt's 
Imagemaster package 

Silicon Graphics workstation. 

• A 24-bit graphics board and digital 
video editing system were 
demonstrated by Digital Micronics. 
Vivid 24 has a maximum resolution 
of 2048x2048 pixels with 16.7 
million colours and an 8-bit alpha 
channel. Its 16Mb of video memory, 
8Mb of program memory. Texas 
Instruments graphics processor and 
four maths co-processors enable it 
to calculate and render 100,000 
shaded polygons per second. The 
Digital EditMaster can record and 
compress video at 25 frames per 
second direct to hard disk using J- 
PEG compression technology. 
Frames can then be edited before 
being sent to an NTSC, PAL or SVHS 
recorder or monitor. 

• Opal Technology's OpalVision 24- 
bit graphics board was strutting its 
stuff. With a range of promised add- 
ons, the board looks set to give 
NewTek's Video Toaster a run for its 
money. And it's PAL compatible! 
Watch out for a full review In next 
month's Issue. 



Text word 

processor, Ocean's 
Epic, Millennium's 
Rome and System 
3's Myth. 

Stand-alone 
A600s will still be 
available in limited 
quantities. 
Commenting on the 
recent price 
change, Kelly 
Sumner said that 
the machine's rate 
of sale had more 
than quadrupled 
during the first 

month of the drop. An even greater 
increase is expected as Christmas 
approaches and a TV advertising 
campaign begins. Attractive point-of- 
sale units are being placed in 
Commodore stockists, including 
Comet. A welcome move is the 




Something for everyone in the A600 bundles 



employment of a team of 
demonstrators to travel across the 
country, showing people the virtues 
of CDTV and inviting them to try the 
machines for themselves. To help 
cope with the demand, Commodore 
now has a factory producing A600s 



Commodore's 
386 PC 
emulator 

Commodore's 386 PC Bridgeboard 
will be available by the time you 
read this. 

Priced at around £250, the board 
will fit in the Amiga 1500 and larger 
models. It comes with an Intel 386SX 
processor clocked at 25MHz and 
2Mb of RAM available for use by both 
the PC and the Amiga. A version is 
also planned for the A600 which will 
sell at a slightly lower price. 

Top of the range 
486 PC emulation 
from Vortex 

Vortex has announced a 486 PC 
emulator for the A1500/ A2000/ 
A3000 range of Amigas. 

The Intel 486 chip is used in 
state-of-the-art PCs, and is roughly 
equivalent to a 68040 accelerator. 
The Vortex emulator enables Amiga 
owners to keep up with the very best 
of PCs. 

The Golden Gate 486 SLC has a 
486SX processor clocked at 25MHz, 
complete with on-chip cache. It has a 
full 32-bit data bus and comes with 
2Mb of 60 nano second RAM. An on- 
board IDE hard disk interface is 
included, as is a co-processor slot. An 
optional floppy disk controller is 
available. The emulator will sell for 
around £850. Expect a review soon. 
Vortex « 01049 7131 597214. 



High quality 
audio for 
the Amiga 

SunRize Industries' AD516 digital 
audio card has been launched. 

The card provides eight tracks of 
16-bit audio - the first to do so for 
any computer. It comes with an 
SMPTE time code reader to enable 
the user to synchronise audio with 
video tape. Real time digital effects 
such as flanging, chorus and echo 
are provided by a digital signal 
processor. 

The card samples at up to 
48KHz, with 64 times over-sampling. 
Samples can be recorded to and 
played back from hard disk. Supplied 
with the hardware is version 2 of the 
Studio 16 package first sold with 
SunRize's 12-bit AD1012 card. The 
software provides VU and LED 
meters, multi-track mixing, eight track 
playback with simultaneous two track 
record, full editing facilities and Fast 
Fourier Transform effects. An ARexx 
port is also provided for external 
control. 

The AD516, including software, 
will cost in the region of £1000. It is 
distributed in the UK by HB Marketing 
w 0753 686000. Owners of the 
AD1012 can upgrade by contacting 
SunRize Industries direct on « 0101 
408 374 4962. 



SECOND CHOICE FIRST 

First Choice Computers is expanding. 
As part of its plans it has changed 
its name to First Computer Centre. 
The new number is 0532 319444. 



8 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 




Home Accounts2® 

An advanced version of 

Home Accounts, which is 

limited only by the capacity of your 

computer. Sophisticated reporting with 

graphics, and special options such as VAT 

and loan calculation facilities. Equally 

suitable for businesses, clubs and charities 

(ST and Amiga). £54.99 







Home Accounts 

Ideal for home users who want a simple 
low-cost way to plan and manage home 
finances. £29.99 



DGCalc 

This fast, simple spreadsheet includes 

many advanced features, including a 

windowing facility, so that you can look at 

different parts of the spreadsheet at the same 

time. £39.99 




DIGITA 



Moilshot Plus 

If you ever need to send out mailings or 
print labels, this program is for you. 
Animated labels appear on-screen as a 
continuous sheet, allowing you to scroll 
backwards and forwards. You can search, sort 
and detect duplicate labels, print side by side 
and much more. £49.99 



DGBase 

If you're looking for fast access to 

information, and the ability to create 

customised reports, then this relational 

database is for you (ST.. £49.99 



£9Jl*l 



DIGITA 




Day-By-Day 

An excellent way to get organised. You'll 
be reminded of birthdays, meetings and 
appointments. It includes month i 
planners and automatic reminders of overdue 
events £29.99 



Personal Tax Planner 

Plan your own tax with ease. This simple 

program will calculate your income tax 

liability, allowing you to perform instant 

'what-if ' calculations and produce pertinent 

facts about your tax position. A professional 

version is also available for accountants and 

financial advisers £49.99 









•MB 




E-Type 

Transform your computer into a type- 
writer. Because text is printed instantly, you 
can line up your form, press return and space 
a few times to move to the correct plan 
then start typing. Ideal for filling in forms 
and envelopes. £39.99 



ams which | ■ 
for a small business. T re 
independently or integrated and include 
Cashflow Co il and 

Invoicing and Statements. £59.99 

System 3e 

Like System 3, but with extended capacity 
for customer accounts and • 

£79.99 



System 3 





•SB* 



Cashbook Controller 

I oke the dl 

this program will replai 
petty cash books in additi 
cash, bank and VAT fxansai . can 

15 and purch i all 

these entries the program k 
complete doubli 

records are alwavs in balance £59.99 

•■ i 

Final Accounts 

ng the informal!' ■• ith 

Cashbook Controller, I n will 

produce a complete set of accounts, ind 

Trial Balance, Trading and Profit and L 

Account. Balance Sheet, as well as useful 

accounting ratios £39.99 

Cashbook Combo 

A money-saving combination pack containing Cashbook 

Controller and Final Accounl s £79.99 



Wordworth® 

The graphical nati 

producing docuni' 

With the enhanced printi ollins 

Spelling Checker and Thesaurus, no 

word pn lose (Amiga £1 29.99 




% 



The Digita range is available for Commodore Amiga, 
Atari ST and IBM PC unless stated otherwise, and every 
program comes with a seven day money-back guarantee. 

The only way to really appreciate Digita software is to 
use it. Phone 0395 270273 for more information, or write 
to Digita, FREEPOST, Exmouth EX8 2YZ. All prices 
include VAT, postage and packaging. 



See us at: 




DIGITA 

INTERNATIONAL 



© 



software (bats right 






The Digita range is available to the trade through Columbu 
HB Marketing, IB! and SDL.. 



Digita International Ltd Black Horse House Exmouth EX3 1JL ENGLAND lei 0395 270273 Fax 0395 268893 

■ 

e Accounts! and Wonhvorlh in 

All other trjdemaik,..' 



NEWS 



Future of computing to 

Earls Court is to play host to the most ambitious computing and 
electronic entertainment show this country has seen in years 




The UK's biggest computer 
show for years is all set for 
November 5. The Future 
Entertainment Show will 
cater for all home computer and 
console users, and incorporates The 
World Of Commodore Show. 

To accomodate the expected 
100,000 visitors, the huge number 
of exhibitors and some of the large 
and exuberant displays, the show 
will be taking place in both Earls 
Court 1 and 2 in London. 

THE FUTURE 

It will be the perfect opportunity to 
witness the future of home 
entertainment, pick up the latest in 
hardware and software, and meet 
the people behind your favourite 
mags, including Amiga Shopper. 
Naturally there'll be plenty of 
hardware and software launches to 
see as well as tried and trusted 
packages for sale at unbeatable 
prices. Without doubt you'll 



have the chance to meet the people 
responsible for the leading maga- 
zines for the Amiga. But what 
makes the show something out of 
the ordinary is the range of 'extra- 
curricular' activities - the games 
arcades, competitions, fairground 
rides, the huge video wall. There'll 
also be the finals to the National 
Computer Games Championships to 
be televised on ITV's forthcoming 
computer programme Bad Influence. 
£20,000 in prize money is up for 
grabs, courtesy of Future Publishing. 

Visitors to last year's Amiga 
Format sponsored World Of 
Commodore Show will be reassured 
to know that all of Its elements will 
be present at the Future 
Entertainment Show, including the 
manufacturer of the Amiga itself. 
They may also remember the 
fairground ride set up by 
Ocean. Be 



assured that there will be similarly 
ambitious crowd-pullers, including 
the original Aston Martin sports car 
as used by James Bond. 

ENTERTAINMENT 

There'll also be plenty of computer 
games to have a look at, if that's 
your bag. Both Nintendo and Sega 
have booked stands, so you can 
have a look at their consoles and 
how your opinions compare with 
those of Toby Simpson, the Amiga 
developer who assesses the console 
threat to the Amiga on page 34. 
The show runs from Thursday 
November 5 to Sunday November 8. 
It is open from 9.30am to 5.00pm 
on Thursday to Saturday; 9.30am to 
4.00pm on Sunday. 
Tickets are 



£7 for adults and £5 for children 
under 14. Of course, it makes sense 
to avoid the queues by booking your 
tickets in advance. You can do this, 
and save £1.05 per ticket into the 
bargain, by calling the credit card 
hotline on w 051 356 5085. 

Now, just to whet your appetite, 
here's a preview of some of the 
more Interesting things to be seen 
at the show... 



...STOP PRESS... STOP PRESS....,, 

American manufacturers GVP and 
Progressive Peripherals & 
Software have just confirmed 
their attendance. * ' : J i 'i V'A 




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CALL NOW & SAVE £1.05 

CREDIT CARD HOTLINE: 051 366 5085 



10 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



NEWS 



revealed at Earls Court 




FUTURE ENTERTAINMENT 

SHOW 
Thursday November 5 
- Sunday November 8 

OPEN FROM 
9.30am - 5.00pm 

Thurs - Sat 

9.30am - 4.00pm 

Sun 

TICKETS: 

£7 adults 

£5 under 14s 

BOOK IN ADVANCE 

Save £1.05 per ticket 

our credit card 

hotline on 

051 356 5085 



HALLB 

Computing and RetBll 



-J 
1 


4225\ 


4250 * 



HALL A 



Enleflalnmenl 




Scale 

I 10m I 

I "i i ii i ii I 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



11 




TEL: 

0446 

421316 



ROCLITE 3.5 SLIMLINE DRIVE 




Amiga Format says 
'beauttfuly made sflmlne 
drive, quick and quiet 
wtth afl the extras -85%' 
+ 3.5" 880KB External 

Drive 
+ Access time: 3ms 

track to track 
+ 0.9' high 

* Enable/disable switch 
+ 23 pin pass through 

socket 

* AJtows connection 
to a 3rd drive 

+ includes new chip 
which makes the 
Roclite tally com- 
patible with All 
A5CO+ Machine* 

£54.95 



AMIGA EXTERNAL HARD DRIVE 




SPECIAL PURCHASE LOWER 
PRICES 

* External hard drive for Amiga 

500 
+ Built In Autobooting 
+ On board Ram option up to 

8Mb 
+ Beginner friendly on-line help 
+ A super-last, high capacity 

hard drive that leaves others 

in Its wake 
Rochard 
RH800C 52Mb 
SCSI OK £299.95 

Rochard RH800C Hard 
Disk Controller £159.00 
RAM upgrode 
per 2 Mb £59.95 



MONITORS 



PHILIPS CM8833/1 1 STEREO 14" COLOUR MONITOR. 

Covered by a 12 month warranty includes connecting 

cable, green screen switch UK specifications 

£229.99 



GOLDSTAR AMIGA COMPATIBLE TV/MONITOR 



A 14" remote control colour Television/Monitor 
with Amiga Monitor Cable Only £179.99. 



PRINTERS 



__ Price Incl VAT 

SSf pln Sheeffeeder Printer 

'2?P„ 9 £97.50 £129.50 

Swift 9 9 £104,50 £187.00 

Swift 9X 9 £204.50 £264.50 

Swift 24E (including colour kit) £295,00 

Swift 24X 24 £204.50 £370.00 

Newlett-Packard 

Thlnkiet £320,00 

Quletjet £420,00 

Dosk|et 500 colour (3 year warranty) £559.00 

DeskJet (3 year warranty) £385 00 

PaintJet £600.00 

Commodore MPS127Q , 

£129.99 



Star LC20 
Star LC200 
Star LCI 5 
Star LC24-200 
Star LC24-200 

Canon BJ300 
Canon 
Canon BJ10E 

Brother 1309 9 £184.00 

Brother HR-20 Daisywheel £154.95 



9 £77.00 £133.00 

9 colour £77.00 £199.95 

9 £175.00 £240.00 

24 £77.00 £230.00 

24 colour £77.00 £269.95 



..£159.00 £415.00 

..£175.00 £470.00 

...£65.00 £230.00 



BEST BUYS SAVE £££'s 




AMIGA A600 SINGLE DRIVE 
4 GAMES WORTH £120. 0.5Mb RAM 
EXPANSION. COMMODORE MPS1270 
INK JET PRINTER. PRINTER STARTER PACK 



%8Xk £695^ 



OUR PRICE 
ONLY 



£495 



AS DEAL 1 BUT WITH NEW GOLDSTAR 
AMIGA/TV MONITOR, includes Scart 
Leads. Remote Control and 40 
Channel TV 




£895-" 



OUR PRICE 
ONLY 



£650 



AMIGA CDTV GAMES PACK 
includes - Amiga CDTV Player 
SOFTWARE - Hutchinsons Encyclopaedia 
Lemmings. Welcome disk. 




viffit ymm 



OUR PRICE 

ONLY 



£399.99 




7-8 SULLY VIEW 

Ty Verlon Industrial Estate 

Barry CF6 3BE 



FAX: 

0446 

420404 



FLOPPY DISKS 



3 



BRANDED DISKS 



0^ 



Boxes ol 10 

5.25' DSDD 48tpl 
5.25 - DSDD 96tpl 
5.25' DSHD 16Mb 
3.5 1 DSDD 135tpi 1Mb 
3.5" DSHD 2Mb 
3- Maxell CF2 



3M DATALIFE . TDK . VERBATIM 

DATAFILE PLUS . MITSUBISHI . 

ATHANA 

CHOOSE ANY OF THESE BRANDS 



^^ 



1-2 

£5.60 
£8.90 
£8.90 
£7.10 
£12.00 
£20.50 



3-9 

£5.30 
£8.40 
£8.40 
£6.80 



10* 
£5.20 
£8.10 
£8.10 
£6.50 



25* 

£4.70 
£7.80 
£7.80 
£6.15 



£11,60 £11.00 £10.35 
£19,50 £18.50 £16.70 



TOP AMIGA SOFTWARE 



, _ GAMES 

1 . Sensible Soccer £23 50 

2. Civilisation £32.50' 

3. Games Espania 92 £27.50" 

4. Secret Of Monkey Island £34.99' 

5. Lure Of The Temptress £27 50' 

6. Fire And Ice £22 50 

7. Hook (1MB) £22!50 

8. Premier £27.50 

9. Grand Prix £32.50 

10. Eye Of The Beholder 2 (1MB) £33.50 

NEW RELEASES ' Please ask about new products 
& educational plus business/home software. 



A570CD DRIVE 



With the NEW A570 CD DRIVE, attached to your 
A500 AMIGA, It will have essentially the same 
capabilities as Commodores CDTV Player. Like 
the CDTV your new system will allow you to play 
any CDTV title as well as CD+G. CD+MIDI and 
standard audio CD's. The A570 Installs easily, no 
software installation is required, you can contin- 
ue to use your Amiga Keyboard, mouse and 
monitor for inputs and displays. 
£375.00, including VAT & Carriage. 



DISK BOXES 




1-9 


10+ 


1 Capacity 3.5" 


£0.85 


£0.75 


10 Capacity 5.25" 


£0.95 


£0.85 


25 Capacity 3.5" 


£3.25 


£2.75 


40 Capacity 3.5" 


£4.40 


£3.95 


80 Capacity 3.5" 


£4.95 


£4.55 


100 Capacity 3.5' 


£5.65 


£5.25 


50 Capacity 5.25" 


£4.95 


£4.55 


100 Capacity 5.25' 


£5.65 


£5.25 


80 Capacity (stackable) 


£1 1 .50 


£9.40 


200 Capacity (stackable) 


£19.50 


£17.95 






NO HIDDEN EXTRAS 



FAX PHONE 

0446 0446 
420404 421316 



BULK DISKETTES 



0^ 



We only source bulk diskettes 

from major manufacturers, 

therefore we only supply quality 

performance products. 



^^ 



Price per disk 
525 - DSDD 48tpi 
5.25- DSDD 96tpl 
5.25 - DSHD 1.6Mb 
3.5" DSDD 1Mb 
3.5- DSHD 2Mb 



100% ERROR FREE (Prices include VAT) 



20 
0.28 
0.30 
0.40 
0.45 
68 



50 100 

0.27 0.24 

0.29 0.27 

0.39 0.36 

0.43 0.41 

0.65 0.63 



200 

0.23 
0.26 
0.35 
0.39 
0.61 



500 1000 

0.22 0.20 

0.25 0.25 

0.34 0.33 

0.38 0.34 

0.59 0.58 



ACCESSORIES 


Keyboard Drawer 




14' Tilt and Swivel monitor stand 


£9.99 


Multifunction printer stand 


£15.99 




£3.99 




















3.5* cleaning kit 


£1 50 




£2.45 

£1.95 



MICE & SCANNERS 


ROCTEC AMIGA MOUSE rm3000 

Superbly styled, ergonomic design 
smooth precise operation! 
200dpl/500mm/sec 


£13.95 


OPTICAL MEGA MOUSE 




NAKSHA SCANNER for Amiga 500 


...£115.00 


DAATASCAN PROFESSIONAL 
A625 SCANNER 


...£170.00 

£26.50 

.P.57 95 


FANCY MOUSE (AMIGA) 

CORDLESS MOUSE 





JOYSTICKS 


Fllghtgrip 


£14.95 

£8.95 


Python 1 


£9,95 




Speedking Autoflre 


£10.50 










Tac50 ; 




Black Cruiser 


£9.95 










Foot Pedal 


£22 50 






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LETTERS 



DIAMOND PCs 

Have you seen the recent Diamond 
Computers ad? It's bad enough with 
that CD-I joke, but what about the 
previous page? Why not get yourself 
a real computer? Why not indeed 
buy an Amstrad 386SX? 

Somehow I don't think so. 
Although I own a B2000HD, I also 
use top-end PCs and UNIX systems 
all day at work, so I can safely state 
without bias that PCs are crap! 

Just for the record, here are a 
few things that my computer 
experience has led me to notice... 

My trusty Amiga has software 
that PC owners can only dream of, 
and even with its paltry 7MHz 
processor, can easily give a 486 
running Windows 3.1 a run for Its 
money. 

The old chestnut - software. 
Games - nothing else comes close 
(perhaps a MegaDrive). Business 
software - fair enough, most 
businesses use PCs, and their 
associated software but most 
decent Amiga packages can import 
PC standard formats, and in general 
they are many times superior to the 
PC packages. With an emulator, you 
can even run the PC software itself. 
I'd like to see an Amiga emulator on 
a PC! 

Last year I was producing some 
reports on a Mac, and in order to 
work at home, borrowed a friend's 
AMAX. Surprise, Surprise, it was 
actually faster than the genuine 
Mac! 

The only computer better than 
an Amiga I have used Is a Sparc- 
based X-termlnal, but with all the 
upgrades available (eg Super- 
Denise, 68040s, etc) and the 
rumours of the new Amigas, even 
these are coming under threat. 

Well, that's enough slagging off 
for now but with all these stupid 
"my computer's better than yours" 
arguments going around, I had to 
get it off my chest. If anyone can 
come up with a decent pro-PC 
argument, apart from price (you get 
what you pay for!) then I'd like to 
hear it, but for the time being, keep 
up the good work Amiga Shopper, 
you're an excellent magazine. 

James CC Darling 
Bracknell 

Points taken James - though I doubt 
whether your Amiga can really give a 
486 a run for its money! 

I take it then you won't be one of 
the readers just dying to check out 
pages 23 to 32 of this issue... 

ON THE OTHER HAND 

Referring to your recent 
correspondence on the 600/500 
Plus, I find Commodore's marketing 
strategy rather strange. Having 
owned a 1.3 for the last three 
years, an opportunity occurred to 
pass it on and replace it with a 
newer model. Looking around the 



local agents the 600 and the Plus 
were on display but no technical 
information on either was available. 
The salesman could only give a 
superficial explanation of the 
differences and changes made, 
based on hearsay and rumour. When 
I bought the 1.3 I was given all the 
pamphlets containing full details of 
the specification and possibilities. 
Commodore obviously doesn't 
bother any more. 

The most startling improvement 
made to the 500 in its seven year 
life appeared last October 
unheralded, unannounced. Now six 
months later it is dead. 

As an owner, I received letters 
from time to time to take out a 
maintenance contract with the 
Commodore Repair Centre. How 
much would that have been worth 
now? 

A friendly dealer In my local 
town recently told me he has now 
stopped selling the Amiga - his 
customers were becoming 
hopelessly and utterly confused 
with Commodore's chopping and 
changing and about the lack of any 
consistent policy and stability. He 
also knew of others who had taken 
similar action. 

Using existing experience and 
the details and comments in the 
Amiga press, it did not take long to 
decide on the Plus as It could be 
bought with 2Mb of RAM much 
more cheaply than a 1Mb 600. 

I did not intend to use a hard 
drive, and a TV modulator is 
unnecessary when you have a 
monitor. Also a numeric keypad Is 
very useful when entering large 
amounts of numerical data. 

Unless you are going to play 



"The only computer 

better than an 

Amiga I have used 

is a Sparc-based 

X-terminal" 



games, a TV is useless anyway. If 
you have to use a TV the only way 
to get a half decent picture is to 
use something like a Goldstar 
TV/monitor with a Scart connection 
which does not use the inferior 
modulator. 

Having tried a modulator out, 
admittedly with an old but still 
serviceable telly, the picture was 
worse than I can remember on my 
rubber-keyed Spectrum. 

As for using the 600HD for 
serious applications, just look at 
the Capt. Diamond advert in issue 
17 where it is offering an Amstrad 
386SX PC for £800. This comes 
with an 80Mb HD, 4Mb of RAM, a 



Talking 

SHOP 



Welcome to the Amiga world's liveliest letters 
pages! - the place where you get the chance to 
speak your mind. So join your host, the editor, 
Andy Storer for some more no-holds barred 
bantering. And remember, all you have to do to 
be included is send your missive to: 
'Talking Shop', Amiga Shopper, 30, Monmouth St, 
Bath BA1 2BW. So get to it!... 



1.44 Mb disk drive, a 10" high- 
resolution colour monitor, mouse, 
two speakers and a joystick along 
with MS-DOS 3, Windows and 
software, all running at 20MHz. 

Just suppose you were to 
choose a 600HD. To make it 
comparable, Evesham Micros can 
supply a 600HD with an 80Mb HD 
for £580 and its prices are usually 
competitive. However this will have 
1Mb of RAM and, as everyone 
knows, a 600HD with a hard drive 
fitted only has about 0.7Mb of RAM 
available. Any serious software 
needs at least 1Mb to run, so you 
will need a 1Mb RAM expansion as 
a minimum. Possibly a lot more. 

So add on another £40 taking 
the price up to £620 and you 
haven't got a screen yet. The 
remaining £180 difference has to 
provide a colour monitor even if it is 
only a 10". After all that you would 
have a system with half the RAM, 
an 880K disk drive, no joystick and 
no software running at 7MHz. 

There really is no comparison 
and I think Commodore needs to 
get its act together if it is going to 
stave off the threat of ever 
decreasing prices for PCs which you 
can now obtain In bits and pieces to 
build up your own customised 
system. 

You might ask why did I buy a 
500 Plus instead of a PC - well I 
use it as a hobby and like playing 
about. I am an AMOS fan, and 
already had a 1084S to use and it 
would have cost a lot to scrap 
everything and start again with 
another system. But I must admit 



Commodore does strain its 
customer loyalty to the limit. 

GH Jones 
Leicestershire 

All I would say is that all computers 
are mere boxes and it's what you run 
on them and why which makes the 
difference - not the particular spec 
of the hardware. 

BUT THEN AGAIN 

The replies you gave to the worried 
A500 owners in issue 16 greatly 
reassured me, a fellow A500 owner. 
However, in the light of your saying 

- "It's not as though 1.2 million 
Amigas... are going to disappear off 
the face of the planet... (and) sheer 
force of numbers is going to 
maintain a healthy market provision 
because developers can't afford to 
ignore such a massive user base..." 

- I thought you would like to know 
of the treatment given Kickstart 1.3 
owners (and there are hundreds of 
thousands of us) by some well- 
known companies. 

I purchased a new Vidi 12 by 
mail order and eagerly awaited its 
arrival. The morning it arrived I 
ripped open the envelope to see 
what I had bought. Among the 
packaging I came across an 
envelope. Strange, I thought, what's 
that for? To my shock I soon 
discovered that I had to send for the 
program disk, as the disk supplied 
is for Workbench 2 users only. To 
add insult to injury, the order form 
says the 1.3 disk Is "Free!" I should 
hope so! 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



LETTERS 



The most annoying aspect of it 
all is that it would cost the 
suppliers peanuts to include the 
disk in the first place. The 
packaging even states - 
"Compatible with all Amigas... 
includes... software". 

I certainly feel that as a 
Kickstart 1.3 owner I "have 
disappeared off the face of the 
planet"! 

Gavin Dodds 
Tyne and Wear 

It would be a little wasteful for a 
company to include both disks 
though wouldn't it? - and I guess the 
reference to compatibility with all 
Amigas means those running 
Workbench 2! Yeah, you're right of 
course, but surely it's not that bad a 
problem to sort out? 

AMIGA VERSUS ATARI 

I have been reading the rumours of 
new Amigas with interest, also 
about the rants and raves of 
A500/A500 Plus owners 
concerning the A600. The 
expansion port has been removed 
but I'm sure the hardware makers 
will find ways of connecting 
accelerators and everything else to 
the credit card slot. 

Last time I wrote (issue 9) I had 
an A1000 but soon upgraded to an 
A500 Plus. The ASOO's appearance 
has annoyed me In that my machine 
will plummet in value if the A600's 
price comes down, making it 
difficult if not impossible to get 
enough for a new Amiga. 

So I am seriously considering 
one of these Atari Falcons. Their 
specs are very interesting - the 
graphics won't be as good as the 
new Amigas but the sound may well 
be a lot better and if there is a 16- 
bit sampler chip (ADC) built in, this 
may be the deciding factor for me - 
and I'm a diehard Amlgan of five 
years now! 

Here's the comparison:- 
Colours 

New Amiga 256/4096/256,000 
Falcon 256/32,000 

Palette: 
New Amiga 
Falcon 
Resolution 
New Amiga 
Falcon 

Sound output 

Amiga 4 channels 16-bit 57KHz 
Falcon 8 channels 16-bit 50KHz 
Sound Input 

Amiga 1 channel 8-bit 22KHz 
Falcon 2+ channels 16-bit 50KHz 
CPU 

Amiga 68030 16MHz 

Falcon 6830 16MHz 

DSP 

Amiga 56001 

Falcon 56001 

Besides these, the Falcon includes 
sound de/compression, direct to 
disk recording, and connection to 



24-bit (16 million) 
16-bit (256,000) 

1280 by 960 
640 by 480 



CD-ROM drives - all for £399. 
Other specs Include IDE/SCSI 2, 
possibly on both machines, and 
many other similar features. 

Don't believe me? Take a run 
over to the ST Fonnat offices and 
have a look. The features of the 
Atari have all been seen, unlike the 
new Amigas which are the result of 
rumours and developers breaking 
non-disclosure agreements. 

But if they are true, Commodore 
will have a serious fight on its hands 
and unless the price is low enough 
Atari will wipe up the entire market. 
I imagine Commodore would be safe 
graphics-wise but Atari will eat the 
entire sound market and 
Commodore will not get a look In 
unless the sound input/output 
question is solved - I know where 
my money will be going, being 
interested in sound. 

But there is hope yet - 
Commodore will probably cut Its 
prices and the sound input/output 
could be improved to match the 
Atari by using a 56002 DSP chip at 
40MHz - the sound channels could 
be doubled if not quadruped (or 
morel). Unless the sound chip itself 
is modified to give 8 or 16 channels, 
and a 16-bit DAC (sampler) chip is 
added at fairly low cost - I know as 
I nearly became a Commodore 
registered developer last year 
making 16-bit samplers. A de- 
interlacer is supposed to be fitted to 
the new Amigas with 1Mb video 
RAM, increasing this to 2Mb would 
allow all modes (including overscan) 
to be de-interlaced at fairly low 
cost. 

No doubt Commodore is 
considering its moves at this time 
already, but with the competition 
showing Its new machines, 
Commodore will be able to react. 
Will ft at least add a 16-bit ADC 
for recording sound? How will the 
CDTV be changed with Atari also 
considering such a machine? Will it 
supply a monitor capable of 
showing the new super duper ultra 
hires modes? The price of such 
monitors as I have seen is about 
£800. 

A previous Commodore tactic 
has been to keep the price of the 
Amiga higher than the Atari to give 
the impression of a superior 
machine being worth more. Would 
this be a wise move In the current 
economic climate? Consumers may 
simply go for a cheaper machine 
because of the lower price. 

Nicholas Blackford 

Bangor 

Wales 

Of course, all your 'New Amiga' 
specs really put the 'spec' into 
speculation, but I have to admit, the 
Falcon really is an incredible deal - 
it even has a built-in genlock! Still, 
can't see it selling in big numbers 
though - who's developing for it? 
Answers on a postcard please... 



I CAN LARF ABOUT IT NOW SPECIAL 

Have you learned a valuable lesson from the trials and tortures of experience 
or overcome some mind-boggling problem through incredible Ingenuity or even 
sheer luck? Then let us know and win yourself a fiver Into the bargain. Just 
send your post-embarrassed tomes to 7 can larf about It now', Amiga 
Shopper, 30, Monmouth St, Bath BA1 2BW. 

1. Printing was just a drag... 

I have recently purchased a Citizen printer to use with my Amiga 500 Plus 
and have often used it for printing colour graphic Images. 

As you know this can be slow and like most other people, I sit playing 
with my mouse while I am waiting. It was while doing this that I discovered a 
way to increase the speed at which my print-outs are produced. 

I noticed that, between sweeps of the print-head, there is a delay, 
presumably while the Amiga converts the screen image to codes for the 
printer. I have found that if I 'drag' the current screen, usually Deluxe Paint 
IV, so that it is out of view, (ie, the menu bar is at the bottom of the screen), 
the gap between sweeps of the print-head is greatly reduced. In fact I would 
estimate that the printing speed is increased by about 2-3 times. 

I suspect that this phenomenon is due to the Amiga not needing to 
process the screen, but I expect you will be able to clarify this. Anyway I 
thought you would like to pass this tip on to other Amiga users. I suspect this 
speeds up all processing, not just print programs, although I have yet to 
attempt to prove this. 

John Hedger 
Luton 

2. Trouble pin-pointing the problem...? 

The following story may seem to some people a bit strange, but at the time 
the solution to my problem seemed quite reasonable. 

I am the proud owner of an Amiga 1500 and approximately 6 months ago 
I decided to become one of the elite accelerator card owners, so off I trotted 
and bought myself a Microbotics VXL-30 68030 board. To those who don't 
know, this board is of the 'piggyback' variety which means that you have to 
take out your existing 68000 CPU, mount the VXL in the 68000 slot and then 
remount the 68000 in a slot on the VXL. 

Now, installing all this on my 1500 meant that I had to take off the power 
supply and disk drive mounting which covers the 68000. This meant I had to 
unplug the main ribbon connector which connects the drives to the 
motherboard. Everything seemed OK, the mounting came off, the accelerator 
went in, and the mounting went on again. But, horror, when I tried to use the 
disk drives afterwards, they just would not work, proclaiming every disk to be 
corrupt. 

So, off I went, back-tracking the installation procedure, checking all the 
connectors and pins etc and guess what I found? One of the pins on the 
motherboard which fits into the disk drive ribbon connector had snapped off 
and the pin was stuck in the plastic connector which fits over ft. After nearly 
having a nervous breakdown, thinking of the time it would take to send my 
1500 back to be repaired, I decided to do a little bit of home electronics. 

What I did was to snip the point off a drawing pin, trim it to size with 
some pliers and shove this Into the plastic connector, down the hole where 
the snapped off pin was, so that a little bit of drawing pin poked out of the 
connector. I then pushed the connector onto the motherboard so the new pi 
made connect with the motherboard and effectively took the place of the 
snapped pin. After re-assembling my 1500 and trying to use the disk drives, 
success! So, at the moment, my two disk drives on my 1500 are being used 
through the help of a drawing pin. It has been six months since this little bit 
of DIY and I have done a few more internal alterations to my 1500 (hard 
drive, RAM etc) and the disk drives are still working perfectly. 

I am glad to say that I can laugh about it now. 

Martin Linklater 
Cleveland 



You will be amused with what happened to me when I first set up and used 
my Amiga 500 Plus (inc GVP 52Mb HD). I kept trying to load KCS and Super 
Jam but couldn't do it! 

Discussions with Zone had no effect, but it wasn't until I used the "Show 
File By Name" rather than the usual ICON that I spotted the cause - the 
symbol for both KCS and Super Jam were In fact loading exactly behind the 
DFO symbol - showing by name gave them peeping out coyly! Has anyone 
else had this trouble? 

John Fisher 
Essex 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



TALKING SHOP SPECIAL 





- Where it's been 

where it's at 

and where it's going 



Gather together Amiga Shopper's experts panel in a conference 
room, offer 'em free drinks and set the ball rolling with news of a 
new Amiga - and what do you get? Arguments. Loads of 'em. Like, is 
the PC really a better deal?, are the consoles trouncing us?, is CDTV 
just a load of hype?, will the A2200 be worth waiting for?, what use 
are credit card slots? and do you want to step outside right now?... 




Let's assume that after Xmas 93 
the Amiga games market has 
plummeted.... where does that 
leave the Amiga? 




It leaves the A600 dead... 
Commodore would have to go 
A3000 upwards... 



Jeff Walker, DTP expert 
and consultant editor 



Andy Storer, editor, 
Amiga Shopper 





What it'd also have to do is improve 
Workbench considerably, improve the 
whole of Intuition - it's nowhere near as 
good as the Mac interface... 




Mark Smlddy, developer 
and consultant editor 

I run my productivity software on a 500 
Plus - it's a better system than a 486 
PC with Windows - Workbench is easier 
to use 

Jolyon Ralph, CDTV developer 



But the Amiga's just starting 
now... in just two years we've 
had a new Workbench, 24-bit 
graphics, 16-bit sound cards and 
ARexx - it's the most exciting 
year since 1985 





So look at emulators then, 
that's another thing that'll 
keep selling Amigas 



Gary Whlteley, 
video correspondent 

But how many of you here 
thought 'Wow, what a great 
move!' when the A600 was 
launched? I bet most of you 
didn't... 



Jason Holborn, AMOS 
and ARexx expert 



Wilf Rees, 
education columnist 



Just some of the choice extracts from the no-holds barred debate 
about to start over the page - pour yourself a beer and enjoy!... 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



15 



TALKING SHOP SPECIAL 



THE FUTURE 
STARTS HERE 




The Amiga Answers panel all set to embark on a two hour discussion on the 
potentials and pitfalls facing the Amiga range. Will this year be the best ever? 



AS: So let's kick off by asking what 
everyone thinks about Commodore's 
decision to announce a new Amiga 
based on the Motorola 68020 chip? 

MS: Well, it's a logical step. 

JR: There's still a price advantage on 

the '020. 

JW: They did say that this new 

machine would be sub £1000. 

MS: Is that going to be with a 

monitor, or is it going to be like a 

2000? 

JW: That's without a monitor. 

Basically, it's going to be a 2500, 

but cheaper and with higher specs. 

WR: Was there any mention of a 

MIDI interface? 

AS: No: Commodore hasn't said any 

more. 

WR: What about the rumours of 

Roland sound chips, and of graphics 

chips? 

AS: There were no details other than 

that it would be '020-based. 

JR: If it's '020-based with a new 

board, rather than a standard 68000 

chip with an '020 card fitted in, like 

the 2500 was, then it's going to 

have an '020 with full 32-bit access 

to Chip RAM, and a full 32-bit 

memory access. 

AS: What sort of performance 

advantages is an '020 going to give 

you over a standard 68000? 

JR: It depends on the speed the 

chip's running at. Does anyone know? 



MS: No, but I would guess 16MHz, 
JR: The Commodore plug-in '020 
card gives around 4 or 5 times 
speed increases over a standard 
Amiga. But a machine with 32-bit 
Chip RAM should be a bit faster; I 
would guess about five times faster. 
JW: Having an '020 chip would make 
an enormous difference - the main 
complaint about DTP for instance is 
the speed of screen-refresh. 
WR: Doesn't it really depend on 
horses for courses? If this new beast 
is going to have expandability, lots of 
slots and so forth, what really is the 
best option? Are you better off 
buying the new machine, or are you 
better off buying a 2000 and putting 
a GVP 25MHz '030 card for, what, 
£599? You've got far more speed; 
you've got far more flexibility, and 
you've still got all the slots. 
JR: Despite being a developer I know 
nothing about this machine, but from 
what I gather I would guess that it's 
going to have Zorro III slots rather 
than Zorro II, because it's a new 
machine. Now that provides a lot 
more flexibility. 

It would also make sense if 
Commodore put it in a 3000-sized 
case and gave it the 3000 processor 
expansion slot, which means you'd 
be able to use standard 3000 '040 
cards and go straight from an '020 
to an '040. With Zorro III slots you 



WHAT ARE ZORRO II & III? 

Zorro II is the standard for A1500/A2000 plug-in cards. Zorro III, as on the 
A3000, is a 32-bit standard, giving faster data transfer rates. A Zorro II card 
may be used in a Zorro III slot. 



can expand to up to 64Mb of RAM on 

one card; you've got room for far 

more intelligent devices. Though at 

the moment there's only two or three 

cards that use it... 

AS: Do you think Commodore would 

offer a trade-up on the A500 to the 

'020-based machine? 

JW: No. 

JR: It depends; only if it doesn't sell. 

If it's a roar-away success it won't 

bother. There's no point in doing 

trade-ins on things that are doing 

really well. 

AS: So that explains the trade-up 

scheme whereby you take in your old 

A500 and get a CDTV. 

GW: Out of interest, what does it do 

with the old A500s? 

WR: It puts them in the CDTVsl 

JR: Then sends them to Rumania! 

AS: That's not what happens... is it? 

JR: Commodore obviously was not 

going to tell me what it'd be 




JR: It would make sense, if it's going 
to try and persuade software 
companies to put stuff out on credit 
card. One of the main reasons it has 
chosen PCMCIA is because one of 
the main faults of the A500 was the 
edge connector slot, which was 
unreliable. There were bad 
connections, you couldn't do decent 
pass-thrus, and more importantly 
than that, it couldn't guarantee that 
with future machines you'd be able 
to take peripherals off of it and put 
others on without powering down. 
Now this is one of the things 
about the PCMCIA... if you buy a 
peripheral, there's no reason why 
you can't buy a future machine, even 
something different like a PC, and 
plug your peripherals into that with a 
new software driver where 
necessary, and still use them. 
AS: Commodore is also claiming that 
the memory cards for the new 
Amstrad NC-100 machine will fit the 
A600. As I understand it, one of the 
future uses of that credit card slot 
would be removable hard disks, small 
enough to fit in your top pocket. 
JW: Oh, you can buy them now. 
AS: So can we talk about those kind 
of add-ons? What do you think we'll 
see coming out for that slot? 
JR: Everything you would get normally 
plugging into an Amiga's standard 
expansion, You'll see companies like 
GVP providing, in the near 

future, things 



"Having an '020 chip would make an 

enormous difference - the main complaint 

about DTP for instance is the speed of 

screen-refresh" 



doing with the traded-in 
machines... 

JH: When I first saw a picture of a 
CDTV with a keyboard attached to it, 
it was an A1000 keyboard. And at 
that time in the States, it was 
doing a trade-in deal where A1000 
owners just had to take in their 
keyboards. 

JR: That was the original idea. But it 
was just too expensive to get all 
those keyboards, clean them all, re- 
spray them and put new connectors 
on them. It actually works out too 
expensive to do that. 

WHAT'S ON THE CARDS? 

AS: Do you think Commodore would 
go for a PCMCIA slot like that in the 
A600 in the new machine? 



like RAM expansions for it, 
samplers... all sorts of things. 
JW: Looking through the PCMCIA 
resource reference book, there are 
no known Amiga developers In the 
list of widgits at the moment, so 
they've got to start from scratch. 
JR: One of the things you can do 
which you can't do with an ordinary 
expansion slot is plug and unplug 
things while the machine is switched 
on. There's no reason if you have a 
removeable hard disk and a sampler, 
why you can't plug in your sampler 
and sample something, then remove 
it, plug in your hard disk and save 
the sample. 

WR: I wonder if the A670 CD-ROM 
drive is going to plug into that slot. 
MS: Yeah, it is. 
JR: There's nowhere else you can 



AND WHAT'S PCMCIA? 

It's the interface standard used on the A600's credit card slot. It means that 
RAM cards. ROM cards, modems and so forth for IBM PCs can also be used 
with the A600. It is expected to be implemented on all future Amigas. 



16 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



TALKING SHOP SPECIAL 



plug it. Which means that Commodore 
is going to have the A670 as a boxed 
unit with a cable coming out and this 
credit card on the end, which means 
presumably that if it does produce 
top end machines with this slot, then 
it's instantly got a CD-ROM drive for 
them. 

WR: I wonder if the developers will 
side-step the A600? The one thing 
that I was waiting to see was some 
sort of plinth that the A600 sits on 
which converts it to an A500 with the 
edge connector/trapdoor 
configuration. 

JR: There's no reason why a 
developer couldn't produce a 
PCMCIA card that fits into the A500 
slot, so that if you've got your GVP 
hard disk or whatever, you just plug it 
in and then you're there. It would 
almost certainly need its own power 
as well, though. 

DREAM MACHINES 

AS: Talking about new machines and 
so on, maybe we could just go 
around the table and ask each of you 
what, from your chosen specialism, 
your wish list would be on this new 
Amiga? 

WR: I would have thought first of all 
a MIDI interface. The Atari machines 
did so well because of this. 
JR: Yeah, I agree. It would be a trivial 
thing to add - that's why Commodore 
put one in the CDTV. 
AS: What about graphics? 
WR: I think it's pretty well served 
with graphics. 

JH: Well, if we were going totally 
crazy, I'd like to see a macihne 
that's '030 based at least with a 32- 
bit architecture and with a custom 
chip set that was 32-bit as well; 24- 
bit graphics as standard on a 
standard screen; 16-bit sound with 8 
channels; MIDI as standard. 
JR: You can build up this system 
already. 

JH: That's right, the talk about the 
A4000 is you have 24-bit as 
standard, so the machine I just 
described is not entirely crazy. 
JR: The point is we've got to look at 
the fact that the market for base 
machines with 24-bit graphics and 
16-bit sound isn't there. It's not 
going to be there until there's a vast 
amount of software that makes use 
of it. 

MS: It's like the chicken and the egg. 
JH: I don't know if it is a chicken and 
egg situation though... if Commodore 
creates the market, if it puts out a 
machine with this kind of hardware... 
JR: All I'm saying is that it can't 
afford to put too much in - that will 
raise the price too high. 
JH: Then why is it talking about 
bringing out the A4000? 
MS: Who's talking about it? It's just 
a rumour. 
JR: But you can buy all these things 



as add-ons anyway. 
JH: Yeah, but a lot of users don't 
want to have the hassle of choosing 
this card or that card to fit in their 
machine - they want them to come 
as standard. 

JR: You can always get someone to 
make one up for you like that. 
MS: The problem is that no-one is 
going to want to develop software for 
a configuration that only a small 
number of people possess. If it was 
a case of 8-bit or 24-bit colour as 
standard in the machine, then 
developers would have to make use 
of it. 

WR: It's all about configurations 
though, isn't it? 15 years ago if you 
bought a British car - 'you want 
carpets? -that's extra"; 'you want 
knobs on the doors? - that's extra'. 
Nowadays they've all got electric 
windows, adjustable seats, and so 
on, because the competition has 
forced them to do that. 

Now what we've got is the 
situation where the PC market has 
grown in terms of its graphic 
capability and its sound capability. 
It's starting to catch up. 
JR: But in the PC market there is no 
standard, still. You have to go out 
and buy your computer in a box and 
you buy your sound card and then go 
out and buy your graphics card. 
WR: But some of them are getting 
together and putting packages out so 




16MHz '020 is old technology. Good 
God, if Apple can sell a machine with 
an '020 in there running at 16MHz 
for £900 then surely 
Commodore can sell one 
for half the price and 
still make a profit. 
That's why it 
seems unrea- 
sonable to 
charge 
£399 
for 
the 



A600. 
which is 
cheaper surface 
mount technology. 
JR: I guess the A600 costs 
so much at the moment because 
Commodore has to pay off the cost 
of converting its production lines over 
to surface mount technology. Once 
these costs are recovered, I can see 
the price of the A600 coming down 
to under £200. 

AS: You can get A600s in Germany 
for a third off the price here. Kelly 
Sumner (CBM's UK MD) was saying 
that that was because it doesn't 
include on-site maintenance as part 
of the deal there, and yet at the 
same time he was saying that the 
failure rate it had had so far was 
something like less than 1.5%. 
Whereas the 



difficult to blow the CIA chips. 
JH: Oh good, because I've blown 
loads of them in the past. 
WR: I wonder how many people 

actually bought a 500 Plus and 
might be hacked 
off. I think 




"The problem is that no-one is going to 

want to develop software for a 

configuration that only a small number of 

people possess" 



you don't have to do that. 

JH: Exactly, a lot of companies are 

selling PCs with these cards already 

in them. 

JR: At the end of the day it's usually 

the dealers who put them together. 

There's no reason why they can't do 

the same thing with a new Amiga. 

THE WORD ON THE A600 

MS: You can't do that with the A600 

though. 90% of users don't want the 

all-singing, all-dancing machine, they 

just want this capability in a base 

machine. 

JW: But they're not going to get it at 

that price; otherwise it wouldn't be a 

base machine. 

JR: What's going to have to happen if 

and when the new technology comes 

out, is that it's going to have to be in 

the high end machines first so that 

the software developers can develop 

for it. 

MS: The 68020 is not new 

technology: it's old, years old. The 



A500 Plus was 8.5% or so. 

JR: This is the major advantage of 

going over to surface mount. 

MS: That's true. It's physically much 

more robust. 

WR: But there are also 

disadvantages. I wonder how many 

people started with Kickstart 1.2 and 

then upgraded to 1.3 and... 

JR: The ROM is still socketed, so you 




The A600 - 
replacement for 
the A500 and first in 
a new range of Amigas 
for the '90s. But is it good 
enough to retain Commodore's 
in the market-place? 

Commodore lost a lot of street cred 
for that. It seemed to be half- 
hearted; it just slipped in; a lot of 
people bought it and they must have 
been really hacked off. 
JR: I think possibly that it just had to 
release the A500 Plus because it ran 
out of the old chips; it ran out of 1.3 
Kickstarts and Denises and what 
have you; and it didn't want to 
produce a new batch. The A500 Plus 
came out a lot earlier than expected. 
WR: Well that stinks of crisis 
management rather than planning. 
JR: Well the A500 was selling far 
higher than expectations, so all 
Commodore's planning went out the 
window. 

WR: But the punters in the street 
suffer, because they go out with their 
money and buy a new machine... 
JW: Oh, I don't think somebody who 
has bought an A500 Plus has 
suffered. It's a good machine. 
GW: But people are hacked off by 
the marketing strategy, not by the 
machine they've got. Because 
they've gone out and bought a box, 
and then suddenly a new one is out. 
JR: But then you get that in any 
market. You go out and buy a car, 
and then next week the company 
brings out a new car. It's inevitable; 
companies have to release new 
products and people will always get 
annoyed if they're the people who 
bought the old 

product a 



"/ wonder how many people actually 

bought a 500 Plus and might be hacked 

off. I think Commodore lost a lot of 

street cred for that" 



can still upgrade Kickstarts. The only 
other real problem that the A500s 
had was that it was very easy to 
blow CIA chips, and apparently 
there's now better protection on the 
A600 for them. It's now far more 



week before. 
JW: That's right. I've bought things 
and next week they've gone on 
special offer. 

MS: Still, the A600 was a bit of a 
joke wasn't it? 
AS: Why do you think that? 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



TALKING SHOP SPECIAL 



MS: The original machine was an 

A300. 

JH: It's written on the circuit board. 

MS: Yeah, so why market it as an 

A600 above the A500 to replace the 

A500. Why not carry on with the 

A500 and put the A600 out as a 

lower end machine? Keep the A500 

as it was and release a PCMCIA 

adaptor for it. 

JR: I think Commodore has dropped 

the A500 because producing a 

machine without surface mount is 

just too much trouble. 

MS: But it could produce the 




more you could get a 68030. 
JW: It's not a little bit more. We're 
talking about the Amiga market. 
WR: I'm talking about the A3000. 
JW: That's not a little bit more: 
that's £500 more. 
WR: Well they've come down to 
£1400, so somebody will start 
aggressively pricing them again. 
JW: OK let's say they're aggressively 
priced down to £1200. The new '020 
machine is aggressively priced down 
to £700 - you've still got a £500 
price difference. 

WR: But I'd rather save and 
pay the extra 



"I heard a quote from the president 

of Commodore US who said that most 

users don't want anything more than 

a 7MHz 68000" 



A500 using surface 

mount. 

JR: But why confuse the market by 

releasing two new machines at the 

same time? The A500 and A600 are 

basically not that different. They're 

both aimed at the same market. 

Because of the surface mount, the 

new A500 that you're proposing 

would be less expandable than the 

ordinary A500 anyway, in terms of 

internal expansions. 

MS: It could have gone for a 16MHz 

68000. 

AS: Why do you think it didn't? 

JR: Difficult. I think software 

incompatibility. Commodore is very 

scared of the STE-factor. That's the 

main thing. The STE came out and 

New Computer Express crucified it 

because it didn't run all the ST 

games. 

WR: I would have thought it would be 

a better idea to put an '020 in the 

A600 along with a fall-back mode. 

And that would have made all the 

games work... 

JR: You can never have a fall-back 

mode that works 100%. 

WR: Well that's a technical problem, 

that's not one I'd be concerned with, 

that's up to Commodore. 

JR: What it could have done is have 

a switchable 68000 which by default 

runs at slow speed, so you can boot 

up your games and they run slow. 

but from which you can run a 

program from Workbench to switch 

the chip to 16MHz mode. That would 

have been more sensible. 

MS: Which is what has been done in 

PCs for years. 

PRICE & PERFORMANCE 

WR: Which brings us back full circle 
to the first question. I would 
question anybody's sense in going 
out and buying a 68020 machine for 
under £1000 when for a little bit 



£500 and get a faster 
machine. 

JW: A lot of people will. 
JR: That will be the right sort of 
placing for the machines then. 
Nobody should moan and say 'why 
have they brought out this machine 
with an 020?' - because you've got 
the option of spending more and 
buying a machine with an '030. 
GW: It's filling a gap. 
JR: Yeah, it's just filling an obvious 
gap in the market. You've got a base 
machine with a 68000; then a 
machine with an '020 and a machine 
with an '030 - something for 
everyone. 

WR: But my argument follows on if 
you look at comparative markets. If 
you go back to when the Amiga first 
came out, it was a 68000, it had 
limited screen memory and limited 
RAM on board, OK, but it's still the 
same processor now. I would have 
thought that after seven years they 
would have got it a bit faster. Look at 
how the PC market has changed: you 
bought the XT running at God knows 
how slow! 

JW: What you're saying is you want a 
base machine that's as good as... 
WR: No, I'm saying it should have 
been faster. I think the new A600 
should have been at least a 68020. 
JR: Yeah, it should have been... 
perhaps it'll change it. 
MS: I think the STE-factor that you 
talked about, which is quite 
legitimate, was actually caused 
more, in Atari's case, by the new 
custom chips, which is exactly the 
same as with the A500 Plus. As 
soon as you put the Super Fat Agnus 
in there, some games just fall over. 
JR: It was actually very clever of 
Commodore to ensure that the Plus 
wasn't a disaster in the same way as 
the STE. 

AS: I heard a quote from the 
president of Commodore US who 



said that most users don't want 

anything more than a 7MHz 68000. 

GW: Well they're not being 

stimulated to want one. 

JW: Are they asked? If 90% of Amiga 

500s and A600s are sold to games 

players, what advantage can a better 

processor have for them? 

WR: Not everybody uses their 

Amigas just for games. 

JW: Yes, but 90% do. 

GW: But there's some sell through 

as well. You hook them by selling 

them a games machine, and then 

you try and educate them into other 

uses... 

JR: Kids are not going to be 

interested in a faster processor 

unless it makes XCopy run better! 

WR: I think that's naive to be 

honest. I work with kids all the time; 

and 90% of the kids I know like 

games and play games, but they're 

more concerned about serious 

applications. They use them for 

school work; they do their homework 

on them; they're working with them 

all day at school. Anything that can 

make it faster, make it more 

efficient, make their output look 

better, then it's got to be a plus. 

MS: If you look at the games coming 

out on a PC now, many of them need 

a minimum configuration of a 20Mb 

hard disk and a 386 processor. 

Whereas we're stuck in the Amiga 

market with a 68000 at 7MHz. 

Which is crap. 

WR: It's old. 

MS: It's old; it's outdated. 

WR: It's a starting point for the A600 

for the next how many years? Five 

years? Is it still going to have the 

same processor in five years time? 

JR: I doubt it very much. 

WR: Then why not change it now? 

MS: This is what Commodore should 

have done. 

JR: It can't do it now because it's 

only just been launched. 

JW: If you want a machine with an 

'020 you can buy one. 

MS: But to get it as the base 

machine... 

JW: Everybody's saying they want a 

base machine with an '030 in it, but 

they don't want to pay out the money 

MS: No, but certainly an '020 at 

16MHz doesn't cost that much more. 

WR: But look at comparative 

markets - what's the entry level for a 

PC? XTs have gone. 

JW: But base machines are sold to 

games players. 

WR: Well if you want to label our 

machine as a games machine... 

JW: It is! 

WR: I don't think it is. 

JW: It doesn't matter what you think 

it is, it is. 

GW: When you say they're sold as 

games machines, are they perhaps 

sold like train sets used to be? Dad 

goes out and buys a train set 

supposedly for the kids but Dad uses 



it to play games, but what do the 
kids do with it? 

JW: They're sold to kids as games 
machines; to the parents for their 
kids. It's changing now with this new 
point-of-sale thing. That's changing 
because the centre point is CDTV, 
and there's all this software 
arranged around it, and there's lots 
of applications and information CDs 
there. 

The actual marketing of the base 
Amiga is changing, but it's still going 
to sell it in packs later on. The A600 
at the moment is being sold in the 
Cartoon Classics pack. It's for 
games! 

WR: It also did the educational 
package, which sold extremely well. 
JW: It didn't sell extremely well. 
WR: It did. 

JW: It didn't. There were nowhere 
near as many numbers sold as of the 
ordinary A500. It sold a few 
thousand, but the A500 has sold 
millions. 



CONSOLE COMPETITION 

MS: I think something else we've got 
to look at if you say the Amiga is a 
games playing machine, is the 
console market, which is the true 
games playing market these days. 
The Super Nintendo and the Mega 
Drive both leave the Amiga standing, 
and both cost less than £150. Why 
would you buy a games machine with 
less power for more money? 




At half its old price, the A3000 is 
now a very attractive proposition 

JW: I don't know but people are. 
MS: I work closely with a few shops, 
and their main sales now are in 
Super Nintendo and Mega Drive. 
Sales of Amigas have virtually ground 
to a halt, especially with the A600. It 
couldn't sell the A600 when it first 
came out; now it's starting to gain 
acceptance. If people want to play 
games they buy cartridge-based 
consoles. 

JR: The only thing is that in the 
console market games cost £40 a 
time, and they're not readily 
copyable. The other thing of course 
is that the variety and range of 



18 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



TALKING SHOP SPECIAL 




games on the Amiga is much better. 
MS: But the vast majority of games 
on the Amiga are rubbish, especially 
when you compare them to the likes 
of Sonic or Mario. They're only £10 
more, but the kids will just play them 
and play them and play them. 
There's so much more in them. 
AS: OK, can we assume for a 
moment that after Christmas 93 the 
games market for the Amiga has 
plummetted. Basically people are 
buying SNES and Mega Drives. 
Where does that leave the Amiga? 
JW: It leaves the Amiga 600 dead. 
AS: So, if we had a 
scenario where the Amiga 
wasn't being bought as 
a games machine 
anymore, do you 
think that leaves the 
Amiga as a sort of 
poor man's Mac? If you 
look at the Mac as being 
the DTP machine par 
excellence, could you see the Amiga 
as being (fie video and graphics 
machine? 

JW: With the right software, and with 
the hardware we were talking about 
right at the very beginning. That's 
exactly what would have to happen if 
the games market fell through. 
Commodore would have to scrap the 
A600, probably have to scrap the 
'020-based machine, and go A3000 
upwards. 

MS: I think what it has also got to do 
is improve Workbench considerably, 
improve the whole of Intuition. 
Intuition is a great Idea, but even 
now it's nowhere near as good as 
the Mac interface. 

JW: Also third party software has got 
to get better. 

JR: That's not true! It's the software 
that uses it! The actual support 
under Intuition, particularly if you 
have Kickstart 2, is there, it's just 
that the software companies are not 
using it; they're not following the 
style guide. 

JW: Kelly Sumner made this point 
talking about the new '020 machine 
and compatibility. He made the point 
that they're testing everything, and 
developers still aren't using the 
operating system. 

JR: From a developer's point of view I 
know that Commodore is actually 
pushing very hard in that direction at 
the moment. It's doing a lot of work 
on that. 

MS: It's all very well saying the 
operating system's got all these 
fancy features and extras, but at the 
grass roots level it's still not open- 
ended. Commodore should have 
come down a lot harder, a lot earlier, 
enforcing guidelines, like Apple did. If 
you get a Mac and you type 
[Command]-0, that's 'open a file', 
always. 

JW: That's easy to say in hindsight, 
but it didn't happen. 



JR: It's being retrospectively fitted 
now to the software. If you look at 
the guidelines now there are 
actually instructions as to how your 
menus should be laid-out and so 
forth. 

MS: Why aren't all of them doing it? 
WR: But some of them are. If you 
look at the inclusion of ARexx, there 
are a lot of software houses now 
writing macros in ARexx that are built 
into the software, and that's an 
example... 



JW: If anybody wants to learn about 
their Amiga, wants to know how it 
works, what it can do, what it can't 
do, then they should buy the Fred 
Fish disks, use everything and read 
everything. You may not find them 
useful again, but you'll learn 
something. 



THE POWER OF AREXX 

JR: Is there anything like ARexx on 
the Mac that enables you to 
integrate packages so easily? 
MS: Well, there is now, but it's not 
as easy as with ARexx. 

"If anybody wants to learn JW: ■ know il sounds like 

about their Amiga, wants to know 

how it works, what it can do, what it 

can't do then they should buy the 

Fred Fish disks" 



PD PULLING POWER 

AS: So are there any other reasons 
why the Amiga will still sell despite 
the consoles? 

JR: Public domain software is a 
legitimate reason for buying a 
computer over a console. 
MS: But you only find out about PD 
once you get into computing. 
JH: Most new users won't know 
anything about it. 
WR: And unfortunately PD still, 
despite the fact there's some really 
good stuff, has this tacky image 
about it. 

JW: There are more than 100 Amiga 
PD libraries, all of them coining it in. 
If you look at PD for the ST. the Mac, 
and even the PC, it doesn't compare. 
MS: Mind you the PD houses are 
starting to crash now. 
JW: Yeah, there's too many of them. 
The point is there aren't 
so many libraries 
because there is so 
much decent software; 
there are so many 
libraries because so 
many people want what 
there is. 

JR: The PD libraries are 
also going to have 
problems when the CD- 
ROM arrives. You'll be 
able to get a whole PD 
library for £20! 
GW: There's just the 
transit time of getting 
PD on to a CD. 
JR: This is it; there are always going 
to be people who want this week's 
demos, and failing getting a modem 
and downloading them, the only way 
to do it is through a PD library. 
GW: I think PD is probably a 
marketing strategy that Commodore 
has missed. I think it has seen that 
now, though. 




I'm biased towards 

DTP, but the Genies 

in Professional 

Page are a perfect 

example of what 

ARexx is capable of. It's 

stunning what you can do. 

AS: What can you do? 
JW: You can automate page make- 
up. It's as simple as that. You can 
do it once, and it's done for all time. 
You just tell it which files to load, 
and it puts them into boundary boxes 
and it's done for you. You just press 
the burton and it's done. Things like 
if you need various graphics arranged 
on a page and you want them to 
automatically go into the boxes of 
the size you've drawn them, and then 
you want the whole thing to be 
scaled down to 50% of that size and 
then moved and then copied over on 
to a little panel on another page on 
another part of the publication or 
something... it comes with a whole 
bunch of them written for you. But 
there are also programs. If you 
wanted to do what I was just talking 
about you could write your own ARexx 
script; so you've got to learn about 
ARexx which means you've got to 
learn about programming, which 

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ARexx reinforces the Amiga's 
multitasking capabilities 

frightens people. 

MS: People do say 'I can't program' 
without even thinking about it. 
JW: That's right, they just assume 
that programming is something that 
only clever people do. But ARexx 



PRODUCTS OF 
THE YEAR 

AS: I'd like to ask everybody what 
the most exciting product they have 
come across this year is. 
WR: A bit of software called 
MicroMeasure. It works with a 
genlock and a video camera, and it 
enables you to calibrate the screen 
and to record movement, time, 
distance... I like it because unlike 
most software it's completely 
divergent. What you use it for is up 
to you. So, for example, you could 
view someone throwing a discus 
and put markers on them, you could 
analyse the body movement. You 
could put it on dancers, insects 
moving across foliage. It's a very 
clever bit of software. 
MS: Progressive Peripherals' '040 
accelerator for the A500. Software- 
wise, the best package I've used 
this year is Professional Calc. but 
the third party hardware developers 
are well in advance of the third party 
software developers. 
JR: Hardware-wise I think the new 
AD516 stereo 16-bit 8 track sound 
card, which is pretty amazing. For 
software, the new version of 
NComm 2 for the A600 is pretty ' 
good. It supports the credit card slot 
for paying for on-line services. 
GW: I suppose the AVideo 24 card, 
because it's cheap and it does the 
job, even though you have to plug it 
inside the machine. I think it's an 
interesting piece of kit that maybe 
ought to be bundled with 
professional systems. 
JW: ARexx. I think it's the most 
underrated, unknown piece of 
software. It's tremendously exciting. 



makes it very easy. 

JR: The advantage is that once 

you've learnt ARexx you've learnt how 

to control just about every 

productivity package for the Amiga. 

AS: Do you think Commodore should 

be bundling ARexx properly with the 

A600? 

JR: It is bundled. 

AS: Not completely... 

JW: What's not bundled are the 

manuals. The users don't even know 

they've got ARexx. 

IS CDTV THE KEY TO 
COMMODORE'S FUTURE? 

AS: Commodore is about to put 450 
point-of-sale units in high street 
shops like Dixons. At the centre is 
the CDTV with keyboard, flanked by 
about 30, 35 titles. Beneath it is the 
standard 600 and the 600 with a 
hard drive. I think it's quite 
interesting that CDTV is taking the 
centre stage. That it's now the 

continued on page 21 



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TALKING SHOPS FECI A L 



continued from page 19 

leading Amiga brand. That's the way 
it is being positioned. Linking that 
into what I was saying earlier about 
the possible demise of the Amiga 
games market, do you think 
Commodore's long term thinking is 
that of the Amiga CDTV computer as 
its saviour? 

JW: Commodore doesn't actually say 
that, but I think everything it shows 
confirms that. 
WR: But isn't it typical of 
Commodore, for something that's 
going to be the future, and be 
revolutionary, to put the old Amiga 
with a 68000 into CDTV. 
GW: And 1.3 based, at that, 
WR: Yes. If it's going to be the biz, 
why chuck a seven year old machine 
in at the centre of it? 
GW: And a Welcome disk that tells 
you how to switch the machine on! 
AS: Do you think that it would be a 
sensible move to take a 500 along 
and come away with a CDTV 
computer? What are the benefits? 
JR: Well you're getting an extra 
year's guarantee! 

AS: Can you easily add upgrades to 
CDTV? Can you hook printers and 
memory and so on? 
JR: Yeah, it's got all the standard 
Amiga ports. It's got two internal 
expansion ports. One of them is a 
video port in which the modulator 
usually fits, so obviously it's got an 
internal modulator. You can take that 
out and put in a genlock. 
JW: Do you think it's this kind of 
hardware that will sell it? 
JR: It's the software that will sell it. I 
know there are several companies 
doing very big CDTV projects: it's just 
that they're all going to appear 
between now and Christmas. They've 
all been waiting for the A570 to 
launch. 

JW: So while these titles are going to 
sell the CDTV, they are also going to 
sell A570s to A500 owners, and 
they're going to sell A670s to A600 
owners... 

WR: What about A2000 owners? 
JR: Well you can already get a CD- 
ROM that will fit inside the A2000. 
JW: What are developers using? 
JR: The Toshiba. 

JW: That's the one that works with 
almost everything. 

JR: Well, no, the only thing it doesn't 
run is software that calls the CDTV 
libraries, the CDTV ROMS, because 
they aren't on the SCSI card. 
Unfortunately all the good titles do. 
There is a way around this which is 
to produce a software emulator for 
the CDTV device. Such a thing does 
exist; but I can't talk about it. 
MS: You just did. 
JR: The problem is licensing; the 
code belongs to Commodore, and if 
you're doing a CDTV compatible 
drive you've got to license the 



code from Commodore. 

GW: Talking about emulations, that 

could well be another thing that's 

selling Amigas. 

JR: Commodore's latest brochures 

put a lot of emphasis on the 

emulators, particularly A-Max. 

AS: Do you know of any developers 

who are bringing out serious 

applications on CD-ROM? 

JR: Yes. For example New Horizons 

are doing ProWrite, Flow, Design 

Works and whatever on a disc, so 

there's a mini office station on a CD. 

AS: On the PC, for instance, Corel 

Draw is out. 

JR: Well this will be the favoured way 

of distributing software. It's a lot 

cheaper to produce one CD than it is 

say ten or eleven disks if you've got 

a big package. Plus, of course, it is 

secure. So I would not be surprised if 

Pro Page or PageStream or whatever 

come out on CD, or at least become 

optionally available on CD. 

MS: What's to stop people pirating 

from CDTV? 

JR: Audio. You can pirate the games, 

but you can't get the CD sound. If 

you look at pirate bulletin boards, 

you'll see things like CDTV 

Lemmings, but they've got no sound. 

JW: I don't think people will really 

appreciate the CD audio until they've 

heard it. 

AS: I can't see any software coming 

out on credit card, because the unit 

price is so expensive. Who's going to 

develop on something with a high 

initial cost? 

JR: That's probably the case for a 

RAM card. But ROM cards are going 

to be no more expensive to produce 

than a standard console cartridge. 

Because it is essentially the same 

technology - all it is is a surface 

mounted ROM chip. 



before we see a large base of really 
good CDTV software. 
JR: Another thing is that, at the 
moment, there is no way for amateur 
programmers to access CDTV. That 
will be fixed when AMOS Professional 
comes out, which will have a CDTV 
extension. With this you'll be able to 
write your own custom audio player 




CDTV - heralding a new generation of 
home and productivity software? 

or Karaoke player. It's great fun 
playing around with CDTV as a sort of 
programmable CD player. 
GW: When you talk about putting Pro 
Page 3 on CD, how much memory 
can you stick in a CDTV, because 
you're going to need a fair bit? 
JR: The base machine is not 
expandable, but you can now get the 
2Mb Agnus chip to give 2Mb of Chip 
RAM inside the CDTV. 

There's also the Blizzard Board 
which is an internal thing that sticks 
on the 68000 chip. That will give it a 
double speed 68000 and up to 8Mb 
of Fast RAM. 




'The software I've seen on CDTV is not 
good enough at the moment" 



AS: Isn't that going to 

be much more expensive than an 

equivalent CD? 

JR: This is why I think the credit card 

slot is mainly going to be used for 

hardware expansion. 

AS: Jason, would you buy yourself an 

A570? 

JH: I've been thinking for a long time 

about buying a CDTV, but at the 

moment it's not the sort of thing I 

need. The software I've seen on 

CDTV is just not good enough, at the 

moment. I've seen a lot of CDTV 

software and the only disc that I 

could say I've enjoyed playing with is 

Japan World. 

JW: I think it will be after Christmas 



THE PC /AMIGA WAR 

AS: Has the PC caught up with the 

Amiga, and does it represent better 

value for money? 

JR: No; no. 

MS: Yes; yes. 

JR: It depends what you want out of 

the machine. At the end of the day 

they are just boxes that do jobs. And 

if it does the job you want it to do at 

the price you want to pay then it's 

value for money. Personally, I've got 

a 486 in the office which is sitting 

around doing nothing, just wasting 

our money. 

MS: How much did you pay for it? 



JR: About £1000. Yeah, it's a very 
fast machine, but I don't use it. 
AS: If somebody out there has a 
choice between Commodore's new 
'020-based machine and the 
equivalent PC for the price, at least a 
decent 386DX, which should they go 
for? 

JW: The question they have to ask 
first is 'what do I 
want to do with it?' 
JR: A computer is 
only a tool for 
running software. 
Software is far more 
important than 
hardware. 
AS: Put it another 
way then: what 
features does the 
Amiga have that one 
should buy it for in 
preference to a PC? 
JW: On the 
applications side of 
things, doesn't it 
turn into a Windows 
versus Workbench sort of argument? 
JR: Yes. I find Workbench far more 
productive than Windows, and I use 
both of them quite a lot. 
MS: But there's nothing like the DTP 
application Quark XPress or Word For 
Windows for the Amiga. 
JW: You're talking about 'killer' 
applications. 

JR: I prefer running productivity 
software on a standard A500 Plus to 
running it on a 486 with Windows. 
It's a better system; Workbench is 
easier to use. 
MS: Workbench is, but the 
productivity software for it isn't, 
JR: It depends what you want to do. 
For example, look at word 
processing. I can use Protext on the 
Amiga or I can use Word For 
Windows on the PC. If I'm just writing 
a short answer for Amiga Shopper it 
doesn't make any difference - I can 
do the job equally well with either. 
JW: Looking at the software side of 
things, we've all got our areas that 
we specialise in; in an ideal world 
what piece of software would we 
choose to do that job all the time? 
To start the ball rolling, I'd be using 
Quark XPress, on the Mac. 
JH: I'd be using CuBase on the Mac 
for sequencing. 
MS: Microsoft Word. 
JR: I'd be using what I'm currently 
using on the Amiga. I'm happy. 
GW: I'd be using a Cray. 
JR: But PC hardware is very cheap. 
PC software isn't. If you're looking at 
packages like Word For Windows, 
it's, what, £399? 
JW: Quark XPress is £790. 
JR: So any advantage you've got in 
the platform price is immediately lost 
on the software. So unless you're 
assuming that people are going out 
and getting their pirate copies of the 
software, people are going to have to 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



TALKING SHOP SPECIAL 



buy the packages that they want to 

use. 

MS: We know realistically that a lot 

of people do pirate it. But even so, 

the difference In price is... to buy an 

equivalent to a 386 PC you'd have to 

buy an A3000. 

JW: No that's rubbish! 

JR: You can get good performance 

out of an A500. 

MS: What! Show me an application 



JW: It's a games machine. 
JR: It's a games machine; it's a 
video machine. 

MS: It's also a hobbyists' machine. 
It's something you can mess about 
with. That's its greatest strength. 
And it has got the best multitasking 
around. Unfortunately that's where 
Commodore has really flopped, 
because it's not really pushed this 
factor in its advertising. 




"Why not concentrate on the 

emulator boards and use everyone else's 

killer applications?" 



that performs like Word. 

WR: It takes 15Mb doesn't it? 

MS: It's big, yes. 

JW: The hardware that some of this 

software requires is expensive. 

JR: All I'm saying is that there's 

nothing really wrong with the basic 

machine. The system I've got at the 

moment is an A500 Plus with 2Mb of 

Chip RAM and 4Mb of Fast RAM, and 

a 52Mb hard disk. Now that set-up is 

ideal for productivity work on the 

Amiga. 

JW: So are we saying the only killer 

application on the Amiga is 

Workbench? 

JR: There are a lot of good 

applications that are close to 'killer', 

but I wouldn't say they were at 'killer' 

status yet; things like Art Department 

Professional. 

JW: But that's what the machine 

needs. 

WR: It also multitasks well. 

JR: That's the main thing. 

JW: What it needs to sell it into the 

power user market or even the 

corporate market is one killer 

application. 

JR: Why not concentrate on the 

emulator boards and use everyone 

else's killer applications? 

JW: That could be it. 

JR: I don't think there really is any 

point in producing say the most 

amazing Amiga desktop publishing or 

most amazing Amiga word 

processing or spreadsheet package, 

because these packages exist on the 

Mac and on the PC. 

GW: But if you've got to spend £300 

on an emulator and £700 on 

software, you might as well buy a PC. 

JR: It's cheaper than spending the 

money on the PC and the software if 

you've already got the Amiga. 

MS: By definition you've got the 

Amiga. 

JR: The point is, if you only want to 

run that sort of software, then there 

is no point in buying an Amiga 

anyway. The Amiga is a specialist 

machine. 



JW: Part of the problem is that the 
general user doesn't understand 
multitasking. That's not their fault; 
it's our fault that they don't know 
about multitasking. And of course, to 
multitask effectively you need more 
memory and a faster processor. 
JR: It's amazing how well you can 
multitask on a standard A500. 
WR: It's amazing how quickly it 
slows down as well! 
JW: It does depend on the 
application. A lot of software doesn't 
multitask properly, and will basically 
grab the system and slow everything 
down, and won't do what it's 
supposed to be doing. It's supposed 
to let the processor go; some of 
them say 'I'll just keep hold of it in 
case I don't get it back'. 

THE BEST YEAR SINCE '85 

AS: Where do you think we are in 

terms of the Amiga's development? 

Is this one of the most 

exciting years there has 

been since 1985? 

JH: Yes, it's just 

starting now. For 

seven years the 

Amiga has been 

pretty static. Now in the 

space of say two years, 

we've got Workbench 

2.04 which is a huge advancement, 

we've got 24-bit cards, 16-bit 

sampling cards, ARexx. Things are 

just starting now. 

AS: Are you getting more value for 

your money now? 

JH: That is the case with all 

technology, all sorts of things. The 

price of technology drops, but you 

still pay pretty much the same price 

for something, although the product 

is actually a lot better. It's like HiFI 

equipment. 

JR: People think that Commodore 

has been totally static since 1985, 

and hasn't really done anything 

except new Agnus chips and new 

Denise chips, very minor changes. 



JH: The enhanced chip set was 
designed in 1985. Jay Miner said 
that the chip set was done. 
JR: The only problem was that the 
original designs for the original chips 
were lost. It's true! When it did the 
enhanced chips, Commodore virtually 
had to reverse-engineer its own chips 
and hack them, which is why the 
enhanced chip set wasn't a major re- 
build because it didn't have time. 
That's why it has taken it so long to 
do anything - because the original 
designs were lost. 
WR: I'm disappointed. I would have 
thought that, after seven years, for a 
machine which at the time it was 
introduced was quite revolutionary... 
JW: Quite revolutionary? It was 
stunning! 

WR: What I would say though is that 
in the last seven years the 
competition might not have caught 
up but it has come damned close. 
AS: Where has Commodore failed to 
seize the opportunities? 
WR: It has failed to build upon what 
it has. It's failed to take advantage 
of the increase in graphic power. 
JW: 'Failed' is probably the wrong 
word. 

WR: It's failed to increase the 
processing speed. 
JW: Ah, but the Amiga hasn't failed 
to sell. 

WR: I'm not talking about sales this 
year or last year or the year before, 
I'm talking about the market-place 
that it is having to look at in the next 
five years. 

JW: You can't use the words 'Amiga' 
and 'failed' in the same sentence! 
WR: ...Commodore has failed to 
build on what it had, and all it's done 
is release a machine which is going 
to be the main seller for the next four 




"But if you've got to spend £300 on an 

emulator and £700 on software, you 

might as well buy a PC" 



years and which is really not that 
much better than the one it had 
seven years ago. And that's the 
sadness. 

JW: I think we are forgetting that 
Commodore is a business and its 
ultimate aim is to make money. 
JR: If it can't sell it then it'll change 
it, it'll make it better. 
JW: For the last three years it has 
made all the right decisions. The 
A500 Plus is an exception; I think 
there's more behind that than can or 
should be talked about. I don't know 
if you can remember when it went 
from the A1000 to the A500, but 
everyone said 'crap machine - that's 



the end of Commodore'. It only 
lasted for about six weeks - exactly 
the same as people have said about 
the A600. I think you'll find that what 
will happen is that it will sell on the 
on-site maintenance - even though 
it's not needed! 

MS: That's the great thing about it. 
Commodore has done a good thing. 
JW: I think that's going to sell it, that 
and the low price - if it sells that 
means that the software and 
hardware houses will develop for it, 
and it will just go on from there. If it 
doesn't happen, then Commodore 
has to do something about it. But if 
it sells, why should it spend more 
money on something that may not 
sell? It's using a proven system. 
WR: It depends on what your 
philosophy is. IBM's philosophy is 
that every year it will bring out a 
machine based on a processor that 
is twice as fast, and at a similar 
price. That's its business philosophy. 
JW: But they're in different markets. 
WR: It's still aiming to sell 
machines. My argument is that 
seven years on Commodore has 
produced another machine which is 
virtually identical to what it had 
seven years ago. That's the bottom 
line. I think it should have looked at 
something that's going to be the 
flagship for the next five years, that's 
got a chance of being more exciting. 
GW: What we don't know is whether 
it has one up its sleeves or not. 
WR: OK, but how many of you here 
thought 'Wow! what a great move' 
when they saw the A600? I bet most 
of you didn't. 

GW: To me a machine like that is no 
use anyway, for what I do. But then 
I'm not a games player, I'm not in 
that market. 

JW: We've been complaining about 
the A600 and saying it shouldn't 
be the base machine... 
MS: It shouldn't be the 
base machine at 
£400. At that price 
you should be able 
to get a 16MHz '020 
machine, with at least 
1Mb. With surface 
mount technology Commodore could 
do that. The A600 would be fine as a 
base machine and then something 
like the A500 at £400 with a 16MHz 
'020 minimum could be re- 
introduced. Then we're talking 
serious competition with PCs. 
JR: Traditionally Amigas have three 
machines: a low end, a mid-range, 
and a high range. That's not enough. 
If you look at PCs or Macs you've got 
a whole range of machines. 
AS: Do you think Commodore will 
address that? 

JR: We'll just have to wait and see. 
AS: Well, I hope Commodore does it 
soon, because the Macs and PCs of 
this world are getting more powerful 
and less pricey by the day. C0 



22 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



PC EMULATORS 



Seeing blue ? 

Don't even consider buying 

a PC when you can turn 

your Amiga into one! 




Two computers 
under the bonnet 

Tap into the wealth 
of PC business software 

Beat the PC owners at 
their own game 



From PD programs 
to the state of the art 
hardware emulators, we 
examine all the PC options 




i 

Microsoft 

Windows.. 

Version 3.1 



Copyright © MtaCDBOfi CorporMiort 1985-1992. 
All Rights Reserved. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



23 



PC EMULATORS 






PRETENDERS 



Want to take advantage of 
PC software on your 
Amiga? - With a PC 
emulator you can have 
the best of both worlds... 
Wilf Rees checks out the 
pick of the PC emulators, 
from the roller skates to 
the Rolls Royces 



So, you've got an Amiga, 
and of course you are 
happy with It, but there will 
always be times when the 
thought of that other fraternity who 
keep referring to their PCs will 
cross your mind. What with those 
references to 386s, 486s, VGA, and 
all the other jargon synonymous 
with PCs, you could be forgiven for 
thinking that the grass is always 
greener. Claims such as, "Industry 
Standard", and "stacks of 
software", and "Commodore what?" 
are designed to impress, but what 
we really need to do is ask whether 
or not we want to emulate a PC, 
and what benefits doing so will 
achieve. 



"It may well he that 
you want to access 
the vast amount of 
additional software 
which PC emulation 



would offer. 



H 



TAKE YOUR WORK HOME 

I'm sure there are many of you 
reading this article who use PCs 
daily at work, who then troop off 
home to their Amiga to zap aliens, 
produce the parish magazine, re- 
orchestrate Debussy's La Mer, or 
write to Amiga Shopper for Amiga 
Answers. 

A good PC emulator would 



enable you to keep ahead of the 
creep at the next desk who types 
with all 10 fingers and is full of 
smart advice on how to enhance 
your performance. You can sneak a 
disk into your pocket, and carry on 
working on a report or assignment 
at home, giving him that famous 
one-upmanship salute at the 



appropriate time. 

It may well be that you 
just want to access the vast 
amount of additional 
software which PC 
emulation would offer, or 
that you want to familiarise 
yourself with MS-DOS and 
the WIMP environment, 
rapidly expanding in the PC 
world. Certainly there are 
more PC users than Amiga 
users, and from someone 
who uses PCs regularly as 
well as Amigas, my advice would be 
to check out a PC, so you can have 
an idea of the sort of software which 
can be run on a PC. 

SCANNING THE FIELD 

Of course, you don't have to buy a 
PC to make use of the software, a 
PC emulator for your Amiga will 
suffice. 

So what is there to choose from? 
Over the last few years, the number 

(ontinued on page 26 




If you buy one of the bridgeboards, 
such as the 2088, 2086, or the 
Golden Gate, don't think the 
expense stops there... you'll also 
need plug-in cards to achieve the 
best results. Illustrated is a hard 
disk controller for the Commodore 
boards, along with a memory card 
to extend the 8088 up to 640K, 
enabling recent larger packages to 
run. The VGA card will give you the 
best quality output, but if this is 
your choice, remember you'll need 
a VGA or multisync monitor 



STOP PRESS»STOP PRESS 



When I was researching this article Commodore would only indicate that its 386 card was nearing completion. When 
I Informed It that, as far as I was concerned, the AT 2086 was therefore still its flagship, it must have had second 
thoughts, because in the post the following morning were the specifications for the new board, together with the 
information that it is being designed and manufactured by Vortex, along with a sister board for the A600. So, here 
are the specifications as supplied: 



Processor 80386sx 

Clock speed 16MHz or 20MHz (Choice of speed) 
Coprocessor Optional 80387sx coprocessor supported 
Memory Expandable to 8Mb on board (256K x 4 or 

1Mb x 4 page mode ZIPS) 
Floppy disks Supports up to two floppy drives from the 

following: 

• One PC-only external drive (3.5" or 5.25") 

• One or two PC-only internal drives of the same type: 

• 3.5" 720Kb/1.44Mb PC 

• 3.5" 880Kb Amiga 

• 3.5" 880KD/1.76 dual speed Amiga 

• 5.25" High density PC 

• 5.25" Low Density PC 

• One shared 3.5" Amiga drive (DfO: or Dfl:) 

Card type Uses the Amiga (100-pin), PC/AT and 
PC/XT buses and occupies one of the two 



combination bridgeboard slots. 

• Video display IBM PC/AT MDA Monochrome 80x20 
text mode emulation 

• IBM PC/AT CGA Colour 80x25 and 40x25 text mode 

• IBM PC/AT CGA Colour graphics 640x200 x 2, and 
320x200 x 4 

• Multiple simultaneous displays supported in Amiga 
windows 

• Keyboard IBM PC/XT Keyboard emulation using Amiga 
keyboard 

• Parallel port IBM PC/AT Compatible Centronics port 
emulation (printer only) using the Amiga's parallel or 
serial port. Only one processor at a time may use 
this port. 

• ROM 64Kb AT compact BIOS 

• Interprocessor communication 128Kb shared memory, 
ability for PC to interrupt Amiga and vice-versa 

• Power 2.5Amps @ 5.0V 

Commodore tells me the board will be selling for around £250. This does add a new complexion to your decisions. I 
advise that if you are about to plunge into buying a PC emulator, you wait until a full-blown review can give you a 
better picture of the Commodore's performance, and then judge for yourself. 

Another one to look out for Is the newly announced Vortex 468 emualtor. We've not had a chance to look at this 
yet, but be assured we will and a full report will be appearing soon. In the mean time, check out the news pages for 
more details. 



4 A AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



A NEW GENERATION OF POWER TOOLS FOR AMIGA!! 




Enlarged data storage 

A. BC-2008MA: 8MB RAM card for Amiga 2000/3000 (only 13 cm x 7.8 cm) 

B. BC-10MIA: 10MB RAM card for A500 w.Gary board. The biggest Ram card in the 

world, (only 8.7 cm x 12.3 cm) 

C. BC-6MIA: 6MB RAM card for A500 w. Gary board (only 8.7 cm x 7.8 cm) 

D. BC-2MIA: 2MB RAM card for A500 w. Gary board (only 8.7 cm x 5 cm) 

E. BC-1MIA: Flexible 1MB RAM card for A500 withGary board. Can be combined 

with extlsing 512KB card and our 2M, 6M RAM cards. 

Basic RAM expansion 

F. BC-1M1A + : 1MB RAM expansion for A500+ . 

G. BC-512MI & H. BC-512MIA: 512KB RAM card for A500 

Efficient upgrading 

I. BC-BS: Boot selector, No Mach-switch needed. Drive selection by mouse click. 
J. BC-KS: Kickstart-ROM switch. Kickstart selection by keyboard. 

Input and pointing 

K. BC-SSP: Stereo sound sampler 

Built-in amplifier. Switch for input source selection. 
L,M, BC-TKI/BC-TKP: Tracker Pen for IBM PCs and Amiga/Atari. Can be used as Pen- 
mouse or Mini-Trackball. 
Resolution: 250 dpi on Atari/Amiga 

50-1250 dpi on IBM PCs and compatibles. 
N.O.P.Q, BC-MS1/BC-MT1/BC-MS2/BC-MS3: Mouse and Trackball for Amiga, Atari, 

IBM PCs and compatibles. 

Video Devices: 

R. BC-TVM:TV RF-modulator with sound input 

S. BC-GLK: Genlock for Amiga Computer 



Bus converter 

T. BC-520CV: Bus converter for A500/A500+ 

Expansion slot for A500/A500+ to use A2000 interface 

AT Bus slot for bridge board 

86PIN pass-through Bus for A5O0/A50O+ interface. 



• Full 1 year warranty. 

• Hot Line: Solutions for technical problems 
within 36 hours. 

• Short-notice delivery. 

Distributors Wanted! 

OEM Welcome! 

All brand names are registered trademarks of 
their owners. 

^^^ TM 

BIO-CON TAIWAN CORP. 

3RD Fl, Lucky Tower 235, Lung Chiang Rd. Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. 
TEL; 886-2-5016744, 5092334 FAX: 886-2-5010341 



PC EMULATORS 



continued from page 24 

of options has grown considerably. 
These options fall into two distinct 
categories, software based 
emulators, and hardware and 
software emulators. 




The KCS Powerboard: If you don't 
have a GVP hard drive, and you don't 
fancy taking your Amiga to bits, then 
this is the one. It simply plugs into 
the expansion slot under your A500, 
or, with the adaptor shown in the 
picture, fits Into the A2000/A3000 

THE SOFT OPTIONS 

The software-only options worth 
addressing are: Transformer, IBeM 
and PCTask. The two former 
packages are both available in the 
public domain whereas PCTask is 
licensed to Chris Hames. 

Transformer is by far the most 
popular of the two PD packages, 



"... forget any of 

the disk-based 

options unless time 



a 



is of no concern. 



originally released by Commodore, 
but so dreadful that it took several 
revisions by capable users to make it 
anything near acceptable. 
Transformer is a PC-AT emulator with 
a Norton system info benchmark of 



0.2 on a basic Amiga 500. It's cheap 
and cheerful, but tediously slow, only 
supports MDA (monochrome), 
doesn't have hard disk support, 
mouse support or sound support, 
and there is no documentation. It is 
really only suitable for text 

processing and 
DOS operations. To 
be honest, I got a 
little fed up with it 
crashing too often, 
but, you pays yer 
money... 

IBeM is 
marginally more 
stable than 
Transformer, and 
clocks in with 
Norton a shade 
faster at 0.3. MDA 
and CGA screen 
modes are supported, and linked 
with MessyDos (PD MS-DOS filing 
system), it enables your Amiga to 
access and write to PC formatted 
720K disks. I prefer IBeM to 
Transformer, but it really is very slow 
on screen updating, and offers the 



has a Norton benchmark of 1.8 on 
the Amiga 3000, 0.4 on an Amiga 
500. CGA and MDA support are 
provided, along with hard disk, serial 
and parallel ports and mouse 
support. Sound is not supported. I 
had no compatibility 
problems, and a ^^ mmmmmm 

PCTask took 
advantage of the G 
Force 030 
accelerator in my 
2000, speeding it 
up considerably. 
PCTask is also 
capable of 
multitasking, 
offering you the 
chance to move 
back and forth 
between your Amiga 
and PC software. 
PCTask is definitely 
the best choice of 
the three software options, and 
extremely well supported with read- 
me documentation. But even PCTask 
is laboriously slow, and if you are 
considering any kind of graphics 



"If you really want 
to explore the 

possibilities of PC 
emulation... look at 

the hardware and 



n 



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Desktop publishing with the KCS Power Board. Unfortunately there's 
no genuine VGA colour, due to the ISA bus not being supported on my 
A2000. A shame really, as this is a good value for money card which 
gave virtually no problems 



same limited support for peripherals 
as Transformer does. 

PCTask is in quite a different 
category to the other two, reflecting 
its license status, rather than PD. It 



emulation, I think you can really 
forget any of these disk-based 
options, that is unless time is of no 
concern. 

If you want to really explore the 



possibilities of PC emulation, then 
the best option is to look at the 
hardware and software combinations 
on the market. 

HARD AND SOFT OPTIONS 

The choice is 
^^^^^^^^ m growing, but there 
are still only a few 
to consider: KCS 
PowerBoard, AT- 
Once, Commodore 
A2088 PC-XT 
Bridgeboard, 
Commodore A2286 
PC/AT Bridgeboard. 
GVP HD8+PC286. 
Vortex Golden Gate 
386SX. 

Of the six 
mentioned, they do 
not all fall as 
automatic options. 
KCS and AT-Once fit 
into the Amiga 500 and A500 Plus; 
the A2088, A2286 and Golden Gate 
only go into an A2000 or A3000; 
and the GVP is suitable only to 
owners of a GVP HD8+ or A530 hard 
drive for an Amiga 500. There is an 
adaptor available for the KCS which 
enables the unit to fit into an A2000 
or A3000, but this is an optional 
extra. 

GOING DUTCH 

KCS got in first with the PowerBoard 
as the earliest PC emulation card for 
the Amiga 500. Its biggest 
advantage over the AT-Once is that 
installation couldn't be easier: open 
the RAM expansion slot in the base 
of the 500, plug in and the process 
is complete. 

Specifications claimed are 
impressive: 704Kb of memory in 
MDA/CGA, 640Kb in CGA/VGA, 
200Kb extra memory (MS-DOS RAM 
disk for example), 512K Fast RAM 
plus 512K RAM disk for normal 
Amiga use, a real time clock, an 
11MHz clock speed which can be 
slowed down if required, a software 
flicker fixer in PC interlace mode, a 
mouse driver compatible with the 
Amiga mouse plus a pause facility. 



AMIGA SHOPPER'S DEFINITIVE PC EMULATORS GUIDE 

EMULATOR NAME EMULATOR TYPE CPU TYPt CPU SPEED MORTON SI RUNS WINDOWS 2? RUNS WINDOWS 3? LANDMARK SPEED fPU SUPPORT USE AMIGA DRIVE USE AMIGA MEM? MEM ON WARD MDA 



Transformer 


Software 


- 


- 


0.3 


No (loo slow) 


Not at all 


- 


- 


Yes 


- 


- 


Yes 


IBeM Software 


Software 


- 


- 


0.3 


No (loo slow) 


Not at all 


- 


- 


Yes 


- 


- 


Yes 


PC-Task 


Software 


- 


- 


0.3 


No (loo slaw) 


Not at all 


- 


- 


Yes 


- 


- 


Yes 


Powerboard 


Hardware 


NEC V30 


10.4MHz 


4.6 


Yes (a bit slow) 


Very slowly 


3.5 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes|5l2K) 


Yes 


AT-Ome 


Hardware 


80286 


7.14Mrrz 


7.6 


Yes (a bit slow) 


Yes (slowly) 


8.7 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


AMkePliB 


Hardware 


80286 


16MHz 


17.2 


Yes 


Yes 


15.4 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


PC286 


Hardware 


80286 


16MHz 


17.2 


Yes 


Yes 


15.4 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes[5l2K) 


Yes 


AM 


Hardware 


8088 


4.77MHz 


0.8 


Yes (very slowly) 


No 


- 


Yes 


No 


No 


Yes(512X) 


Yes 


A2086 


mm 


80286 


8MHz 


6.6 


Yes(fosl) 


No 


9.4 


Yes 


No 


No 


Yes (1Mb) 


Yes 


Golden Gate 


Hardware 


80386a 


2SMHi 


23.3 


Yes 


Yes (muhilasking) 


28.4 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


512Kexp to 216Mb 


Yes 


H A AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 



















PC EMULATORS 



This is all available with MS-DOS/GW 
Basic/Shell/DOS help and PC 
function key emulation. 

All this sounds pretty impressive, 
but how well does it perform? Getting 
up and running was a doddle. A short 
boot routine selects the video mode, 
disk drives assigned and any 





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■■ 







Vortex AT-Once Plus: buying this 
one depends on whether you want 
to Invalidate your warranty and get 
into dismantling your A5O0. A pig to 
fit, and I suffered too many crashes. 
Perhaps it was me at fault, but 
unplugging CPUs and all that 
business is not for the faint-hearted 

peripherals attached, and then 
you're off. 

A point worth mentioning here is 
that the KCS does not work with the 
ISA bus in the 



A2000 or A3000, ' 

so additional PC 

cards are of no 

use for expanding 

your system. You 

can configure the 

KCS to use either 

the Amiga internal 

floppy or external 

floppy as a PC 

drive, internally as 

a 720K 3.5", or __^_^^__ 

externally as the 

same or as a 5.25". Unfortunately 

this configuration only works in PC 

mode; in Amiga mode a DOS transfer 

utility such as DOS-to-DOS is 



"Warranties are 

invalidated if the 

silver seals around 

your machine are 



required. The KCS really performs 
best when a hard drive is attached to 
your Amiga. A partition on your drive 
will allow PC data on one half and 
Amiga data on the other. 

In action the KCS proved 
faultless, handling Windows 
adequately if somewhat slowly. Text 
handling was 
excellent, speeds 
of screen refresh 
were a match for 
most 286 
machines I have 
used. It isn't until 
the real test of 
graphics-intense 
applications is 
pushed that the 
KCS starts to 
wobble. F29 
Retaliator for the 
PC really was a 
labour, and the 
utilisation of the 
NEC V-30 8/16-bit 
processor on the KCS, as opposed 
to the slower Intel 8086, still failed 
to achieve sufficient speed from the 
Amiga to make the flight-sim. 
smooth. Deluxe Paint II Enhanced for 
the PC was beautiful - using a 
multisync monitor gave a completely 
new perspective to tonal gradation. 
The difference in resolution alone is 
worth the money. 

KCS is a good piece of kit, 
superbly made and easy to use. Disk 
access is remarkably 
^™ fast. A nice inclusion 
is the help screen 
which enables 
configuration changes 
to be carried out at 
any time. I've only two 
criticisms really - 
firstly the graphics 
update gets rapidly 
slower proportional to 
processing; secondly, 
a minor but irritating 
point: if you require an 
on/off switch, you have to set about 
the board with a soldering iron, some 
cable, and a switch of your own 
choosing. 



// 



A GERMAN LADA 

Like the KCS, the AT-Once is 

designed specifically for the Amiga 

500, but installation is a completely 

different ball-game. If your A500 is 

still under warranty, you have a 

problem. Those 

among you faint of 

heart at the 

thought of 

removing the 

screws from your 

Amiga and 

dismantling it, 

take note, 

because fitting 

the AT-Once is a 

swine! Warranties 

are invalidated if 

the silver seals 

around your machine are broken, and 

this is just what you must do to fit it. 

Off comes the lid, off comes the 

metal shielding, out comes the 

keyboard, out comes the Gary chip, 

out comes the 68000 processor... 

Getting worried? There's more! My 

advice before you start is to look at 

the 'Read-Me' file on the support 

disk, which gives further instructions 



beyond the small but reasonably 
concise instruction manual. Fitting of 
the AT-Once is basically a reversal of 
this procedure, but some A500s 
require the installation of the 
enclosed Gary module in order to 
make everything fit. Unfortunately 





No, I know what you are thinking, but 
just to be a smart-ass, this is DPalnt 
II Enhanced on the PC, using the old 
XT bridgeboard. You think grabbing 
brushes in HAM with DPalnt IV Is 
slow? You want to try the XT, It just 
takes ages, but at least it does get 
there eventually... 



My own trusty old Commodore 
A2088. It may be laboriously slow, 
long in the tooth, and ancient 
technology, but it never falls, works 
with everything I throw at it, and 
has worked constantly without fault 
for several years 

this module can cause some A590s 
to cease working, so be warned. 
More importantly, if you have an 
older machine, check out 
the revision number on the 
main motherboard. Revision 
6a is what you don't want to 
find, because the AT-Once 
will not work with that 
version unless you carry out 
a motherboard modification 
requiring the soldering of a 
wire across resistor 106 
(labelled on the board as 
R106). 

Well, the board is 
installed, and it looks really 
neat and compact. Unlike 
the KCS which is 8-bit, the 
AT-Once sports an Intel 
80286 16-bit processor running at 
either 8 or 16MHz. The choice is up 
to you. 

The two versions are known as 
the AT-Once Classic, 7.2MHz with a 
Norton rating of 7.6, or the AT-Once 

continued on poge 29 



AMIGA 



PC EMULATORS GUIDE 



Here 



CGA 



EGA 



VGA Olivetti Multitosks? HD Support? ISA Bos support? Ports supported lnslolloticn/lODocurnenrnlion/10 Compotob/lO For which Amiga? Price Overol/50 



Ho 


No 


No 


No 


Ho 


No 


Ho 


- 


im,co«i 


- 


5 


ASM 


PD 


10 


Ho 


Yes 


Ho 


No 


Ho 


Yes 


Ho 


- 


LPTI:,C0M1 


- 


6 6 


A500, A2000 


PD 


14 


Ho 


Yes 


Ho 


No 


Ho 


Yes 


Yes port or file 


- 


LPTI,C0Ml+2 


- 


9 8 


All 


£40 


18 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Ho 


Yes port or file 


Ho 


im,C0Ml+2 


9 


5 10 


All except 1 000 


(189 


35 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes port or file 


Ho 


lPTl,C0Ml+2 


3 


6 6 


A500. A2000 


£139 


25 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes port or file 


Ho 


LPTI,C0Ml+2 


4 


7 7 


A5O0.A2OOO 


£240 


30 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes port or file 


Ho 


LPTi,(0Ml+2 


8 


8 8 


A500wfmGVP 


£229.95 


38 


No 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Port, file oi Heard 


Yes, XT (8-b"rt) 


IPTi 


8 


9 9 


AZOOO, A3000 


t£150 


26 


No 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Port, file or Heard 


Yes, AT(16-hit) 


im 


7 


9 9 


A2000, A3000 


l£350 


38 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


IDE on eard, Amiga, ISA Card 




lPTH2,C0MI+2 





8 9 


A2000, A3000 


£499 


46 






















AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 <) 1 



GASTEINER 



(.(XDCnIMAGE 




ICD power 




Unit 3 

Millmead Business Centre 

Millmead Road 

London NI7 9QU 

Tel: 081 365 1151 

Fax: 081 885 1953 




Amiga 

Shopper best 

buy 



256 Greyscale Scanners 

Total solution for scanning A4 images 

Features :- True greyscales , 100-400 dpi , 105mm head , OCR option 

Top quality hardware with the latest version of software from Migraph. Allows real time scanning, provides powerful editing/ 
painting features. Compatible (imports*xports) IFF,IMG,PCX,TFF and MACPAINT formats.Compatible with all Amiga's 
A500,A500+,A600,A1500,A2000,A2500 and A3000 

Touch UP , Merge It and Special 
Touch UP and Merge It Software OCR software 



Full OCR Version 
Software Available 

£165.00 



£119.95 



Minmum system requirement 2Mb RAM, and a Hard 
Disk 



£199.00 



Trackballs 




Stylish three button trackballs, 
with third button supporting 
auto fire and drag and hold 



GOLD 

AWARD 
WINNER 

IN ST 
FORMAT 

92% 



ST 

REVIEW 

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With two colour 
shining Crystal Ball 



£34.95 



Auto Mouse/ 
Jostick Switch 




St Format 78% 

Automatic Switcher 

between two input devices 

with a click of a button. 

E.g. mouse/mouse, 

mouse/joystick, joystick/ 

joystick. 



£12.95 



Optical Mouse 



Optical Pen 
Mouse 




St Format 81% 
( u Amiga 79% 
Superb 300dpi Optical 
Mouse with effortless micro 
switch buttons. Fast, smooth 
and reliable. 

Includes Optical Mouse Pad 
and Holder 



£26.00 



A stylish Pen Mouse with 
quality construction and 
smooth fast movement 
Micro switch buttons. Ideal 
for DTRartwork,etc 

Includes Optical Pad 



£35.95 



1Mb RAM with Clock A6O0 

1Mb RAM without dock A600 

512k RAM with clock A 500 

lMbRAMfbrASOO* 

Kickmrt Switch 

Boottckckr Switch 

Power S W ly tor A 500 

15" External Drive 

IMbSimmi 

2-8 Mb RAM for A20O0 A 1500 

Power Scanner 



Mega Mouse 



GOLD 

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WINNER 

IN AMIGA 

FORMAT 

90% 



A 290 dpi high resolution Opto-Mechanical Mouse. 

Top quality construction ensures rapid and smooth 

movement, with micro switch buttons. 




Mouse only 



£10.95 



Mouse with hard mat 
and mouse holder 



£14.95 



Cordless 
Infrared Mouse 




G tmnlMAfcE 

The Brush Mouse with 



C u Amiga 81% 
Remote control mouse, 
long working distance. 
Lone lite rechargeable 
battery. 260 dpi. 

includes Hard Mouse Mat 



£45.00 



£49.00 


Hard Dnv 


£4100 
£2SO0 


■ ■ •-* ■ %» ns ft ■ T 

A5007A500+ 


£39.00 


52 Mb RAM Upgradeable 


£14.95 


105 Mb RAM Upgradeable 


£ 9.95 


210 Mb RAM Upgradeable 


£14.95 
£49.00 


A1500/A2000 


£25.00 


52 Mb RAM Upgradeable 


£129.00 


105 Mb RAM Upgradeable 


£95.00 


210 Mb RAM Upgradeable 



£329.00 
£399.00 
£519.00 

£299.00 
£379.00 
£499.00 




Goldenlmage Mouse 
with Mat 

£ 13.95 



D-Paint. 
£ 19.95 



St Format 

88% 



GOLD 

AWARD 

WINNER 

IN AMIGA 

FORMAT 

90% 



ICD Products 

AdRAM-208(K2 Mb RAM) £139.00 

AdRAM-54(K4 Mb RAM) £209.00 

AdSCSI 2000 w/LPS105S £405.00 

AdSpeed £129.00 

AdSpeed/lDE-40 £229.00 

Flicker Free Preference £ 19.00 

Flicker Free Video 2 £195.00 

KkkBack ROM Switcher £ 19.00 

Novia 60 i £359.00 

Novia 85i £449.00 

Novia/AdSpeed 60i £499.00 

Novia/AdSpeed 85i £599.00 

Prima 105i £429.00 

Prima 120i £445.00 

Prima/AdSpeed 105i £579.00 

Prima.AdSpeed I20i £599.00 



Please add £330 postage and packing to all orders under £100.00 and Orders over £100.00 add £5.00 postage and packing. COURIER CHARGE £10.00. All prices inckide VAT. 

Caiiarwt accepts. rxuaruriLi by Vita, Access, Cheque at postal, otdr*. 

E.&.O.E. Rices, subject to change Without notice Goods. Subject to opJownhlHij. Spectfbatiori subject to change Without notice. 



PC EMULATORS 



continued from page 27 

Plus 16MHz with a Norton rating of 
17.2. Principal differences apart 
from the clock speed are that the 
'Plus' has 512K on-board memory 




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So, how about a little desktop 
publishing with a Commodore AT 
2086 card? No difficulty 
encountered, but it really is making 
the old 286 processor heat up 
trying to move graphics around at 
this rate of knots 

configurable as PC or Amiga Fast 
RAM and that it has a slot to fit an 
optional 80287 maths co-processor. 
The classic has neither of these. 

So how did it perform? Erratically 
is the only reply: it crashed too often, 
and while being reasonably fast, I 
wouldn't like to be in the middle of 
an important document only to find 
work lost. 

I ran a module player as a 
background task, it crashed. I 
started a ray-tracing program as a 
background task, it crashed. I went 
back and checked the CPU 
installation to ensure the 68000 was 
properly seated - it was. I put it back 
together, it worked, for 10 minutes 
and then it crashed again. I got fed 
up here, speed tested it again, and 
decided to remove it altogether. 

ON AND ON AND ON 

Commodore makes good kit as we 
all know, and the A2088 PC 
Bridgeboard is a superbly engineered 
and extremely reliable emulator for 
the A2000 and A3000. The package 
comes complete with a 5.25" drive 
to be mounted in the front bay of the 
computer. A second drive port is 
located on the rear of the card 
suitable for a 5.25" 360K or a 3.5" 
second drive. The card uses an Intel 
8088 processor running at 4.77MHz, 
although most users of the XT board 
know that the best way to improve 
performance is to chuck the Intel 
chip away and replace it with an NEC 
V20, costing about £15 and giving 
noticeably better performance. As 
with its bigger brother, the XT is fully 
multitasking with the Amiga. There is 



space on the board to fit a maths co- 
processor, giving much improved 
performance on number crunching 
activities, and the support for the ISA 
bus enables users to add additional 
cards such as VGA graphics and 
extended memory 
La cards to extend the 
capabilities beyond 
the CGA and 512K 
limitations. An on- 
board hard disk 
interface allows 
users to attach a 
hard disk directly to 
the XT board. There 
is no support for the 
Amiga's own disk 
drives, and whilst 
the parallel port is 
supported, the serial 
port is not. You can 
however partition the 
Amiga's hard drive 
and share space 
with the Amiga. Unfortunately the 
card does not share the Amiga's 
memory, so larger software packages 
need additional memory to enable 




really is snail-paced. Text is still 
reasonably acceptable, but graphic 
applications rapidly grind to a halt as 
the Amiga tries to cope with the aged 
performance of the old processor. 
Even using my accelerator at 30MHz, 
it's tedious. Running Microsoft 
Windows is almost like ray-tracing, 
and hard disk activity is almost cup 
of coffee time. 

286 FOR PRICE OF A 386 

As well as the XT Bridgeboard for the 
A2000 and A3000, Commodore also 
produces the PC/AT 80286 
Bridgeboard for the same machines. 
This differs from the former in 
several respects, principally cost, in 
that the card is ludicrously over- 
priced. 

Commodore has a 386sx card in 
beta version, with which it intends to 
replace both the XT and the AT, but 
despite promising me a look, this 
didn't materialise. So knowing 
Commodore as I do, sorry Kelly, but 
this is currently your flagship 
emulator, and considering a punter 
can buy a complete stand-alone 386 




For those with GVP drives, there Is really only one solution - the PC 286. AT 
performance, ease of fitting, and well behaved in trial. Highly recommended! 



them to run. and there is no space 
available on the board to extend this. 
The mouse is supported, as Is 
sound, but this requires a connector, 
two short wires and a speaker to 
make it function - a task fairly easy 
to achieve. 

I have owned an XT card for 
several years, using a VGA card and 
an extra memory card. I have never 
found any PC software that doesn't 
work. Seems like the ideal solution, 
especially as the 

whole lot can now ■■■■■■■ 
be picked up for 
around £200. 

So what's the 
snag? Dead 
simply, speed. The 
XT Bridgeboard is 
very reliable, 
beautifully made, 
but pathetically 
slow. Norton 
System Info gives 
0.8. That means it 
works at 0.8 times 
the speed of a bog 
standard IBM XT, 
and believe me 
that is slow] Perhaps it was 
acceptable years ago when 
Commodore first started to 
manufacture the board, but now it 



"...graphics 
applications grind 

to a halt as the 
Amiga tries to cope 

with the aged 
performance of the 

old processor." 



including 100Mb hard drive, VGA 
monitor, DOS 5 and Windows 3.1 for 
around £750, I can only say that at 
£575 this board is a joke. The truth 
is, however, that dealers or 
wholesalers are making a killing, 
because Commodore sells the board 
at considerably less than this!! 

What does all this money buy 
you? Well firstly the processor is an 
Intel 80286 running at 8MHz. (Again 
this is best changed, this time for 

the NEC V30, to give 
■■■■■■■■■■ improved 

performance.) There 
is an empty space to 
add the optional 
maths co-processor, 
and a 5.25" 1.2Mb 
floppy is included in 
the package. Support 
for the ISA bus, 
Amiga mouse, parallel 
port, internal hard 
drive and so on is the 
same as for the XT 
board. The principal 
differences are that 
there is no external 
drive connector to the 
rear of the card, and that on-board 
memory is extended to 640K. The 
board works well, and shows a 
distinct improvement over the XT. 



Text handling is very fast indeed - it 
takes quite a burst of graphics 
activity before the inevitable 
bottleneck of calculations starts to 
jam things up. 

Fitting of the AT card is Identical 
to that for the XT. It requires 
removing the lid from the machine. 
The blanking plate to the rear of 
one of the Zorro slots is removed, 
and the card is simply pushed into 
place, bridging with the ISA bus to 
provide the extended options. The 
blanking plate for the 5.25" drive is 
removed from the front of the 
computer case. The drive is then 
bolted into place using the spacers 
and bolts provided. The 3-pin 
connector on the computer wiring 
harness is plugged into the drive, the 
ribbon cable from the drive 
connected to the card, lid replaced, 
and once switched on, installation of 
the PC emulation software can begin. 
The 'Janus' installation package is 
very easy to use, and offers all the 
usual facilities for system 
configuration. 

Manuals for both the XT and AT 
card are excellent, and very user- 
friendly. It's a great shame that 
Commodore didn't offer these two 
pieces of kit at affordable prices 
when they were first released, firstly 
because they are excellent in both 
design and reliability, but more 
importantly, it would have 
encouraged more people to buy 
2000s, more people to buy 
Bridgeboards, and encouraged 
Commodore to get a better 
replacement on to the market-place, 
avoiding the drift of Amiga users who 
are changing to PCs. 

PLUG IN, PLUG IN 

Lining up nicely with our collection of 
emulators is a somewhat unique 
offering for those of you out there 
who own the much acclaimed GVP 
HD8+ or the A530 Amiga 500 hard 
drives. 

Both of these drives, which plug 
into the edge connector of the A500, 
share a 'Mini slot' internally, which 
will enable you to expand the system 
without having to extend the 'pass 
through' limitation. 

The other advantageous and 
obvious feature is that there is no 
invalidation of your computer's 
warranty. The PC286 runs at a crisp 
16MHz, and has on-board space to 
fit a 287 co-processor. 

On-board there is 512K of PC 
RAM plus the use of Amiga RAM to 
extend memory. Hercules, CGA and 
Toshiba T3100 video modes are 
supported, but unfortunately EGA and 
VGA are only accessible in 
monochrome. All of the Amiga's 
facilities can be called on for use - 
all ports, drives and interfaces - and 
the card allows full multi-tasking with 
the Amiga. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



PC EMULATORS 




The Golden Gate: this really Is a 
beautiful piece of kit. It went 
straight into my A2000 and worked 
like a dream. Construction of the 
multi-layered board is of the highest 
order. The software is easy to follow, 
and the documentation OK. It's 
rather expensive, and the basic lump 
really Is inadequate without the 
additional 'extras' which I think 
should be included in the price 

VORSPRUNG DURCH 
TECHNIK 

There are PC cards, emulators, 
software, and there is the Golden 
Gate... 

New from Vortex, the makers of 
the 'not so hot' AT-Once, is Golden 
Gate - a completely different 
animal, because Golden Gate is a 
beast! 



Looking at the 
card itself, it is a 
full width PC size 
card, 6-layer 
sandwich, with 
the initial 
appearance of 
having been 
manufactured to 
an extremely high 
level of 
competence. 
Before talking 
about 

performance, let's just list the 

impressive specs. 

The Golden Gate is a 25MHz 

80386sx CPU card which fits into the 

A2000 or A3000. 

The card bridges the ISA and 

Zorro slots allowing extension of the 



"The Golden Gate is 
a beast!" 



supported 6 colour CGA and 
Hercules, Olivetti, Toshiba and 
EGA/VGA monochrome into full 
blown colour VGA. (Additional PC 
cards can obviously be added to 
enable the use of LAN controllers, 
SCSI host adaptors, you name it.) 



JARGON BUSTING * JARGON BUSTING 



MDA - Monochrome Display Adaptor displays monochrome text only. 

Norton Rating - A method of comparing relative speeds of different PCs. The 
old PC XT is rated at 1; speeds of others are given as multiples. 

Hercules - This is a graphics adapter which is very similar to MDA, with the 
small difference that it can support graphics. 

CGA - Stands for Colour Graphics Adapter. This type of adapter enables a 
PC to display in colour, with up to 16 colours of text, or up to 4 colours 
in graphics with a resolution of 320x200 or 2 colours with a resolution 
of 640x200. 

EGA - Enhanced graphics adapter. This graphics adapter allows much 
greater graphics power than a CGA card, supporting up to 16 colours 
with a resolution of 640x350. 

VGA - Video graphics array. This is the most popular of the graphics 

adapters in the PC world, currently the flagship of PC graphics. It allows 
more memory to be fitted to the card (Super VGA) to enable a maximum 
display of 256 colours out of a palette of 256,000 with a resolution of 
1024x768. This might all seem very nice, but any software emulation of 
this adapter on an Amiga would have to have its wings clipped. The 
Amiga can only display 16 colours at its highest resolution (640x512). 
Normal VGA allows a maximum resolution of 640x480, so this is all the 
software emulations will support. 

XT - This type of computer is an old design of PC which employs the 
following processors - Intel 8088, NEC V20. Although 16 
bits internally, these particular processors can only talk to the outside 
world in 8 bits, unlike the Amiga's 16 bits. This means that memory 
access and video processing can be very slow. Also the clock speed of 
these processors are low (under 10MHz). 



Flicker fixing cards are supported, as 
are '020, '030, and '040 acceler- 
ators. There is an integrated 386sx 
chip set and an AT compatible BIOS 
with enhanced 386 functions. The 
Amiga mouse is emulated as a serial 
Microsoft mouse, and the Amiga 
keyboard works as a PC keyboard. 
There is also a built-in speaker, real 
time clock, and CMOS RAM. 

512K of on-board RAM can be 
extended with 32-bit SIMM sockets 
in 256K, 1Mb or 4Mb lumps up to 
16Mb. 4Mb of this RAM can be 
configured as an auto-configuring 
Fast RAM expansion under 
AmigaDOS. 




The Golden Gate showing superb form 
with Windows. It's as fast as the PC I 
use, and shows no problems at all 
with disk handling. If you have the 
dosh, this package really is a beauty. 
Pity some of the necessary 
equipment, such as the disk 
controller chip, comes as an extra 

The rear of the card hosts two 
ports, an external floppy adapter 
capable of reading high density 
1.2Mb, 1.44Mb and 2.88Mb disks, 
along with an optional connector for 
future developments. 
All memory above l^mmmmmmmmm 
1Mb can be used as 
extended or 
expanded memory. 
Individual 

assignment of MS- 
DOS partitions can 
be achieved either 
as a file within an 
AmigaDOS partition, 
or with a complete 
partition as an MS- 
DOS partition. Up to - 
24 MS-DOS partitions can be 
installed. MS-DOS can be booted 
directly from any one of these. All 
versions of MS-DOS from 3.2 
upwards work successfully, as well 
as DR-DOS 5.0 and 6.0. 

All adds up to a pretty extensive 
collection of specs, but what does 
the translation into practice 
produce? 

Fitting the board was relatively 



"Correct antistatic 

procedures are 

essential, as is a 

sense of 

adventure, 



difficult. Among the kit supplied with 
Golden Gate is a CPU adapter. 

This has to be plugged into the 
68000 socket on the motherboard, 
then the 68000 plugged into the 
adapter. This is a fiddly process 
which involves removing the metal 
supporting frame taking up the power 
supply and internal floppies. Correct 
antistatic precautions are essential, 
as is a spirit of adventure for those 
among us not too happy about 
levering expensive microprocessors 
out of their sockets. After you've 
removed an appropriate blanking 
plate on the rear of the computer, 
the Golden Gate then simply plugs 
into one of the 
Zorro slots, in 
similar fashion to 
the Commodore 
XT and AT cards. 
I must however 
be getting close 
to the power 
supply starting to 
groan - A2000 
users like 
myself, who 
slowly fill up the 
various slots, 
need to take 
heed. Apart from 
the obvious 
power 

consumption, the 
three hard 
drives, accelerator card, 
motherboard and other assorted 
goodies all contribute to an alarming 
amount of heat - fitting an additional 
cooling fan would be a wise 
precaution. That aside, the software 
set-up routines worked smoothly 
from the 'GOLDMINE' disk set 
provided... and off we went. 

Initially I connected the Golden 
Gate to the ancient Amstrad ST506 
8-bit hard drive I normally use with 
my XT card. Splendid! the old devil 

burst into life, and 
mt ^ mmmmmm mmm within seconds, 
there was 
PowerMenu. 
Onwards, and into 
Windows. The 
performance of 
this card is 
faultless. It was 
working in VGA 
through my 
Compaq VGC VGA 
card without 
_______ batting an eyelid - 

data processing from the hard disk 
was vastly improved. 

Impetuosity got the better of me 
now, so off I shot to my local dealer, 
Microtec, and after a little sweet-talk 
managed to swiftly return to my 
A2000 complete with a scrounged 
IDE 40Mb hard disk. Fortunately the 
hard-disk was ready loaded with 

continued on page 32 



// 



30 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



:AMERICASLARGES 

SUPPLIER OF 
AMIGA CUSTOM 
CHIPS + UPGRADES 



8372A 1 Meg Agnus inc. puller .£31.30 

8375 (PAL) 2 Meg Agnus £39.50 

1.3 Kickstan ROM ..... ___ .£19.70 

A500 UK Keyboard-factory new £35.60 

5719 Gary £10.44 






8362 Dcni.sc.- bright.. 



.,£13.90 



6570-036 keyboard conlrol chip £8.75 

A500 original P/S. 220 volls (no plug) £40.25 

A2000 original P/S, 220 volls _.£60.00 

A300 220 voll power supply £90.00 

A501 original new 5I2K module £18.90 

A500 inlcmal floppy drive £46.00 

x 4/S0 Sialic Column Zip £15.60 Panasonic 32k primer buffer chip .... £9.00 

8520A CIA (2MHj) Great price £6.35 Citizen 32k printer buffer chip. _ £12.40 

A500 PC Motherboard-PAL, populated & tested -(new low price) Rev. 3 £58.60 

A2000 PC Motherboard - PAL. populated & tested - includes the 1-3 ROM. 8327A I Meg Agnus & Super 
Dcnisc 8373 installed , ,......£255.60 

• A 20(H) Computer PAL with 1 .3. 8372A Agnus & keyboard. Reconditioned by Commodore. 
90 day warranty - limited quantity .. 



...£350.00 

• Advanced Amiga Analyser: Sophisticated but easy to use. Checks status of all data transmissions/signals, 

disk drive, ports, buffer chips, alignment, joystick + mouse. Checks status of read/write errors and [ells 
what chips arc bad. (hardware and software) A must for every Amiga service centre £49.80 

• Microeard 600: A600 credit card size memory (PCMCIA) for A60O, fantastic price, 

2 Meg /4 Meg card _ _ £94.00/£125.O0 

• The Final Test: Diagnostic diskette tests keyboard, display, graphics. Workbench. 

sound, timing, realtime clock, RAM, etc. ( 1 2 diagnostic programs in all) £6.95 

• MegaChip 2000 by DKB: Upgrade your A500/A 1 500/A200O to 2Mb 

of chip RAM. Includes 2 meg Agnus, chip puller & "Final Test" 
diagnostic diskette (no soldering), ... 



Buy the MegaChip from us and we'll give you the new Super Denise for........ 



£170.00 

£17.00 



Switehllt by Global Upgrades Inc. Electronic ROM selector switch for 1.3 or 2.0. Makes all your software 
compatible. Keyboard or mouse controlled. Does not overlap the 68000 - allows for accelerator 
(2.0 compatible) very popular in the U.S. (includes dual-lone speaker for confirmation) £19.50 



UPGRADE YOUR ASOO TO THE A500 PLUS - 8373 SUPER DENISE - £21.25 
*2.04 Upgrade ROM only (PAL): No manual or diskettes. Ideal for multi-computer 

owners, schools, businesses, etc £22.00 



AdRAM 540 for A500 by ICD: Add up to 4 megs of RAM with battery backup 

internally in your ASOO. 1 Mcg/2 Megs (install up to 4 megs) 

AdSpeed by ICD: Best accelerator in its price range... 



Flicker Free Video by ICD: Eliminates interlace nicker (new version).. 
-»- DO NOT FEAR! -*- 



„£74.207£95.15 

£94.50 

£132.50 



Buying direcdy from the U.S with your credit card offers you the same protection as it does in the U.K. with the 
added benefit of saving lots of money. Deal directly with North America's largest distributor of custom 
Commodore & Amiga pans and chips. The Grapevine Group has been successfully servicing the U.K. and the 
Continent for 13 years. All our pans and chips arc new and guaranteed for 90 days. 

DEALERS - SEND YOUR LETTERHEAD FOR SPECIAL PRION 



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REDK Kl) 



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3 Cheslnut Street, SufTern, New York 10901 U-S.A.^ 
■■■ International Fax: 0101-914-357-6243 
in Customer Order Line: 0101-914-357 2424 
Telephone Hours: 1pm 10 11pm Mon-Fri British time f f ^» 
Prices subject to change Internation al Orders: If your order is over £40 send or fax front of 
credit card. Air Parcel <:iiarufs: All chip.. - £5.36 Keyboard & PCBoard - £8.4(1 






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Quarterback Tools 44.99 * 

Turbo Print Pro 2.0 39.99 



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AnitA 19.99 

Art Department Pro 2. ...139.99 

Baby 9.99 

Big Alternative Scroller ...34.99 

Broadcast Titler 2 154.99 

Deluxe Paint IV Rev 4.1 .54.99 

Expert Draw 44.99 

Expert 4D Jr 34.99 

Font Grabber 29.99 

Hotlinks 49.99 

Imagine 2.0 189.99 

Personal Finance 

Manager 19.99 

Personal Font Maker 34.99 

Professional Calc 99.99 

Pro Draw 3.0 - NEW! 89.99 

Real 3D Beginners 99.99 

Scala 179.99 

Scala500 64.99 

Take2 34.99 

Video Director 99.99 

Vidi Amiga 12 84.99 

Video Fonts 39.99 

Vista Pro 2 49.99 

XCAD 2000 - NEW! 99.99 

XCAD 3000 - NEW! 299.99 

Educational 

Better Maths 14.99 

Better Spelling 14.99 

Compendium 6 24.99 

Distant Suns 4.1 39.99 

Fun School 4 Series 15.99 

GB Route Plus 54.99 

Junior Typist 11.99 

Maths Mania 14.99 

Micro Series 16.99 

Tekno Amiga 64.99 

Three Bears 14.99 

Voyager 1 .1 69.99 

* Development & Utilities 

AMOS 29.99 

* AMOS 3D 22.99 

AMOS Compiler 19.99 

J-. Easy AMOS 22.99 

"*" Anim Fonts 1 , 2 & 3 29.99 

Blitz Basic 39.99 

* Can Do V1.6 64.99 

Cross Dos 5.0 26.99 

Dev Pac 3.0 49.99 

* Directory Opus 25.99 

Diskmaster 32.99 

* HiSpeed Pascal 64.99 

Home Accounts 2 36.99 

Maxiplan 4.0 34.99 

* Quarterback 5.0 39.99 



Hardware 

Boot Selector Switch 14.99 

51 2K RAM with clock 29.99 

Colourburst 349.99 

1.5Mb RAM with clock ....82.99 

Invision Plus/Live 499.99 

Flicker Free Video 

A500 269.99 

Kickstart Switch with 1 .3 

ROM 39.99 

Naksha Mouse 22.99 

Optical Mouse 29.99 

RocGen Genlock 84.99 

RocGen Plus 129.99 

RocLite Drive 54.99 

Roc Key 269.99 

Podscat Graphics 

Tablet 189.99 

Sharp JX1 00 Scanner 

with Amiga interface 459.99 

Touch Screen 

for Amiga 229.99 

3 Button Track Ball 34.99 

Zydec Trackball 29.99 

Zydec Amiga Drive 49.99 

Zydec A500 

1Mb RAM Card 44.99 

Zydec Hand Scanner ....119.99 

Music & Sound 



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Audio Engineer Plus 2. .149.99* 

Audition 4 34.99 

Deluxe Music Const. ^ 

Set 49.99 * 

Megamix Master 29.99 

Perfect Sound 39.99 * 

Pro Midi Interface 19.99 

Stereo Master 29.99 

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DTP & Wordprocessing 



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Gold Disk Type 29.99 . 

Kindwords 3.0 34.99 * 

Mini Office - NEW I ! I 39.95 

Page Setter 2 34.99 * 

Page Stream 2.2 129.99 

Pen Pal 49.99 

Protext V5.5 99.99 * 

Professional Page 3.0 ..129.99 

Quickwrite 29.99^ 

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Wordworth 1 .1 79.99 * 



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NORTON RATING 

ACOMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF EMULATOR PERFORMANCE 

USING NORTON BENCHMARK CRITERIA 



A graphical representation of the 
comparative speeds of the 
emulators I have looked at in this 
article. You really do appreciate 
the difference between the 
software emulators and the 
combination kits 

continued from page 30 

software, so off with the lid to find a 
suitable space amongst the chaos, 
connect up to Golden Gate interface, 
back together - Wow! The speed is 
phenomenal. Disk access and 
processing makes the 386 I use at 
work look positively tame. Everything 
works without the slightest hitch. 

Norton Utilities sees a 
comparative performance: 
Benchmark 23.5, approximately 24 
times faster than my XT card, even 



rivalling the speed 
of my Amiga using 
the GVP '030 card. 
Word for Windows 
positively flies, and 
F29 Retaliator is as 
smooth and crisp 
as anything I've 
seen short of a 
486. 

I have yet to find 
anything that will 
not work with 
Golden Gate. If you 
want the Rolls 
Royce of cards that 
performs like a 
Ferrari, this is 
without doubt the 

one! I wonder if Silica will notice if I 

don't send it back? 

SUMMARY 

Which emulator is most appropriate 
for you is really dependent on several 
factors. You should ask yourself the 
following questions... 

• Do I have an A500, or an 
A2000/A3000? 

• Do I own a GVP HD8+ or an 
A530? 

• Do I want text only, or text plus 
graphics? 

• How much cash do I have? 

A500 owners who do not have a GVP 
drive, and only want text handling, 
need look no further than PCTask; it 
is multitasking, cheap, and 
adequate, although a little slow. 



Second choice, Transformer. 

For A500 owners who don't have 
a GVP hard drive, don't want to start 
taking their Amiga to bits, need text 
and graphics, the KCS is the simple 
answer -just plug into the trapdoor 
slot and go. Text handling is fine, 
graphics a touch slow. AT-Once 
would be my final choice, but a lot of 
hassle, and for me, unstable. 

A500 owners who do have the 
appropriate GVP drive, then 
unquestionably the GVP (Vortex) 
PC286 is the best option. It's stable, 
fast and quickly installed. The PC286 
is also reduced in price to £199 
making it an even more attractive. 

For A2000/A3000 owners who 
require text only and whose funds 
are limited, PCTask is the one. If 
graphics are also needed, check out 
discounts on the Commodore AT 
2086 bridgeboard. Prices will fall 
rapidly when Commodore announces 
the price and specs of its new 386 
cards - the AT is a reliable and well 
made performer, and no slouch. The 
XT card is a possibility. Now as 
prices on this discontinued unit drop 



to as little as £150 it is worth 
considering, but it is really slow, so 
be warned. The KCS will slot into 
both high-end Amigas, but it needs 
an adaptor board which isn't cheap - 
and remember the KCS does not 
support the ISA bus. 

Golden Gate is a superb 
performer, beautifully made and very 
fast, although not exactly cheap. But, 



"Golden Gate is the 

Rolls Royce of the 

cards and performs 



like a Ferrari 



H 



386 is now accepted as the entry 
level in the PC world, so there will be 
continued hardware and software 
support, and manufacturers are 
producing packages that exploit this 
level of technology to the full. 
These are my findings, the 
choice is yours, f fl--! 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

My grateful thanks are due to the following who made time and 

equipment available for my use: 

David Bell at Microtec of Morpeth, Vortex in Germany, Bitcom Devices of 

Gateshead, 17-bit Software of Wakefield and Red Dragon Shareware of 

Rhyl. 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



AT - This is the second generation of PC computers 
which employ faster processors and even address 
memory in 16 or 32 bits. The processors involved 
are the 80286, '386 and '486. These can be 
clocked at anything up to 66MHz and can be up to 
70 times faster than a slow XT. 

ISA Bus - (Industry Standard Architecture) This is the 
place in a PC into which all the expansion cards are 
plugged. It is rather similar to the Zorro slots on an 
A2000 or A3000. If you've ever opened up an Amiga 
2000. you will see on the top left-hand area of the 
motherboard that there are a few extra expansion 
sockets. This is an ISA bus. An XT PC, using the ISA 
bus, will communicate with expansion cards in 8 bits 
per data movement, where an AT will communicate 
in 16 bits. Occasionally, '486 PCs will have EISA 
buses (Extended Industry Standard Architecture). 
This allows the processor to communicate with 
expansion cards in 32 bits per data movement. 

BIOS - A BIOS in a PC is, in effect, the ROM. It controls 
the way in which the PC operates. You may also find 
BIOSs on expansion cards on the ISA bus. A VGA 
card, for instance will have a BIOS, controlling the 
way that it operates. 

Shadowing - This procedure copies all the information of 
the PC BIOSs to Fast PC memory, either on the PC 



itself or on expansion cards, to enable lightning fast 
operation. For instance, if you shadow the BIOS on a 
VGA card, the screen update improves dramatically. 
This only applies to hardware emulators. 

LPT1 - This is the parallel interface of a PC. The Amiga 
equivalent is PRT:. The number afterwards is the 
number of the interface if your PC has more than 
one. 

COM1 - This is the serial interface of your PC. with the 
AmigaDOS equivalent being SER:. Once again, the 
number afterwards is the number of the interface if 
your PC has more than one. 

FPU - Floating Point Unit. This is another name for the 
maths co-processor that does all the number 
crunching activities on your computer. 

Expanded memory - When PCs were first thought of, 
they were limited to being able to address 640K of 
memory. Expanded memory provided a way round 
this, but due to the versatility of extended memory, 
expanded is not as popular as extended. 

Extended memory - This is memory above 640K on 
80286 processors and above. It is used by more 
applications than expanded memory is. This type of 
memory is usually faster than extended. 



ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 

Transformer PD 

IBeM PD 



PCTask. 



..licenseware 



KCS Powerboard £189.95 

Bitcom » 091 4901919 

KCS 2/3000 adaptor .£74.95 

Bitcom« 0914901919 

AT-Once Classk £139 

Silica systems ■=• 081 309 1111 

AT-Onte + £248 



First Choice -a 0532 637988 



,...£229.95 



GVP PC286 

MJC Supplies « 0462481166 

A2088 £varies 

Expect >£1 50 Widely available 

A2086 £varies 

Expect > £300 Widely available 

Golden Gate £499 

Silica Systems « 081 309 1 1 



Floppy Controller 

Silica Systems 
•=0813091111 



.£39.95 




32 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 





HE FINAL WORD 

...in Word Processing with Perfect Printing 



rom the makers of Pen Pal comes a 
brand new, unique WYSIWYG Word 
Processing package, that's simply the 
only choice for those who demand the 
I most from their Amiga. 

Final Copy n is not only the Amiga's most powerful 
Word Processor with every feature you'd expect 
- plus many more found normally in DTP packages - 
but also the only Word Processor that gives superb 
scaleable outline fonts from any Amiga - even 1.3's. 
Imagine outputting to your printers highest resolution, 
with almost Postscript™ laser perfection - no matter 
which printer you may have. Even with a simple 
nine pin dot matrix you'll get perfect 
printing* from Final Copy's 
20 smooth outline typefaces 
that are included! 



^Aoied Fbul C ^ 






Wall its ponvrjut new fames, there's no better Word Processor/PnbUsher 

for your Amiga. You'll quickly realise the benefits which were once the exclusive 

present of the Macintosh" 1 and other high end publishing systems 



" printer with normal Word Processor 



With multiple newspaper 
style columns and integrated 
drawing tools - for boxes, borders, 
** squares, lines at any angle, ovals, circles, 
arrows etc., plus colour text, along with many 
other formatting tools - your documents will look 
and read just as you want them to. 
Final Copy II includes a 110,000 woid British- 
English Collins Proximity Spelling Detector & 
Corrector, to help typing errors become a thing of 
the past, along with an 826,000 synonym 
Thesaurus, for that extra inspiration. 

Final Copy II is so easy to learn and use, that 

§' you'll become an accomplished author in no 

fa time at all - but if you need extra help you're 

not on your own as our support hotline is there 

for all UK version users. Look out for the UK 

logo on the box! 



prnuer wun normal worn rrocessor — ^^_^_ _ -^ ^— ^^. ""<= "~"- 

...Final Copy II 

■bmpatible with... I ij FROM all good software d 



Amiga- A5O0/600/600HD/ 1 500/2000/3 000. 
System requirements... min. of 1Mb. RAM and two Floppies 
or a Hard Disk Drive [A600HD requires at least 1.5Mb]. 

•Any Workbench supponed graphic printer, colour or mono, 
including... Citizen 120D, 124D, 224, Swift 9/24, 200/240; 
Star LC10, 20, 200, 24-200, and XB Series Canon BJIOex; 
HP Ink/Paintjet; Postscript™ devices and many more. 



■\ 



.95 

FROM ALL GOOD SOFTWARE DEALERS 



rade 



Distribution by... 



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♦ Meridian Distribution ♦ SDL/Prodis ♦ 
Dealers... Please call Harwoods for your supply of leaflets 
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United Kingdom version imported & supported by... 



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Gordon Harwood Computers • New Street • Alfreton 
Derbyshire • DE55 7BP • Telephone: 0773 836781 



Copy LI encompasses a whole range of other advanced features, here's just a selection: 

♦ Uses the latest Woikbench 2 Style interface on all Amiga'. ♦ On screen command ribbon controls (format your 
document with the simple touch of a button) ♦ 25% to -400^ editable page reduction and magnification command / £ 

♦ Title page, master pages & style sheets ♦ Right/left pages with binding offset ♦ Open multiple s-^$®J\ 
documents ♦ Fast mouse document panning and zDMn/un-zoom ♦ External and internal mail s '\$$& 
merging*Cut.copyandpaste*Searchandreplace*Onscreenmaths* Auto-hyphenation '^o^rffl^ 

♦ Import, resize and crop IFF. HAM and 24Bit ILBM graphics and auto-flow text ^ <^%^ 
around them ♦ Text over graphics ♦ Outline fonts on all .Amiga screens, and am y. u&fl^tt- ° x 
non-PosiscriDt™orPosiscripi^'compatibleprinier*4pointupto300point 
[over 4" high] smooth text printing ♦ Tea leading and spaing ^ -&j\t^ ~\0 
controls ♦ Condensed and expanded characters ♦ Positive 'ict^tS^' 
and negative obliquing ♦ Background printing, ^<fl&\ch^ „-"' „"<•"' 
allowing simultaneous editing & printing of two ^'^ C n j^ S'' j/\ ,'' 
or more documents ♦ Fast proof rjrinring <rf^ArA e<S " """' -'' ^'"' 
farilin ♦ Comprehensive range of ^-^^^^ s - -"" *'' .--"' /' 
additional attractive font ^&%ffi^ (#*' 
volumes available. y y^ .$$.' ' -•"'' 
E.&O.E. ,' W 



^ 



A 






^ 



^ 



AMIGA v CONSOLES 




In the left corner we have Commodore's A3000, with a full 
32 bits of punishing processor power 



THE AMIGA VERSUS CONSOLES 

Battle of the 

With the onslaught of computer games 
consoles, perhaps you are wondering 
what they have that the Amiga does not? 
Toby Simpson compares the two and sees 
what each has to offer 

What with the ever-Increasing popularity of the PC on one side, and the phenomenal growth of 
the console market on the other, the Amiga is becoming sandwiched between a rock and a 
hard place. In the previous pages we've looked at how the Amiga can beat the PC at Its own 
game, but how can it compete with the consoles? 

Whether or not you are a games player, it can't be denied that the Amiga owes its 
enormous popularity to them. If the consoles steal the Amiga's game market, Its position 
begins to look shaky. 

Comparing the Amiga to consoles is like comparing a Porsche Carerra to a BMW 7 series. 
Depending on your needs you buy one or the other. Consoles are designed with video trickery 
as a prime requisite, Amigas with computing power in mind. Let's see how they weigh up... 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



MIPS - Millions of Instructions Per Second. This is a rating of how fast a 
processor is capable of executing machine code instructions. This can 
be a very unreliable way of determining how fast a CPU is. RISC chips 
have fewer, simpler instructions so that they can run faster. The 68000 
series chips found in the Amiga are CISC chips - Complex Instruction 
Set. A CISC chip doing 10MIPS is faster than a RISC chip doing 10MIPS. 
as the RISC chip will require more instructions to perform each complex 
operation. 

DMA - Direct Memory Access. This allows computer hardware to insert 
data directly into a computer's memory without having to go through the 
microprocessor. In the case of Audio DMA, for example, the Audio 
hardware is able to fetch the next byte to send out to the speakers by 
itself, without having to interrupt the processor, and thus not slowing 
your computer down. In the case of the Amiga, many parts of the 
machine all require DMA abilities, and in some cases it is possible to 
slow your computer down because there is simply not enough time for 
everything to get what it wants. 

DSP - Digital Signal Processor. This is a very fast processor designed 
especially for the rapid processing of digital information. With analogue 
to digital and digital to analogue converters they can be used to process 
better than CD quality sound. DSPs are found in modern keyboards and 
other sound studio wizardry. They are used in computers primarily for 
sound and graphics - although most DSPs will turn into FAX machines, 
modems and answering machines simply by changing their software. 

ROM - Read Only Memory. This is memory inside your computer that you 
cannot write to. The Kickstart inside the Amiga is ROM. ROM is non- 
volatile, this means that when the power is switched off, it retains its 
contents. Conventional RAM (Random Access Memory) loses its 
contents when power is lost, and is therefore not suitable to store 
games in for video console cartridges. You can make RAM do the job of 
ROM by adding very expensive battery back-up systems. 

Cartridge - A small plastic case usually containing just a ROM chip with 
information stored on it. More advanced cartridges can have some RAM. 
and batteries to enable information to be saved to them (such as saving 
games on consoles). It is becoming common now for games publishers 
to try and pack other electronic wizardry on to cartridges in order to 
make their games better than their competitors. 



THE AMIGA 



PROCESSOR 

The Amiga comes with the Motorola 
68000 series 16/32-bit micro- 
processor, which ranges from the 
16-bit 68000 chip at 7.14MHz to the 
68040 chip at 33MHz - capable of 
29 million instructions per second 
(MIPS). The more powerful versions 
ship with floating point co-processor 
chips and memory management 
units for better operation. 

VIDEO DISPLAY 

This ranges from 320x200 to 
1280x512. Modes which are 320 
pixels wide are able to use up to 64 
colours from a palette of 4096, or 
using a special graphics mode called 
HAM, can display up to 4096 
colours. 

Video display hardware is 
advanced and has a graphics co- 
processor called the copper, which 
can execute three simple 
instructions allowing some stunning 
video trickery, including mirroring 
effects and placing more colours on 
the screen than you thought 
possible! Other graphics modes 
include productivity mode, 640x900 
and VGA 4 colour. Dual playfields 
enable two independent screens to 
be overlaid with colour on the front 
one being transparent. This effect is 
used frequently and almost entirely 
in games. 

SPRITE HARDWARE 

Eight sprites, 16 pixels wide with no 
height limitations. Sprites are 
composed of up to three colours. By 
merging two sprites together, 
however, it is possible to make them 
16 colours. Sprites can be scrolled 
in hardware. 



AUDIO HARDWARE 

This is composed of four channels, 
two on the left channel and two on 
the right channel. Each channel 
supports 8-bit sample outputs using 
DMA. Channels can produce some 
clever effects by modulating one 
channel with another. Volume is 
controllable on 64 levels. 

OPERATING SYSTEM 

The Amiga features complex pre- 
emptive multi-tasking with an 
advanced graphics user interface. 

GAMES SOFTWARE 

A wide range of titles is available for 
the Amiga. Prices vary from as little 
as £1.99 for cheap budget titles to 
as much as £39.99 for some of the 
more advanced gaming software. The 
type of software varies considerably 
from simulation software to state-of- 
the-art platform games. 

APPLICATIONS 
SOFTWARE 

An extensive choice exists in this 
area. Although not as comprehensive 
as the IBM PC, the Amiga sports 
impressive business applications. 

EXPANSION 

The Amiga can be expanded in a 
variety of ways. Its speed, memory 
and facilities can be expanded 
greatly. You can add industry 
standard modems, printers and 
networking. 

FUTURE 

The future is bright. Commodore will 
want to keep future Amigas as 
compatible with existing models as 
possible. Commodore has said that 
we can expect it to continue 
enhancing the Amiga range. 



34 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



GIANTS 



AMIGA v CONSOLES 



THE CONSOLE 



PROCESSOR 

This varies. Older 8-bit consoles 
tended to have Z80-based chips 
inside them. The Sega Megadrive 
has the 68000 chip, as does the 
Amiga. Super Nintendos have an 
advanced version of the 6502 chip 
that was found in the Commodore 64 
and BBC Micro. Consoles are not 
designed to do raw processing work, 
and rely on advanced custom video 
hardware to perform their work, so 
processor speed and power is not as 
important. The amount of colours 
varies; from 512 to 32768. (The 
latter refers to the Super Nintendo.) 

VIDEO DISPLAY 

Resolutions are limited usually to 
choices such as 320x200, or 
256x200. Higher resolutions are not 
usually needed for games. Consoles 
more than make up for this with 
playfield hardware far superior to the 
Amiga. 

One console can have up to four 
independently scrolling screens 
overlaid to produce some stunning 
paralaxing effects. Most modern 
console hardware can automatically 
character map on to 8x8, 16x16 or 
32x32 blocks on the screen making 
games which make displays that are 
built from blocks very easy to write 
indeed. Some even have hardware 
based graphic enlargement, rotation 
and reduction hardware built-in. 

SPRITE HARDWARE 

This area is particularly advanced. 
Sprites consist of multiple 
multicoloured independent sprites of 
varying sizes which are typically up to 
128 sprites of 64x64 pixels. All of 
these could behave as like the Amiga 
sprites but are simply more powerful. 

AUDIO HARDWARE 

This varies. Because of the shortage 
of ROM space on cartridges, modern 
console audio hardware tends to be 
advanced synthesis hardware rather 
than a sample playback machine. 
Samples use a lot of memory. A 
typical sound-tracker style tune on 
the Amiga may use up to 250K. 
Cartridges are expensive to 
produce, and the more ROM space 
you require on them, the more 



expensive they become. Some 
consoles now have DSPs (Digital 
Signal Processors) inside them to 
increase their ability in this field. 
Some DSPs can handle compressed 
data, making them ideal for console 
based applications. 

OPERATING SYSTEM 

This is basic, if indeed there is one - 
very few consoles have any operating 
system whatsoever, and those that 
do have a very simple selection of 
functions available. 

Programmers for consoles are 
expected to be programming the 
video hardware directly, and there 
are no uses for an operating system 
as it would be the first thing that a 
programmer would disable when 
writing a game anyway! 

GAMES SOFTWARE 

There's certainly no shortage on this 
score. And it's very good as well. 
Games software is what these 
machines are designed to use, and 
this they do very well. Some of the 
modern games consoles, such as 
the Super Nintendo and Sega 
Megadrive, have the kind of smooth 
scrolling effects which would blow 
your socks off. The range of software 
is good, but not nearly as good as on 
the Amiga. The cartridges are 
expensive, usually upwards of £25. 

APPLICATION SOFTWARE 

There is none to speak of. 
Occasionally a software house will 
release a cartridge that is supposed- 
ly an application rather than a game. 
Most are junior paint packages. 

EXPANSION 

Expansion possibilities are bleak. 
Although there is a good selection of 
joysticks, guns, and other games- 
playing goodies, if you tried to attach 
a printer, you'd have problems. 

FUTURE 

The games console is around to 
stay, but don't expect individual 
consoles which are here today to be 
supported in the future. As console 
companies enhance their hardware, 
newer models will inevitably be 
incompatible with previous ones. 
This will mean that users have to buy 
a new machine and new software. 



In the right corner 

we have Sega's 

Megadrive. It's 

lean and mean, 

but lacking a 

keyboard 




CONSOLING THOUGHTS 



If you want a machine purely for 
games, and for nothing else 
whatsoever, and you are prepared to 
pay the huge prices for cartridges, 
then a console Is the machine for 
you. But don't expect to be still using 
it in a couple of years time - unless 
you're lucky. The console market Is 
moving much faster than the home 
computer market, and future models 
are unlikely to be compatible. 
Whereas you can enhance your Amiga 
by adding a faster processor, you 
simply cannot do this sort of thing 
with a console, which limits them 
considerably. When Sega brings out 
its next block-busting Sega Super- 
Mega-Hyper drive, it Is likely to have 
specifications which will amaze and 
astonish you. If you want one though, 
it'll be a case of selling the old... and 
buying the new... 

Consoles are packed with 
advanced custom video hardware. 
They are extremely good at what they 
do. If you need to have this illustrated 
to you, just pop down to your local 
dealer and ask to see a game such as 
Sonic the Hedgehog on the Sega 
Megadrive. That sort of smooth rapid 
scrolling and sprite handling is far 
beyond the Amiga's capabilities. The 
people at Nintendo and Sega are 
experts at what they do. Sega, for 
example, produces some of the most 
stunning arcade machines you have 
ever seen. The games consoles you 
buy are simply cheaper sub-sets of 
those arcade machines, and this is 
reflected in the quality of the software. 

If you are expecting to word 
process, save data, use a modem, 
play around with programming - or in 
fact anything at all that is not related 
to games - you ought to be seriously 
considering enhancing your Amiga 
instead. 

The problem with consoles, as far 
as Amiga owners are concerned, lies 



squarely with the sheer volume of 
units that companies such as Sega 
and Nintendo are selling: both of them 
expect to sell well over half a million 
units this year. So what? Games have 
traditionally sold the A500, and games 
are what are primarily selling the A600 
now. Should buyers decide to buy the 
consoles instead of the Amiga 
machines then Commodore loses unit 
sales. There's another catch... 
software houses. 

It's simply a matter of economics. 
If you can develop a game for a 
console and sell 200.000 units, while 
the Amiga version might only achieve 
30,000, which are you going to do? 
Unfortunately for the Amiga, more and 
more software houses are making the 
decision to slow down, if not 
discontinue Amiga games 
development. It's just not bringing in 
the money any longer. Consoles make 
better economical sense. You can 
develop a game on the Sega much 
more easily than on the Amiga: there's 
no operating system to worry about, no 
extensive programming rules. You 
don't have to worry that the user of a 
Sega Megadrive might have a 68030 
chip and a hard disk attached. This, 
with the severe lack of piracy on the 
consoles, and the copies you can sell 
are attractive with a capital A. 

What can we do? Very little. If 
every Amiga owner who had pirated 
software went out and bought the 
originals, the result could be stunning. 
Software piracy is illegal and immoral. 
As long as it continues in such 
quantity, you'll gradually see less and 
less of the state-of-the-art games 
coming on to the Amiga. Unless 
Commodore can penetrate the corpo- 
rate computer market sooner rather 
than later, it too is going to suffer. 

Let's hope it's a good Christmas 
for Commodore and software houses 
worldwide. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



35 









FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE (LEEDS) Tel: 0532 319444 



THE FIRST 
COMPUTER CENTRE 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

OPEN MON - SAT 9.30AM-5.30PM 

SUNDAY OPENING 1 1 .00AM-3.00PM 

THURSDAY NIGHT LATE...9.3OAM-7.30PM 

AUTHORISED DEALERS FOR STAR, 

CITIZEN, COMMODORE, ACORN, 

ROMBO & SUPRA 

FREE DELIVERY/ 
HOWTO ORDER 

Order by telephone quoting your credit 
card number. If paying by cheque please 
make payable to FIRST COMPUTER 
CENTRE. In any correspondance please 
quote a contact phone number and post 
code. Allow 5 working days for cheque 
clearance 

jAII prices include VAT and 
Standard Delivery 
)AII hardware/computers are 
genuine UK spec. 
)Free Fast Standard 4 to 7 day 
Delivery 

^Guaranteed 2 to 3 day Delivery 
only £2.00 

'Guaranteed Next Day Delivery 
only £4.50 
>Open seven days a week for 
your convenience 
'Overseas orders welcome 

Technical & Sales 6UNES 

24 HOUR MAIL ORDER SERVICE!! 



ICOMPUTERS 

["mci^AMlGA 600 & 600HD 



Comes with Workbench 2.05 and mouse 
plus built in integral hard disk opi 



Drive.only £269.99 
w riD HD....only £426.99 

40 Mb HD only £499.99 

"IMbHD only £529.99 



a that only the 20Mb and No Hard 
veralon come with on gicomafriten 

rnoiith 



AMIGA 600 bundl 



with Epic, Rome, Myth, & Trivial Pursuit, 
Dictionary, Language Lab & Deluxe Paint i 



only £29.99 (with A600) 
AMIGA 600 r 



2.05 ROM's fitted making incompatibility a 
thing of the pa 



A600HD Deluxe only £509.99 
or £549.99 for 2 m» ram 

AMIGA 1 500 Plus 

Wi(l,>,(i*l!i'l;i|..ii il,l|.i.ii(!Vi"i.i:{i.ihili ' M " 

only £499.99 
AMIGA 1 500 Plus 

Business & Entertainment pack 



Picnic, Elf, 

Amlg boo k & Jo ystick. 12 months 



AMIGA 1 500 Deluxe 

Willi «.in i.v.i, ll.i.inl. liWi Mn.n-i, I.W/ 
i:., : l-.ij l;l ■ I ". . 1 . i j - 



24 HOUR MAIL ORDER SERVICE!! Ollly £559.99 

AC-J9 7IQ444 AMIGA 3000 RANGE 



CUSTOMER CARE: 

0532 637988 
FAX: 0532 319191 

PLEASE ADDRESS ALL 
CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

DEPTAS,UNIT3 

ARMLEY PARK COURT 

OFF CECIL STREET 

STANNINGLEY ROAD 

LEEDS, LSI 2 2AE 

Prices are subject to change 
without notice, E&OE. 



25 Mhz with 52 Mb HD, 2Mb RAM.i 1 399.99 
25Mhi with 105 MbHD i\ 599.99 






nntU'M'j 



Rom Amiga A570 



\ lid \j ,'UiO 



only £329.99 

:DTVTrackerball 



cbmple'ti 
CDTV Q 




ly £74.99 

'V keyboard 



M iiiiUTifl.ircl Amiga. 



PRINTERS*^ 



All our printers are UK spec 



All our primers Inc ribboiu and free nd printer cable. All Citizen printer* 
come wkhi2year guarantee. Allprinten have ifall UK iptafiabon. 



canon mma 



HEWLETT SrJL 
PACKARD 



mm? 



ONITOR 



StarLC20 £136.99 

1 80 cps draft, 45 cps NLQ, quiet mode and multi 
fonts, push button operation. 

New Star LC 1 00 Colour...£ 179.99 

8 resident fonts, 1 80cps draftMScps NLQ. Quiet mode 

Star LC200 colour..£ 1 95.99 

9 pin colour, 8 fonts, 225 cps draft, 45 cps NLQ. A4 
landscape printing. 

New Star LC24- 1 00..£POA 
Star LC24-20 £199.99 

24 pin quality, 2 1 cps draft, 60 cps LQ, 1 6K buffer 
cxpandible to 48K, 1 fonts and LCD frontdisplay. 

Star LC24-200 mono...£2 1 9.99 

24 pin, 222 cps draft, 67 cps LQ, 10 fonts, A4 
landscape. 7k buffer expandable to 39K 

Star LC24-200 colour.£269.99 

Colour version with 30K buffer expandable to 62K 

StarXB24-200colour....£379.99 

Professional quality with On-site maintenance, 
very quiet. 

Star SJ48 Bubble jet £2 1 9.99 

Laser quality, ultra quiet, Epson compatible, 
portable in size. 

Star Laserjet 4 £ 1029.99 

Adobe compatible, I years on site maintenance 

Star LC20Autosheet feeder £59.99 

Star LC200Autosheet feeder £62.99 

Star LC24-20 Autosheet feeder...£64.99 
Star LC24-200 Autosheetfeeder.£64.99 

StarSJ48Autosheetfeeder £52.99 

Citizen Swift 9 Colour £ 1 83.99 

Excellent value 9 pin colour. Highly recommended 

NEW Swift 240 Colour....£279.99 

24 pin, 240cps draft, 1 fonts, quiet mode, 240cps. 

NEW Swift200 Colour £224.99 

Same out put as the 2-10 hut with loss facilities 

Semi auto sheetfeeder £29.99 

Automatic Sheetfeeder....£79.99 
Canon BJ I Oex £229.99 

Laser quality output. Larger buffer than the 
StarSJ48Canon/Starbubblejet cartridges £17.99 

Canon BJ20 £309.99 

Built in auto sheet feeder and extra facilities than 

Canon BJ300 £379.99 

Desktop bubble jet with laser quality 

Canon BJ330 £519.99 

Wide carriage version of the BJ300 

BJ I Oex Autosheetfeeder...£52.99 
Hewlett Packard Printers 



HP500 mono £349.99 

HP 500 Colour £529.99 

HP500 mono cartridges....£ 1 4.99 

All HP printers come with a 3 year warranty 



FIRST EXTRAS PACK 



With the FIRST EXTRAS Pack you 
can make sure you have every thing 
you need when buying an Amiga . All 
the essentials required for the first 
time buyer and at a bargain price.'.' 
Comprises: 

• Top quality microswitched 
Powerplay Cruiser joystick 

• Mouse Mat 

• Dust Cover 

• 10 high quality Blank Disks 

• Plus £70.00 of software!.' 

only £29.99 

RRP £95.00.'.'/ 



All our monitors are UK spec. 

All monitors come complete 

with a free Amiga lead 



buying what you think is a similar monitor at a lower 
price but it is likely to be a "GREY" import. These 
monitors do not comply with British safety standards 
and are not covered by an official warranty 

PHILIPS CM8833mk2 



only £199.99 uk s P ec. 

Commodore 1 084/5 SD I 

[ri-iniv .'.i rir.l r.lmlin t'.|l - I ■■• I 

only £209.99 



./• ( ok, 






389.99 

■ ■I'll I Hi l:'-l I I (•(• Villi'" ' !-l I' 
A500 VERSION £489.99 

GOLDSTAR REMOTE 






now only £179.99 

COMMODORE 1 960 multisync 

■nly £436.99 



(IWIivuMlJL! 



TILTS SWIVEL STANDS ill" 

14 MONITOR COVERS «M 

SUPRA MODEMS^ 

The New super fast 

Supra-Fax Modem 
V.32 bis (1 4400 baud.'!!) 



5Mr 



only £259.99/.'.' 

Supra Fax Plus 

(upto9600BPS) 



■ ■ 



■ IllilMllM-L U. 'r. mi' WVll -j'l . ■ 

u'.ii-in i lJ_'1i -• ■ mniiit t/\i 

only £139.99 

Supra 24 

||,l. ,,. I f, l-U'll |u 'I" 

Mllllll'l U' Sl'|'l. I . ' I'll 
|||L. III! Ml.'.', in , L 



only £9, 



I GqC on lino using thl no.nem 

with atito'eiial IQUbnud Haycscomp, 

V22 BIS. Inc 



IDI 

AMIGA 12 



Replacing the famous Complete Colour 
Solution, this new package from ROMBO is 
even better value!!! 

The ultimate low cost colour digitiser. No 
filters or RGB splitter required. Colour images 
can be captured In less than a second, mono 
images are grabbed in real lime. Fully 
compatible with any video source. 

Includes multitasking software, cut & paste 
with masking, multiframe store with animated 
playback, composite or s-video input. 4096 
HAM support and many more advanced 
features. 

only £77.99 
or £99.99 

with built in 
MEGA MIX MASTER// 



THE POWER 
SCANNER 

only £94.99 

Colour version only £229.99 

MICE & TRACKERBALLS 

NAKSHA MOUSE 

only £24.99 

ROCTEC MOUSE 






only £13. 



|-/V KE 2 GOLDEN IMAGE Happy mouse 



This is latest animation package for the Amiga from 
Ronibo. Features include load and save from D. Paint 
animations and IFF files. Supports HAM graphics 

only £39.99 



EMULATORS 



KCS Power board 

Regarded as one of the best emulators on the marker 

only £179.99 

1 500/2000 adaptor only £S9.99 MS-DOS 4.01 ...£15.00 extra 

New Commodore 386-25 

This is :i PC i86-25SX Bridgoboard running at 25 MHz 

only £439.99 
TheNewGVP l6MhzPC-286 

for use with the GVP Series II HD8 * or G VP AS3Q 
hard disc drives 

only £239.99 
VORTEX AT0ncePlusl6Mhz 

now with 1 6Mhi speed only £214.99 



A500 PLUS & A600 RAM 
BY PRIMA 



quality RAM modules will take your ASO0 Plus or the new A600 
(ine built in real time clock) up to 2 Mb ol chip RAM without 
invalidating your warranty A500p A60 „ 



MEGAMIX MASTER Deluxepaint3 



only £ I 9.99 Unpopulated only £I6.99.£23.99 

GOLDEN IMAGE Brush mouse with Populated to 5 1 2K..only £27.99.£32.99 
Deluxe paint 3 Populated to I Mb..only £34.99.£39.99 



This is a low cost 8bit, high spec sampler that plugs into 
your printer pore Special effects include echo that can 
be added in real time, fully multitasking and easy to use. 

\ only £29.99 

/We recommend all ROMBO products 



PRIMA ROM SHARERS 



rtnlv S?4 QQ I aoOorom ■■mn'.ii\~m li in hi M 

\J 1 1 1 J L.i.1.7 7 \SHARERJS««u» »m older software will not ran on the new 2.04 operating 

UOiaen image OptlCalmOUSe 111.19 , Pnoem. ) ROM sharer. Recognised as being At baton the market. 

ZydecTrackerball... £29 99 '*"* "^ sharer feature! a flfioMe ribbon connection so that it can 

_ .. - ' """' be positioned anywhere within four ASM Plus or A600. Full 2 year 

Golden Image Crystal Trackball. ,.£36.99 replacement .arrant. 



HARD DRIVES 

& ACCELERATORS 



GVP HARD DRIVES 
& ACCELERATORS 



AMIGA A500 HARD DRIVES 

GVPSeriesllHD8+52Mb only £329.99 

GVPScriesll HD8+ 1 20Mb Only £4 I 9.99 

GVP SeriM II HD8+ MOMb only £669.99 

A500 GVP Combo's 

A5]0Combo40MrWS2MbHD only£649.99 

AS30Combo40MHi/l20MbHD only £759.99 

A5)0 Combo 40MHiJ2«MbHD only £989.99 

48882 Co-ProctssorKitforA!30 only £209.99 

GVP memory RAM 

8mbRAMcardAMIGAI500/2M0with2mb....only£l49.99 

3!bit60nilMbSIMM for Accelerator....... only £64.99 

J2bit60ni4MbSIMMfor Accelerator only £ I 79.99 

1 500/2000 Hard Drives 

Impact Scries IIHC8*Conirolcard only £ 1 24.99 

lmpattSericsllHC8*with!2MbHD only £269.99 

ImpactSeriesllHCS+svithliOMbHD..... only£409.99 

lmpactStrieillHC8twith240MbHD only £639.99 

lmpattSeriesllHC8«with420MbHD only £ 1 039.99 

1 500/2000 G-FORCE ACCELERATORS 

G-Force030-25MHz with IMb32bitRAM.only £549.99 
G-Forcc030-40MHiwith4Mb32bitRAM.onlyt789.99 

G.For«030-S0MH!with4Mb32bitRAM only£l 109.99 

G-Force 040-28MHz with 2Mb 32 bit RAM for A3000 

only £1499.99 

Syquest 88Mb + Cartridge & HC8+ 

-^ only £559.99 

w.AAH GVP products come with a 
■V. J full 2 year warranty 

NEW IDE 500 
TRUMP CARD 

Similar to a GVP hard drive but 
accomodating any std IDE bard drive. 8 
Mb of RAM available using standard SIMMS 

only £129.99 

without drive 

or £299.99 

with 44Mb Seagate HD fitted. 
External PSU £37.9? 






DISK DRIVES 



Roclite 3.5" 

only £57.99 

Cumana 3.5" 

now only £52.99 

GOLDEN IMAGE Tracker drive 

only £54.99 

GENLOCKS 



now only £19.99 or £27.99 for 
keyboard switchable version 



DRAM & CUSTOM CHIPS 



Inib by 8'9 SIMMS 

4Mbby9Slmms 

I Mb by 4 DRAMS 

I Mbby4ZIPS 



. ...£22 99 per Mb 

£95.99 pci-4Mb 

£POAper4Mb 

only £38.99 per Mb 



256 by 4 DRAM (DILs) ideal for A590 and otheri 



4*(5I2K) 

8* (I Mb) 

l6*(2Mb) 

Ktdtstart 1. 3 

Kicltstart 2.04.. 



657 I 0326Kcyboardcontroller. 
CIA8520A Disc controller 



only £3.29 
..now only £3.09 
..now only £2.89 

£22.99 

£33.99 

.£30.99 

£21.99 

...£9 99 

£7 99 



Rocgen 



■ accessories 



[lay and keyhoie 



8 pass, 



only £11 
ROCGEN ROCKEY 



SUPRA RAM 



in (10 Mb will 
[j jiision jinrr AllCi 

1 Mb. |l 



pop to 1Mb £89.99 

. ._ pop to 2 Mb rut 4ap,)....£l 14.99 
8Mb pop to 2 Mb ( i M b > ,, pi) ...£ I 39.99 
8Mb pop to 4 Mb....£l94.99 

8Mb pop to 8 Mb £299.99 

8Mb pop to 2 Mb for 2000/ 
1500 range £149.99 

-'2K RAM EXPANSION 



This RA 

your Am tga warranty U 



Pro-Midi 2 Interface featuring midi in'out/thrn. 
and 2 switchable midi out/thru sockets.. .only £24.99 

Mouse/joystick port switcher only £13.99 

ComputerVideoScartSwitch only £19 99 

2 way Parallel port sharer bo» inc cable.only £17 99 

n's 

— nam. only £36.99 

PRINTERFACE (ADDITIONAL PRINTER PORT 

FOR THE 1 500/200013000) 

QUALITY MOUSE MATS 

25 CAPACITY DISK BOX 

40CAPLOCKABLE DISK BOX £4.99 

1 00 CAP LOCKABLE DISK BOX £6.99 

•90CAPSTACKABLEBANXBOX £8.99 

1 50 CAP ST ACKABLE POSSO BOX... 



ddivery when purchase withotherprodutt or when Duying 7. or more. 

AMIGA A500DUSTCOVER £3.99 

AMIGA600COVER £2.99 

1 4" MONITOR DUSTCOVER £6.99 

12'MONITORDUSTCOVER £5 99 

AMIGA TO SCART CABLES £9.99 

STD 1 .8 METRE AMIGA PRINTER LEAD.. £4.99 

MODEM AND NULL MODEM CABLES £9.99 

2 WAY Parallel port sharer.. ...£17.99 



SOFTWARE, 

WORD PROCESSING/DTP ( N 

\\ r\\fj oo\r 

PLATINUM WORKS & HOME ACCOUNTS* 



only £44.99.'! 
FINAL COPY Itiifi version!! 






ew.'KINDWORDS V3 



only £37.99 
PENPAL 1.4 

only £53.99 

PAGESTREAM2.2 
only £126.99 Fonts pack £43.99 

Hot Links £49.99 

Pacesetter 2DTP £42.99 

Pro Page professional V3 OTP £ 1 29 99 

Prote»l4.3 W/P now (inly £19 99 

Wordworth II word publisher £72.99 

VIDEO AND GRAPHICS 

DIGI-VIEW GOLD MEDIA SYSTEM 



now only £ I 19.99 

3 7 Compugraphic fonts Vol I only £9.99 each 

37 Compugraphic fonts Vol 2 only £9.99 each 

Amiga Vision now only £19.99 

Ant Magic £69 99 

Art Department Pro 2.1 only £99.99 

Deluxe Paint 2 now only £4.99 

Deluxe Paint 3 now only £ 1 2.99 

Dclu..Paint4 now only £57,99 

EXPERTDRAW only£49.99 

EXPERT4DJR onl,£37.99 
FleMidump printer utilr- 
Imagine V2 
Pixmato 
Pro Vidro Plus 

Seal. 1 500 £77.99 

TAKE ^animation by ROMBO £44.99 

TURBO PRINT £49.99 

TVToxtPro £83.99 

Vista £29.99 

Vista Pro 2 (2 Mb required) £69 99 

WaltDisneyAiM. £64 99 

MUSIC/SOUND 

AegfeSonfx £39.99 

Audio Master version 4 £39 99 

Audio Engineer £ 1 69.99 

Broadcast Titier 2 only £149 99 

Deluii-'MusicCostructionSei £54 99 

Music x JUNIOR 

Only £12.99 RRP £49.99 
Si-uu.-iicerOne £49 99 

PROGRAMMING 

Amiga Logo programming for kids £19.99 

Amos Creatu' £34.99 

Amos Compiler 

Amos 3D 

DEVPAC3 

Easy AMOS t^q.VY 

GFA BASIC) .5 Interp. otor only £ 1 9 99 

HiSoft Basic 

HiSoft Basic Extend 

Lattice C Version 

UTILITIES 






£39.99 

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uly £149.99 
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All our J.S' dun are GUARANTEED FOR A LIFETIME ind arc 
CERTIFIED IMS ERROR FREEdoubfciided.double density dlilu are high 
quality magnetic media and are extensively used by duplicating houses 



QTY 



^^^^^m^^ 



now only 
NEWCrossDosVS 
Opus Directory 

QUARTERBACK VS 



\BMNDED\ 




10 £4.99 £6.99 

30 £14.29 £17.99 

SO £21.99 £28.99 

100.. ..£39.99 £54.99 

200....£72.99 £99.99 

500 £ 1 69.99 £POA 

1 000. £339. 99 £POA 

Sony Branded disks come complete 
with labels 

Disk Label5.„.500.,.now only £6.99 
Disk Labels.. 1 000....now only £9.99 



now only C. 
Quarterback Tools now only £36.99 

Xcopy Pro inc. hardware £33.99 

BUSINESS 

Home Accounts 2 ( 

INTERSPREAD 



i presoi 



only £ 

Superbase Personal £19 99 

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Distant Suns new version!! £34.99 

GB Route Plus £54.99 

GP FAX Software £39.99 

A Talk conims Software £9 99 



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83 RAILWAY ROAD 



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sTl r e d s w o a n r l e v 0942 682204 

sTl f e t s w o a n r l e y 0942 682205 

■SB? 0942 682206 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 



ALL CHEQUES, P.O., 
ETC SHOULD BE MADE 
PAYABLE TO OMEGA 
PROJECTS LTD. WE 
ALSO TAKE ACCESS, 
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& EUROCARD 



SOUND ENHANCER 



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IF NOT SATISFIED WITH THIS PRODUCT SIM- 
PLY RETURN FOR A NO QUIBBLE REFUND. 
THIS IS HOW SURE WE ARE THAT YOU WILL 
BE MORE THAN IMPRESSED. YOU'VE GOT 
TO HEAR IT TO BELIEVE IT 

100% COMPATIBLE 
WITH ALL SOFTWARE 

IF YOU THOUGHT THAT THE AMIGA SOUND WAS GOOD THEN YOU ARE IN FOR A REAL SHOCK, 
AS YOU CAN ENHANCE THE SOUND TO NEW HEIGHTS WITH THE BRAND NEW RELEASE 
FROM OMEGA PROJECTS: LOOK OUT FOR THE REVIEWS 



NOW WITH BASS 
ENHANCEMENT 



CSA 
ROCKET LAUNCHER 

A BRAND NEW PRODUCT to enable 
people that own the Commodore 
A2630 Accelerator to Increase Its speed 
to a full 50MHz while retaining full origi- 
nal compatibility. So dont even think 
about swapping your original card for a 
faster one until you have seen the 
ROCKET LAUNCHER. 

595.00 

TURBO CHARGE YOUR CBM 
A2630 ACCELERATOR 



ST-506 HARD DRIVE INTERFACE 
£69.95 A500ONLY 



KICKSWITCH ROM SWITCHER 

DOES NOT REQUIRE MACHINE TO BE SWITCHED OFF TO SWAP ROMS 

1 . RIBBON CABLE MOUNTED 24.95 |Bare| 

2. WORKS WITH ACCELERATORS 44.95 |lnc 1 .3 Rom) 

3. AUDIBLE SWITCH OVER 49.95 (inc 2 x Rom| 

4. EASY INSTALLATION 

5. FULLY AUTOMATIC 



150/250Meg SCSI 
TAPE STREAMER 

The ULTIMATE back-up device 
INTERNAL 449.95 

AMIGA DOS 2.0 
EXTERNAL 549.95 COMPATIBLE 



AMI-BACK 

m« WOBJS taM, moit imtk had dSk bock-w uMy avail- 
able lo* the AMIGA, flocki up to 4 (loppy drive* Cnot 2 live the 
compeliloa) oc lo TAP£ STREAMER without the need lor additional 
software, has a built* SCHEDULER. Selective back-up, or DUk 
Image Guaranteed, better than any other on the morket. 

v9nM oe AMIGA DOS 2.0 
V2.0 49.95 COMPATIBLE 



V-LAB VIDEO DIGITISER 
£299.95 

Real time frame grabber for A1500 



AMIGA A600 & A600/HD 

This latest addition to the Amiga range of home 
computers is the ideal solution for those of you on 
the move, due to its size & internal TV Modulator. 
Comes complete with 1 meg ram, Mouse, PSU, 20 
Megabyte internal Hard Drive (A600/HD). 
1 YEAR ON-SITE WARRANTY FREE 

A600 349.95 

A600/HD 499.95 

New SOFTWARE included PACKS 



SUPRA RAM 500 RX 

External memory expansion for Amiga 
500 & 500 Plus. Adas up to 8 meg. 

1 Meg 119.95 4 Meg 199.95 

2 Meg 149.95 8 Meg 349.95 



TRUMPCARD PROFESSIONAL 
HARD DRIVE SYSTEMS 

A500 44MEG 299.95 
A500 105MEG 399.95 
PLUS UP TO 8 MEG RAM 



BARE SCSI and IDE DRIVES 



Quantum 

Quantum 

Quantum 

Quantum 

Fujitsu 

DEC 

SCSI Case. 



52Meg 
105Meg 
170Meg 
210Meg 
44 Meg 
850 Meg 
inc PSU 



199.95 
329.95 
449.95 
639.95 
179.95 
1299.95 
109.95 



200 WATT PSU 

COMPLETE WITH A500 POWER 
CABLE & OPTIONAL HARD 
DRIVE POWER LEAD 

SfK™ 79.95 ^N COOLED 



VORTEX 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE BOARD 

25Mhz - 386SX PC Emulator 

A1500 

£479.95 



A600 upgrade drives 

These 2.5" Drives will fit NEATLY 
inside your Amiga 600. 

20 Meg £139-95 

60 Meg £229-95 

80 Meg £299-95 

ICD NOVIA DRIVES 

These FULLY internal Hard Drives 
do NOT require you to remove 
your DFO. 

60 Meg £239.95 
80 Meg £329-95 
120 Meg £499-95 



SYQUEST REMOVEABLE HARD DRIVES 
44Meg inc. cartridge 399.95 

88Meg inc. cartridge 499.95 



GVP SERIES II 

A1500/2000 COMBO ACCELERATOR 

25Mhz + lMeg 569.95 

40Mhz + 4meg 899.95 

50Mhz + 4meg 1449.95 

A5O0/500+ AS30 ACCELERATOR 

52 Meg + 40Mhz + 1 Meg £699.95 

120 Meg + 40 Mhz + 1 Meg £799.95 

240 Meg + 40 Mhz + 1 Meg £1039.95 

HARD DRIVES 

1500 500 



52 

105 

120 

170 

240 



259.95 
399.95 
429.95 
599.95 
699.95 



359.95 
479.95 
499.95 
N/A 
799.95 



ICD 

Flicker Free Video 2 

199.95 

Inc MULTI-SYNC 

499.95 



CSA MEGA-MIDGET RACER 

The UKs biggest selling ACCELERATOR card. For the A500/2000. 
Offering a modular design allowing you to buy what you can afford then 
expand later. Up to 38Mhz CPU + 50Mhz Co-pro + 8 Meg 32bit ram + 
512K Shadow (STATIC) ram. 

68030 accelerator 25, 33, 38 Mhz 
Co-Processor socket for 68882 up to 50 Mhz 
68000 socket on board for FALLBACK compatability 
Gives you more power than the A3000 
Optional DRAM expansion up to 8Meg 32 bit ram 
Fits INSIDE A500/1500/2000 easily and quickly 
Creates a monster machine for progs like FALCON etc 
Cuts Ray Tracing times 30x - 60x for SCULPT etc 
Speeds up screen refresh and overall performance 
Lowest price 68030 THAT WORKS ! ! ! I 

As the ONLY OFFICIAL DISTRIBUTORS for CSA we offer a 50% 
buy back policy. This means that if you upgrade you won't be 
stuck with anything. 



25Mhz EC68030 

33Mhz EC68030 

25Mhz MC68030 

33Mhz MC68030 

25MhzEC + 68882 - Special offer 

33MhzEC + 68882 

STATIC RAM (512K) 

2Meg 32Bit ram 

4Meg 32 Bit ram 

8Meg 32Bit ram 

25/25 + SRAM + 2Meg 

33/33 + SRAM + 2Meg 



349.95 
449.95 
449.95 
549.95 
399.95 
599.95 
99.95 
219.95 
399.95 
599.95 
718.95 
879.95 



AMIGA A570 CD-ROM DRIVE 

Complete with the FRED FISH CD ROM 

£369-95 

NOW IN STOCK 



CSA 

40/4 MAGNUM 

68040 28 or 33Mhz 
HIGH SPEED SERIAL PORT 
HIGH SPEED PARALLEL PORT 
4 MEG RAM (standard) 
EXPANDABLE TO 65 Meg RAM 
HIGH SPEED SCSI 1 & 2 CONT 
CALL FOR MORE INFO 

1699.95 

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR 



50MHz CBM A2630 

(Complete ACCELERATOR system with 4Meg 32 Bit Rami 
for the A1500/2000, comprising a FULL version 68030 CPU 
£ 68882 Maths Co-Pro. Expandable to 112 Megabytes o 
true 32 Bit Ram with optional DKB A2632 Expansion board 
Call for other pricing. 

1199.95 



DKB 2632 

32 Bit Memory Expansion for the Amiga A2630 Card 

Now you can go beyond 4 Megabytes of 32 Bit Ram 

on your A2630 Accelerator - The DKB 2632 allows you to 

expand to 112 MEGABYTES 
BARE OK 299.95 32Meg 1399.95 

4Meg 449.95 64Meg 2499.95 

8Meg 599.95 INFORMATION SHEET 

16Mcg 849.95 AVAILABLE 



CONTENTS 
AT-A-GLANCE 

Accelerators ....43, 46, 50, 51, 57, 

60,67 

Agnus 47, 55, 57 

AMOS 61 

ARexx 50 

ASCII 47 

C 61 

Canon printers 50, 57 

CD-ROM 55, 58 

Chip RAM 46, 47, 51, 55, 58 

CIA 46 

Citizen printers 41, 47 

Clock 46, 51 

Commodore printers 68 

Deluxe Paint 50, 54, 58 

Digitisers 58 

Diskcopy 67 

Fast RAM 47 

Floppy drives 50, 51, 66, 67 

Genlocks 43 

GIF 46 

Hard drives .41, 43, 46, 47, 57, 66 

Hewlett-Packard printers 69 

Mac drives 43 

Maths co-processors 46 

MIDI 58 

Modems 47, 50, 55, 57, 60, 66 

Monitors 47, 61, 66, 68 

Multisync monitors 41, 69 

PageSetter 41, 50 

PageStream 54, 67 

Panasonic printers 68 

PCs 47 

PostScript 54, 67 

Professional Page 54, 58, 67 

Protext 50 

ROM sharer 56 

Samplers 57 

Scribble 68 

Sega controllers 66 

Shell 41,67 

SIMMs 51, 57 

Star printers 47, 51 

Startup-sequence 43 

TIFF 46 

Viruses 43, 51, 66 

Zorro 54 



OUR EXPERTS TACKLE YOUR REAL-LIFE PROBLEMS 




m THE CHEAP 



#£ s 



• All your Chip RAM hassles sorted 

• Modem magic for beginners 

• What's best for video - Amiga or PC? 

• Hooking up to MIDI 1 ^L 

• The truth about CD-ROM 



ALL OF YOUR AMIGA 
PROBLEMS SOLVED 



SO WHAT DO ALL THOSE ICONS MEAN? 




Beginners: 
this icon 
will appear 
next to any 
questions which are 
'basic' in content. 

Printers: 
this icon 
denotes a 
query 
about printers, printer 
drivers and so on. 



L 





General: 

this icon is 

used for 

any 
general Amiga-related 
queries. 

Technical: 

any 

queries 

about 
programming will have 
this icon next to them. with video hardware. 




Caution: 
be sure 
that you 
fully 
understand the answer 
before trying it out. 



Video: this 
con 

relates to 
any query 
about using your Amiga 




could we 



Danger: 
the answer 
to this 
question 
nvalidate 



M 




your warranty - or you! 

Music: this 
icon is for 
questions 
about 
MIDI, sampling, 



Hardware: 
this icon is 
used to 
denote 

questions relating to 

general hardware. 






Programs: 
any 

program- 
specific 



Buying 
advice: we 
use this 
icon if the 

question asks us for 

buying advice. 



Comms: if 
your 
question 
relates to 




queries have this icon comms, this is the icon 



synthesizers and so on. next to them. 



that we'll use. 



-AHjjfS'- 



WHATEVER YOUR PROBLEM WITH THE 

That's the task we have set ourselves in giving you the best 
possible support for your Amiga. We are confident that our experts 
can cope with any technical questions you can throw at them, if 
they don't already know the answer to your problem, they will find it 
out for you. 

We are prepared to deal with any problem you have with the 
Amiga, from general enquiries about AmigaDOS or Workbench, 
through questions about specific pieces of software and hardware, 
to advice on what you need to buy to do a particular task. If it's to 
do with the Amiga, we will help out. What we cannot do Is offer this 
service over the telephone - do not phone us with your enquiries, 
but write to us at the address below. 

We also cannot enter into personal correspondence - all 
enquiries will be dealt with In the pages of the magazine. This does 
mean a bit of a delay in solving your problem, but you'll just have to 
be a little patient and wait for it to appear In print. You won't get a 
personal reply even If you enclose an SAE with your letter, so please 
don't bother. 

Send your question on the form below to: Amiga Answers, Amiga 
Shopper, Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. 

The Amiga Answers panel consists of our consultant editors 



AMIGA, WE ARE HERE TO SOLVE IT 

Mark Smlddy and Jeff Walker - and, of course, our resident deputy 
editor Cliff Ramshaw. We will also be calling on the services of all 
our other contributors, so you won't be able to catch us napping 
whatever the subject of your query. 

Each panelist will be dealing with queries in their own specialist 
area(s) so it would help us greatly if, when writing, you label your 
query envelope with the name of the expert who can solve your 
particular problem. 

Below is a list of areas of expertise. It's a list that we will add to 
and update every month, so you will know who to write to about any 
subjects not mentioned here. 

GaryWhiteley- Video 

Paul Overaa - Programming, music 

Mick Draycott - Hardware, programming, MIDI 

Jeff Walker- Desktop publishing, programming 

Mark Smlddy - AmigaDOS, business, CDTV, hardware projects, 

hard and floppy disk drives 

Jason Holborn - Public Domain, AMOS 

Jolyon Ralph - Programming, hardware, CDTV 

Cliff Ramshaw - All the other bits and pieces 



If you send in a question for the Amiga Answers experts, please fill 
in and include the form below (or a photocopy if you don't want to 
cut up your magazine). And please also make sure that you include 
all the relevant details - version numbers of software and so on - 
so that we have the best chance of helping you. Send your form and 
question to: Amiga Answers, Amiga Shopper, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath 
BA1 2BW. Sorry, but we cannot personally reply to any questions - even 
if you include an SAE. 

Name: 



Hard disk: Mb as DH_: Manufacturer 



Extra RAM fitted - type, size In Mb and manufacturer . 



Details of any other hardware which could help us to answer your question: 



Address: 



Now, use this space to describe your problem, Including as much relevant 
information as possible. Please continue on a separate sheet if necessary. 



Your machine: 
A500 Q A1000 □ 

A2000 Q A3000Q 

Approximate age of machine:. 



A1500Q 



Klckstart version (displayed at the 'insert Workbench' prompt) 

1.2 □ 1.3 Q 2.x Q 

Workbench revision (written on the Workbench disk) 

1.2 □ 1.3 □ 1.3.2 □ 2.x Q 

PCB revision (If known). Do not take you machine apart just to look 

for this! 

Total memory fitted (see AVAIL in Shell for 1.3 Workbench) 

Chip memory available (see AVAIL In Shell) 

Agnus chip (If known) 

Extra drive #1 (3.5"/5.25") as DF_: Manufacturer 

Extra drive #2 (3.5"/5.25") as DF_: Manufacturer 



AS 19 



Mti AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



NO PROBLEM! 



Nms. 



Welcome once more to Amiga Answers, the 
section of the magazine where we endeavour to 
straighten out your hassles with that wonderful 
but occasionally stubborn machine, the Amiga. 
Every month we devote more space and apply 
more resources than any other Amiga magazine 
to solving your problems. We receive something 
like 100 queries a week, so the service is 
obviously appreciated. 

It's my job to co-ordinate the whole thing: 
sorting through the questions and sending them 
off to the relevant chappies for the kind of In- 
depth answers you've come to expect; and 
compiling them into the lovingly crafted pages 
which you see before you. 

I call on a variety of expertise to make sure 
you get the answers you need, which Is why 
Amiga Answers is so successful. There's Mark 
Smiddy, Industry guru, AmigaDOS-tamer and 
business applications wizard; Jeff Walker, 



probably the most knowledgeable Amiga desktop 
publisher there Is; and Jason Holborn. long-time 
AMOS explorer and PD sampler, as well as good 
all-rounder (or should that be all round good 
guy?); and Toby Simpson, lead programmer for 
Millennium and accelerator expert. 

If It's a question about video, I'll pass it on 
to Gary Whrteley, our professional videographer 
for whom the word 'genlock' means 'mixing 
Amiga graphics with video for magical results' 
and for whom the word 'snipwirral' means nothing. 

Programming queries are dealt with by Paul 
Overaa, who's not afraid to code In any 
language, and who doubles as a MIDI maestro to 
solve your sequencing slip-ups. 

Our hardware guru is Jolyon Ralph. This man 
knows just about everything about disks, both 
hard and floppy, and what he doesn't know about 
memory he's probably forgotten. Communication 
breakdowns are fixed-up by Phil Harris. 



All in all, a formidable team, supplemented 
by my own not inconsiderable Amiga suss. Let's 
face it, if we can't answer your question, it's 
probably one of the Mysteries of the Universe. 

This month we answer the enormous number 
of queries we've had regarding cheap accelerator 
options, give the low-down on Amiga 
communications for beginners, and dispel a few 
myths about CD-ROM. We also give directions on 
setting up a multimedia system, analyse the 
problems facing buyers of second-hand monitors, 
and much more. 

Don't forget to keep sending us those 
problems - we love them! 

Cheers, 



WHAT HAVE I GOT? 

His the drive inside my 
A590 a SCSI/XT/ 
IDE/ Godknows 
what? My drive 
connects on to the XT connector. Is 
this the same as IDE? 

The startup wait gets on my 
nerves. Is there any way to reduce 
it? My dip switches are set 
correctly for fast boot. The standard 
drive doesn't need the delay at all, 
so why is it there normally? I 
understand for externals, but why 
not just select delay on or off? 

Is it possible to put the drive 
aside, ie elsewhere instead of 
hanging on the left? I want to 
extend the cable etc and I have the 
bits available so there's no problem 
there. But I wonder how far the 
signals will go before data losses. 
Any idea? 

I wish to make the A500 Plus 
Into a two box system, totally 
Invalidating the guarantee, I know, 
but I hope to do this. Can I put a 
CDTV keyboard on to my 
motherboard (obviously changing 
the connectors). If I guess 
correctly, the data format should be 
the same and this will be possible. 
Optionally I would prefer an A1500 
type keyboard (nicer!), so can they 
be bought separately? 

Is it also possible to extend the 
internal disk drive cable? 

I am planning to buy a monitor. 
I have my mind set on a multisync 
for future upgrade. I see you are 
now suggesting buying a multisync 
in the magazines and am wondering 
If you have tried the Acorn one? I 
have been quoted a price of £222. I 
tried ft against the 8833Mk2 from 



Philips, and it is far better in my 
opinion. 

Which Basic-type languages 
can access the RS232 port? I want 
to use it at at least 4800 baud for a 
comms program. Which languages 
should I stay clear of? 

Robert Veal 

East Lothian 

Scotland 

The drive in your A590 is an "XT-IDE 
drive. You will want to upgrade that 
to a SCSI drive as soon as you can, 
as XT-IDE is really nasty and slow. 
You can replace the XT drive with a 
SCSI drive very simply. 

The startup delay is due to the 
A590 first checking for any SCSI 
drives attached. When it finds no 
SCSI drives, it then checks for XT 
IDE. If you replace the IDE with a 
SCSI drive it will boot up faster. 

You can extend the actual hard 
drive by a foot or so, but you can't 
extend the A590 itself, that must be 
directly connected to the side of the 
A500. 

It's possible to rewire a CDTV (or 
2000/3000) keyboard to work on an 
A500, but rememeber that both the 
power and drive lights are connected 
to the A500 keyboard, so you'll have 
to wire up something to replace 
these. Also the CTRL-AMIGA-AMIGA 
reset won't work, so you'll need to 
wire up a reset switch to the RESET 
line on the 68000 chip. Unless you 
really hate the A500 keyboard I'd 
say don't bother. 

You can extend the internal disk 
drive cable - again, probably no 
more than a foot or so to be safe. 

Any multisync that can handle 
15.75Khz horizontal sync and 50Hz 



vertical sync will work with the 
Amiga. Beware: a lot of new 
multisyncs only handle horizontal 
syncs of 30Khz and higher. JR 

NOT GOOD ENOUGH 

I have an Amiga 500 
Plus and a Citizen 
tfo. I 120D Plus, which I 

Ji^^M use t0 P rint out 
listings, letters and the occasional 
university report. To try the 
combination out I bought an issue 
of your sister magazine, Amiga 
Format, which featured a 
PageSetter 1.2 cover disk. 

Using the fonts and preferences 
options upon loading the DTP 
software and printing various 
letters, there appears to be no 
difference between draft and NLQ 
print, no matter what font or style I 
use. On the other hand, If I use the 
Workbench 2.04 Shell and send 
control characters and text to the 



printer (using the printer's internal 
fonts, I think) then the NLQ print is 
excellent. 

I obtained Citizen Print 
Manager, but this gave the same 
results, albeit much quicker. I've 
also tried setting the printer to NLQ 
with control characters and then 
using the DTP software, with no 
success. 

Is this a limitation of 
PageSetter 1.2, or am I missing 
something obvious? 

Neil Hughes 

Brookvale 

Hants 

Well, yes, you are missing 
something simple, although it's not 
all that obvious. You almost sussed 
it out yourself when you realised that 
printing from the Shell used the 
printer's internal fonts. 

continued on page 43 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Dip switch - A method employed by several devices, including hard drives 
and printers, to enable the user to make manual adjustments to the way 
the device behaves. 

Multisync monitor - A monitor which can accept its signal at a variety of 
frequencies, usually ranging from 15 to 32KHz. A multisync is useful for 
displaying signal produced by a flicker fixer or from an IBM PC VGA card. 

SCSI - Small Computer Systems Interface is the standard used for 
connecting hard drives, CD-ROM drives and tape back-up units to 
computers. 

Shell - A method of communicating with the Amiga's operating system via 
the keyboard rather than the more usual mouse and windows method of 
Workbench. The Shell is the interface which •surrounds' the Kernel, the 
central part of the operating system. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 A 1 



COMMODORE 

1085S STEREO 

MONITOR 

Including FREE lead 

ONLY £199.00 
i 1 

i 1 

[PHILIPS 8833 MKIIj 

i STEREO MONITOR i 

i 

L. 
P' 



Including Free Lead 

ONLY £189.00 




HARD DRIVES 



Open Monday to 
Saturday 9am - 6pm 
Callers and Mail 
Order welcome 
Easy parking 

A600 Now in £325. A600 Classics £340, I- ■ 
A600 HD £445, A600 HD Classics £475 



l KCS POWERBOARD 
PC Emulator 
For Amiga A500 

i 

ONLY £179.00 

|"AT-ONCE AMIGA 

I PC 286 AT EMULATOR 
FOR A500 

! ONLY £159.00 



.j 



GVP SERIES H 

1500/2000 

52Mb Quantum 
Space for 8Mb RAM 

£269.00 



GVP SERIES n 

1500/2000 

120Mb Maxtor 
Space for 8Mb RAM 

£379.00 



GVP SERIES H 

1500/2000 

120Mb Quantum 
Space for 8Mb RAM 

£405.00 



GVP SERIES II 

A500 

52Mb Quantum 

Space for 8Mb RAM 

£325.00 



GVP SERIES n 

A500 

105Mb Maxtor 

Space for 8Mb RAM 

£405.00 



GVP SERIES n 

A500 

120Mb Quantum 
Space for 8Mb RAM 

£425.00 



AMIGA ASOO FUN PACK — i 



Amiga A500 Plus, Mouse, Modulator, Manuals, Workbench, Joystick, Disk Box, 

10 Disks, Dust Cover, Dpaint m, 1Mb RAM, PLUS 13 GAMES 

Lemmings, Simpsons, Captain Planet, Safari Guns, Bubble Ghost, Tin Tin, Purple 

Saturn Day, Jumping Jackson, Hostages, Bobo, Krypton Egg, Shuffle Puck Cafe, 

ONLY £399.00 inc VAT 



KICK OFF 2 
£9.50 



A500 CARTOON CLASSICS 




IVS TRUMP FOR A500 



With space for 8Mg of RAM j 

52 MEGS £309 | 

120 MEGS £425 • 



...Only £319.00 



SOFTWARE 



HARDWARE 



■ DELUXE PAINT II £4.35 X CAD 2000 £95.00 

! AMOS + EXTRAS DISK £32.00 QUARTERBACK V5 £39.00 

1 BROADCAST T1TLER II £139.00 PRO-WRITE V3.2 £69.00 

I HOT LINKS £49.00 IMAGEMASTER £92.00 

I DIGIVIEW MEDIA STATION £109.00 PHOTON PAINT 2 £25.00 

I LATTICE C V5.10 £149.00 FINAL COPY £45.00 

■ PAGESETTER V2 £42.00 VIDEO EFFECTS 3D £99.00 

! PAGESTREAM V2.2 £125.00 DOS 2 DOS £28.00 

1 PAGESTREAM FONTS PACK £49.00 Q/BACK TOOLS £42.00 

X CAD 3000 £249.00 WORDWORTH £72.00 

CROSS DOS V5 £39.00 SUPERJAM £85.00 

SCENERY ANIMATOR £53.00 REAL 3D BEGINNERS £99.00 

TURBO PRINT PROFESSIONAL £38.00 

PEN PAL, Excellent easy to use word processor £53.00 

IMAGINE 3D V2.0 Animations ft ray-tracing £179.00 

£119.00 



I ART DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL V2.05.. 

I DIRECTORY OPUS £2995 

I VIDEO EASE, Video titling package £35.00 

I BARS + PIPES PROFESSIONAL £189.00 

! DPAINT 3 £1500 

J THE WORKS PLATINUM. Integrated package £39.00 

I IBM EMULATOR emulates a PC on the Amiga .. 
I VISIONARY Adventure creation language 



..£39.00 
..£53.00 



I WALT DISNEY ANIMATION STUDIO £54.00 

■ REAL 3D TURBO/PROFESSIONAL ..... £269.00 

! PROFESSIONAL PAGE V2.1 with tutorial video £115.00 

■ PROFESSIONAL PAGE V3.0 New Version £129.00 



; 386/20 AT Bridgeboard For 1500/2000 

I ROM V2.04 AND ECS DEN1SE NOW IN STOCK.. 

| ROM V2.04 Upgrade Kit 

■ DCTV 24 bit colour graphics , ..- 

1 WIRELESS MICROPHONE Ideal for sampling... 



. each £29.00 
..£85.00 



I GVP PC EMULATOR (for GVP A500 hard drives) 16Mhz 

I A530 40 MHz Accelerator with 52 meg hard dnve with 1 meg ram.. 



...£419.00 

£75.00 

.£195.00 



A530 40 MHz Accelerator with 120 meg hard drive with 1 meg ram.. 

I DPW TV TUNER for Philips + Commodore monitors — 

I GOLDEN GATE 386/25 Bridgeboard for 1500/2000/3000 

, TV TUNER for Philips and Commodore monitors 



£749.00 

£49.00 

£425.00 

£69.00 



PRINTERS 



! STAR LC24/200 COLOUR inc. free lead £269.00 

I STAR LC200 9 pin colour inc. free lead £189.00 

I STAR LC20 9 pin mono inc. free lead £132.00 

I CITIZEN SWIFT 24E 24 pin colour printer inc free lead £265.00 

■ CITIZEN 224 COLOUR 24 pin colour printer inc free lead £222.00 

! CITIZEN SWIFT 9 COLOUR 9 pin colour printer inc free lead £181.00 

I CANON BJ10 EX bubble jet printer inc free lead £232.00 

I STARJET SJ48 bubble jet printer inc free lead £225.00 

I HP DESKJET 500 Inkjet inc free lead £349.00 

! HP DESKJET 500 COLOUR Inkjet inc free lead £539.00 

1 CITIZEN 224 MONO 24 pin mono printer inc free lead £209.00 



AMIGA Aisoo 



MEMORY 



SUPRA RX500, 8Mb board for A500 with 1Mb.. 



..£92.00 



The A1500 inc. Philips or CBM 1084s or 5 monitor, Twin drives, Dpaint 3, 

The Works Platinum, Home Accounts, 3 Games + Joystick 

ONLY £739.00 

AMIGA A500 part exchange available - please pbone 



I 

I 

.J 



Ii)urruiiUiJJU, ui>iu uuaiu ;ui *-w»>w wccu »*.*»^ --- 
SUPRA RX500, 8Mb board for A500 with 2Mb £117.00 

I SUPRA RX500, 8Mb board for A500 with 4Mb £185.00 

I SUPRA RX500, 8Mb board for A500 with 8Mb £285.00 

I A500 512K RAM WITH CLOCK AND SWITCH £29.00 

■ A500 PLUS 1MB RAM UPGRADE £37.00 

! ROM 1.3/2.0 Sharer With Switch (Rom 1.3 £22.00) £12.00 

1 ROM 1.3/V 2.0 Sharer by Keyboard reset (Rom 1.3 £22.00) £22.00 



ACCELERATORS 



1 



I Microbotics Accelerator VXL-30, 25MHz £222.00 | 

| Microbotics Accelerator VXL-30, 40MHz £351.00 | 

j Speed Merchant Doubles Amiga Speed £149.00 j 

I GVP 68030 25MHZ WITH 1 MEG RAM £545.00 I 

I GVP 68030 40MHZ WITH 4 MEGS RAM £779.00 I 

I GVP 68030 50MHZ WTTH 4 MEGS RAM £1090.00 | 

I I 



MODEMS & FAX 



' Supra 14400 Fax modem v32 bis inc. comms software £255.00 

I Miracomm WS4000 v21, v23 modem £49.00 

I Supra 9600 v32 Fax/Modem inc. comms software £189.00 

I Supra 2400 Plus, MNP5 8r V42 Bis (speeds up to 9600) £129.00 

I Supra FAX MODEM SOFTWARE £69.00 

! Supra 2400 Plus Internal Modem for A1500/B2000 £159.00 

J Supra 14400 HST Fax Modem (Speeds up to 57000) NEW IN £499.00 



HOW TO ORDER: 

Either call our number 

below with your credit 

card details, or send 

cheque/PO or credit 

card details to our 

address. Cheques made 

payable to 
THE 16 BIT CENTRE 

Pricei subject to change without 

notification. 



All prices include VAT and Courier Service 

16 BIT CENTRE 

Units 15-17, 

Lancashire Fittings Science Village 

Claro Road, Harrogate HGl 4AF 

Tel (0423) 531822/526322 



EXTENDED WARRANTY 

AND MAINTENANCE 

CONTRACTS AVAILABLE 

ON ALL ITEMS. PLEASE 

CALL FOR FURTHER 

DETAILS 





fsBrnjUL 



continued from page 41 

PageSetter 1.2 does not use the 
printer's internal fonts. Its print-outs 
are basically screen dumps' - 
graphics print-outs in other words, 
copying the pixels from the screen 
and printing them at the screen's 
resolution, which is about 65-75 dots 
per inch depending on what monitor 
you are using. This system means 
that you can use many more fonts 
than are available inside the printer, 
and also that you can print pictures 
of course. 

The type of fonts PageSetter 1.2 
uses, Amiga screen or 'bitmapped' 
fonts, are displayed at screen 
resolution, so the printed output is 
low resolution. 

To get higher quality results you 
need to use a word processor or 
desktop publishing program that 
supports 'scalable' or 'outline' 
typefaces like Compugraphic or 
Adobe Type 1. These will be 
displayed at screen resolution, but 
printed at the highest resolution the 
printer is capable of. The down side 
of scalable typefaces is that they can 
eat up memory very quickly, and they 
can take a long time to print. 

PageSetter 1.2 is an old and 
really quite poor DTP program; even 
with a laser printer attached it would 
be impossible to get high quality 
results from it. I think you'll be better 
off with a word processor like 
ProWrlte or Wordworth. JW 

MAC DRIVE 

HI have an Amiga 500 
computer (Kickstart 
1.3). I have the 
opportunity to 
purchase an internal 40Mb SCSI 
hard drive from an Apple Macintosh 
computer. Would It be possible to 
connect this drive to my Amiga 
externally? Presumably I would 
need some kind of box, a SCSI 
interface and a power supply. 

Mark Adams 

Great Dunmow 

Essex 

A standard Macintosh SCSI drive 
should work fine on the Amiga with a 
SCSI interface. Supra and Dataflyer 
produce hard drive interfaces which 
can use such drives on the Amiga 
500. /our best bet would be to get a 
second-hand Commodore A590, and 
replace the 20Mb drive in this with 
the 40Mb, as the A590 controller is 
probably the best currently available 
for the Amiga 500. JR 

HOLA! 

I have a RocGen Plus 
genlock and it 
doesn't work with my 
WB1.2 Amiga 500. 
The drives lock when the genlock Is 
connected to the RGB port and I get 




ACCELERATION ON THE CHEAP 



H 



I would like to buy a 16MHz 68000 or 68010 and replace my 
existing 68000 chip at 7.14MHz with It. Would this work? 

Lots of people 



No. It won't. Your Amiga is clocked at 7.14Mhz for a very good reason. 7.14, 
when multiplied by 4 is 28MHz, which is the PAL display clock frequency. The 
reason your Amiga is so suited to video applications such as genlocking is 
because the entire system clocks on multiples of 7.14MHz. If you replace 
your 7.14MHz 68000 chip (which is in fact an 8Mhz 68000 chip, running at 
7.14MHz) with a lOMhz, 12 or even 16MHz 68000 you will notice no 
difference whatsoever as the chip will still be clocked at 7.14MHz. The 
68010 chip at 7.14MHz is slightly faster than the 68000 chip at 7.14MHz, 
which is why it is a cheap option for expansion. 75 



no picture from the genlock's 
SCART output to the Amiga 
monitor. If I connect the Amiga's 
mono output to the monitor I still 
get... nothing. When I connect the 
genlock it seems normal and the 
power LED goes on, but the Amiga 
doesn't work at all. 

I saw the genlock working fine 
on the A600 in the computer shop, 
so what do you think the problem 
is? Should I change the 1.2 ROM In 
my Amiga? 

Jose das Neves Filipe 

Alpiara 

Portugal 

This sounds as if the genlock and 
Amiga are together overloading the 
Amiga's power supply, (which is 
possible with some older units) with 
the result that the Amiga doesn't get 
any current, and so can't run. If your 
Amiga works OK without the RocGen 
connected then this is almost 
certainly the problem. 

The solution is to obtain an 
external power supply for the RocGen 
Plus - an option which is 
recommended in the RocGen 
manual. You may be able to get one 
from your dealer, or it might be 
possible to find a substitute which 
will do the job, though I wouldn't 
recommend this unless you are 
certain it will have the correct voltage 
and current, as well as connector. 

If you want to make sure, find a 
dealer who will let you test your 
Amiga and genlock with an external 
power supply - then you can be 
certain that it is a power supply 
problem before you commit yourself. 
GW 

DRIVERS ARE A BIND 

W a "% I recently bought a 
l/\ J GVP Impact Series II 
l^^^^J hard disk drive for my 
ftfl ^U A500 Plus and while I 
am very pleased with the speed 
programs load, I am disappointed 
with the documentation supplied. I 
attempted to carry out the 
automatic installation procedure, 
but encountered the message 
"Can't find gvpscsistrl. device". 
Some blind fiddling with the 



Binddriver menu selection got me to 
the stage of asking whether or not 
to copy some files on to the drive. 
After copying the Workbench, I left 
the program. I would be grateful if 
you can give me some further 
advice in the following areas: 

a) How to partition the drive. 

b) How to install a virus killer to 
check the drive during boot up. 

c) Explain what Binddriver is. 

d) How to back up the drive. 

e) How to install programs to the 
hard drive. 

f) How to install Workbench. 

K Donnely 
Kilburn 
London 

Let me say first off that I have not 
personally installed a GVP drive on 
an A500 Plus - but I have heard of 
these problems. They were caused 
when Commodore released the A500 
Plus and caught us all with our 
metaphorical trousers down. 

a) The best place to get technical 
support, and someone with whom to 
go through this procedure, is from 
Silica Distribution on 081 309 1111. 
It probably supplied the drive in the 
first place and should be able to 
offer full technical support. 

b) Installing a suitable virus killer is a 
two stage process. First you have to 
copy it on to the hard drive, and 
second you have to activate it in the 



startup-sequence. The simplest (if 
not the neatest method) is to copy it 
into the special WBStartup drawer. 
For a better method consult the 
AmigaDOS column in Amiga Shopper 
11. This contains a detailed 
discussion on the methods of 
automatically starting programs from 
a boot sequence. A good background 
virus killer is VirusX, but there are 
plenty to choose from - consult your 
local PD library for the latest. 

c) BindDrivers (I assume that's what 
GVP is referring to) is a special 
program which mounts certain types 
of hard disks and older RAM 
expansions. If you need BindDrivers, 
there will be a drawer on the 
Workbench called "Expansion". If 
this drawer is missing or empty (no 
icons) then BindDrivers is not used. 

d) You can back up your hard drive in 
a number of different ways - but by 
far the simplest method is to use a 
good commercial back-up utility such 
as Quarterback. However, a perfectly 
good back-up utility is supplied with 
Workbench 2 anyway. HDBackup may 
not be as friendly as Quarterback, 
but at least it's free - you'll find it in 
the Tools drawer on the Extras2. 
disk. 

e) This is a difficult question to 
answer because different programs 
have different requirements. 
Generally speaking, most commercial 
programs are supplied with 
installation utilities or can be 
dragged into a new drawer from the 
Workbench. It is possible to 
construct a semi-automatic install 
routine from AmigaDOS and if a 
couple of readers write in, I will 
include it in a future issue. 

f) Workbench 2.04 is supplied on 
three disks. The main disk contains 
all you need to start the machine, 
the Extras disk has lots of little 
goodies, and the fonts disk should 
be obvious. When you installed your 
hard drive you only copied a minimal 
Workbench set-up and you will have 
missed a lot of the better stuff. I find 

continued on page 46 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Bitplane/bltmap - A bltplane is an area of memory where every binary bit 
corresponds to a pixel on the screen. One bitplane represents a 
monochrome image, several can be overlayed (a bitmap) to represent a 
colour image. 

Font - The group of letters, numbers and special characters that comprise 
one variation of typeface, eg: 12pt Times, 12pt Times Bold, 12pt Times 
Italic. 

Genlock - A way of slaving one video source (eg Amiga) to another (eg video 
tape) in order to synchronise their signals to allow stable wipes, mixes 
and other effects including overlay between the two sources. 

Virus - A small program that can lie hidden in memory or on a disk, 

duplicating itself on to any disks inserted in the machine, and generally 
causing havoc. There are many virus killers available in the public domain 
designed to deal with this menace. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



Award winning innovative products from 







Cards 

GVP Series 2 HD 

■ Up to 8Mb SIMM RAM on-board 

■ Supports external SCSI devices 
■FaaaSTROM4.0 

■14MHz SCSI controller 

52QMB 0MB .£279 105QMB0MB £479 
52QMB 2MB £339 105QMB2MB £539 
52QMB 4MB .£399 105QMB4MB £599 
52QMB8MB £469 105QMB 8MB £749 

Nexus Hard Card 




■ Up to 8MB RAM on-board 



Bare £199 

52QMB 0MB £279 
52QMB 2MB £339 
52QMB 4MB £399 
52QMB 8MB £469 



105QMB0MB£479 
105QMB2MB£539 
105QMB4MB£599 
105QMB8MB£749 



Bare SCSI Hard Drive 

52 Quantum ..£199 105 Quantum £299 

(Suitable for GVP G-Force, GVP HD or Nexus HCI 
Other sizes of HD available, please call 

RAM Expansion 

■ Aries A1 500 /A2000 RAM 



2MB 


...£129 6MB £209 


4MB 


...£169 8MB £249 


Macii 





"This really is the best emula- 
tor we've seen for the Amiga. It 
behaves just as if you really 
were using a Mac" 

Amiga Format Sept 1992 

AMax-ll Plus 

■ Amiga 1500 and above 
■Runs Mac software 

■ Runs System 7 

■ Full support for all SCSI Mac 
peripherals and the ability to read Mac 
disks in your drives 

■ 68020/68030 compatible 
■AppleTalk emulation 

■ Can use Amiga ECS 

■ Easy to install 



24-Bit Colour 

OpalVision 

■24-bit graphic card 

■ 16.8 million colours available 

• Operates in all standard Amiga 
resolutions 

■ VLSI Microcode graphics co-processor 

■ Double buffered 24-bit and 15-bit 
animation is available in all resolutions 

■ 'Palatte-mapped' design updates screen 
colours in real-time. Fade pictures in and 
out and change their palettes 

■Equipped with 1.5MB of display RAM 

■ Auto-config for NTSC or PAL 

■ Available for all Amigas 



Software included 

OpalPaint 

■ 24-bit painting and image processing 

OpalPresents 

■ Presentation program 

■ Control OpalVision images, Amiga 
graphics and live video 

■ Includes fades, effects etc. 

■ Many more features 

King of Karate 

■ 24-bit computer game 

■ Exciting karate competition 

• Demonstrates OpalVision capabilities 



Optical Hard Drivi 



OpalVision . 



£899 



AMax-ll Plus 

(Mac ROM chips required) 



£299 



More information available 

OpalVision Roaster chip available soon 

Auto ROM Sharer 

■ Kick-off is the latest Amiga add-on from 

Power 

■ One of the most advanced kickstart 

ROM sharers available 

■ A clever design on a small reliable 
board 

- Fits A500 , A500+, A1500 

■ Kickstart ROM can be selected from the 
keyboard 

■ No messing about with switches 

■ No "CIA adaptor" or other trailing wires 

■ Jumper to select which ROM boots on 
switches 

■ Compatible with old Amiga board 
revisions 

• Simple internal fitting* 

" Kick-off requires the lid to be removed trom tho Amiga. 
This may invalidate your warranty. 

ROM Share £17.95 

ROM Share inc. kickstart v2.04 £55 

ROM Share inc. kickstartvl.3 £39 

ROM Share for A600 £29 




NX 



■ Manufactured by Power Computing 

■ 128MB on one optical disk 

• Read and write optical disks 

■ 40ms running speed 

■ Built-in power supply 

■ High power cooling fan 

■ 25-way and 50-way SCSI ports 

■ Thru'port built-in 
-SCSI ID switch 

■ Compatible with major SCSI controllers 

128MB optical drive (Internal) £729 

128MB optical drive (External) £999 

128MB 3.5" optical disk £39.95 each 

SCSI controller card 

for A1 500 / A2000 £1 99 

(Compatible with Amiga, PC, and Mac. A SCSI 
controller is required on the Amiga and PC) 

Commodore A1SOO 

■ 1MB of RAM 

■ Two 3.5 internal disk drives 

• Fully expandable, accepting all A2000 
peripherals 

■ Keyboard and mouse 

■ Software included 

The Works Platinum Edition 
Delux Paint III 
Home Accounts 
Puzznic game 
Toki game 
Elf game 



A1500 



Accelerator 



£599 



OVP G-Forca 

1 68030 accelerator board 
i 68882 Maths co-processor 
i DMA SCSI controller on-board 
'68000 fall-back mode 
i Only CPU slot is used 

■ Internal and external SCSI connector 

i Converts to hard card with Hard Drive 
mount kit 

■ 32-bit RAM as standard 



25MHz 1MB RAM 


£579 


40MHz4MBRAM 


£879 


50MHz4MBRAM 


£1249 


Hard drive mount kit 


£35 



Distributor for Power Computing in Italy. D.R.R. SRL 00142. Roma. Via Duccio Di Buoninsegna Tel (061 5193481/482 Fax 5040666 
Power Computing. France. 15 Bid Voltiare 75011. Paris. France. Tel (1) 43386206 (6 lines) Fax (1) 43380028 



Power Computing Ltd ■ Tel 0234 843388 



Scanners 

"If your in the market for a 
hand scanner then forget the 
rest and get Powerscan" 
!\miga Format July 1992 

Power Scanner v2.0 




1 100-400 DPI scanning resolutions 
'64 grayscales 
'Thru'port for printer 
'Award winning editing, image manipu- 
lation & scanning software 



3 ower Scanner v2.0 

3 ower Scanner Colour 



£99 

£239 



Epson GT-6000 




•600 DPI Colour flatbed scanner 
'24-bit colour 
■A4 reading area 
■Software included 

Epson GT-6000 



£999 



Epson GT-8000 

'800 DPI colour flatbed scanner 
'24-bit colour 
'A4 reading area 
'Software included 
Amazing scan quality 



Epson GT-8000 



..£1199 



Upgrade Offer 

f you consider your scanner system to 
De inferior to the Power Scanner, we will 
lappily upgrade your software and inter- 
ace. (Power Scanner is compatible with 
•nost scanning heads) 



Jpgrade 



£49.95 



fho Amiga can only display 16 grayscales 



Floppy Drives 
'This drive contains more gad- 
gets than Batman's utility belt" 

Amiga Computing Feb1992 

PC88OB Power Drive 




■Award winning drive manufactured by 
Power Computing 
■Super slim design 

■ Anti-click (Cures that annoying click) 
■Virus blocker (Prevents viruses) 

• Built-in backup hardware 

PC880B with Blitz Amiga £65 

PC880B with Blitz & XCopy £90 

PC880B (Cyclone compatible)* £70 

PC880B in black case £65 

•This drive is only available to regislered owners ol XCopy 
Professional. You must provide proof of purchase of XCopy 
Professional 

Power Drives 

PC880E Economy drive £49.95 

PC881 A500 Internal drive £40.00 

PC882 A2000 Internal drive £45.00 

Dual Drive 

■ Two high quality disk drives built into 
one compact unit 

■ Same features as PC880B 

Dual drive £125 

Drive Accessories 

A500 Internal anti-click board £9.95 

Maxell multi-colour disks (10) £9.95 

Floppy disks bulk supplied £POA 

Blitz Amiga 

■ Backup disks at lightning speeds 

■ Stops all external drives from clicking 

■ Contains anti-virus from being written 
into the bootblocker 

Blitz Amiga £20 

RAM Expansion 

Blizzard Turbo 

■A500/A500+ 

■ Expand up to 8MB (OK installed) 

■ Memory and 68000 CPU run at 14.28MHz 

■ Fast 68000 processor installed on-board 
■Fully auto-configuring 

■ Optical 512K shadow RAM on extra 
memory bank for shadowing the operat- 
ing system out of ROM or from disk 

Blizzard Turbo £169 



RAMs continued 
A600 Memory Cards 




1MB RAM with clock £49.95 

1MB RAM without clock £45.00 



PC501+ RAM Card 

Our RAM board is designed especially 
for the A500+ computer and comes with 
1MB of RAM on board to expand your 
memory to 2MB of chip RAM. Plug-in and 
go operation (Fits into the trapdoor) 



PC501+ RAM card 



£39.95 



8MB for any A500 

• Plugs into side slot, fully auto config, full 
thru'port. Expand 2MB-8MB 

2MB £109 4MB £169 8MB £289 
1 x4ZIP chips £14.95 

2MB for any A500 

■ Economy 2MB RAM externally cased 
- 16-chip {1 x 1 DIP) 
■No thru'port 



2MB RAM 



£79 



1.5MB RAM Board 

■ Fully supports 1MB of chip RAM 

■ Fully compatible with Fatter Agnus 

(Kickstart 13 and above, not compatible with A50O+I 

{Your Amiga needs to be opened, this may effect your warranty) 



1.5MB RAM board 



£75 



1MB with Thru'port 

■ Expand your A500's memory up to a 
total of 2MB without disposing of your 
existing 512K upgrade 

■Works with 1MB of Chip RAM 

I5I2K HAM must be 4 chip typo or not exceeding 9cm in length! 
(Your Amiga needs to be opened, this may effect your Warrantyl 



1MB with thru'port. 



£45 



A500 RAM Card 

■ 51 2K RAM expansion with clock & free 
software (A500+ compatible) 

512K RAM (4 chip) £29 

512KRAM without clock £24 

512K RAM (16 chip) with clock £24 

512KRAM (16 chip) without clock £19 



Power Shop, 86 Walton Road, East Molesey, Surrey KT8 ODL. 081 941 9073 




Award Winning Manufacturers 

Power products come with 

full technical support 



Order Form 



Name 



Address 






Postcode 



Tel. No. 



-J 



Description 



Credit C 


rd No. 


□in 




MM MM 





Expiry Date 



Signature 



I enclose cheque/PO for 



J 



Tel 0234 843388 
Fax 0234 840234 

Power Computing Ltd 

Unit 8 Railton Road 

Woburn Road Ind. Estate 

Kempston Bedford 

MK42 7PN 







established 1985 

Specifications & prices 

subject to change with out notice 

All trademarks acknowledged 

VAT &dolivorv Included 



Mm. 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Accelerator board - A device which either includes a central processor like 
the Amiga's, or a more advanced one in the same range, but operating at 
a higher speed. An accelerator is useful for calculation-intensive 
applications, such as 3D rendering. 

Chip RAM - The area of the Amiga's memory directly accessible by the 
custom graphics and sound chips. Originally a maximum of 512K, newer 
machines fitted with the fatter Agnus graphics chip can access 1Mb, 
enabling smoother animations and more screens to be displayed at 
once. The new A600 comes with an Agnus chip capable of addressing 
2Mb of Chip RAM. 

Modem - A device which converts computer signals into a format suitable for 
transmission along a phone line. Likewise, it will convert incoming 
signals into a form the computer can recognise. External modems will 
work with any computer, although it is possible to buy Amiga-specific 
cards to plug into the A15O0 and A2000, keeping the serial port free. 



continued from page 43 

the simplest solution is as follows: 

Boot your machine from hard 
disk. Double click on the Shell icon. 
Insert the Workbench disk in the 
internal drive. Enter the following at 
the prompt (l.SYS>): 

COPY DF0:#? TO SYS: ALL 

Press [Return] or [Enter] when you 
finish typing. (Don't worry if you 
make a mistake. It's almost 
impossible to get this command to 
overwrite something it shouldn't). 
When the operation completes - 
you'll see a lot of information scroll 
up the window - insert the Extras 
disk and enter the command detailed 
above again. 

Finally, repeat the last step for 
the Fonts disk. 

You can, of course, perform that 
entire operation from the Workbench 
- but in practice, AmigaDOS is faster 
and keeps you more informed. Do 
not under any circumstances use 
this technique with any disks other 
than those supplied by Commodore. 
MS 

CHIP RAM HASSLE 

HI recently carried out 
the modifications on 
my Amiga to allow the 
0.5Mb in the trapdoor 
to be configured as Chip RAM. All 
was well until I Inserted the hard 
drive. When booting, the process 
stops and displays the default 
Workbench screen with no icons 
and a requester with the writing not 
visible (le white). It would seem the 
hard drive needs Fast mem, but It 
has Its own located at $200000 to 
$600000. 1 know the trap door 
expansion is located from ScOOOOO 
to $c80000. 1 want 1Mb Chip RAM. 
A Fung 
Wlgan 
Greater Manchester 

I'm suprised that your Protar hard 
drive doesn't seem to like 1Mb of 




Chip RAM. This is either a very 
serious design fault in the drive, or a 
problem caused by the following... 

When you partition your hard 
drive you can tell the drive what type 
of memory to use for the drive 
buffers. Usually it is set so that any 
type of memory will do, but if your 
drive is set up so it requires Fast 
RAM, then your hard drive may fail if 
you only have 1Mb of Chip RAM. (The 
RAM on the hard drive card is not 
available to the system until after the 
hard disk is initialised, so that can't 
be used). If you can, revert to 0.5Mb 
Chip/0.5Mb Fast and try 
repartitioning the drive, check to 
make sure the buffer RAM is set to 
Chip or Any (rather than Fast). Then 
try the conversion again. Other than 
that complain again to Protar. JR 

WHICH ACCELERATOR 

Please could you help 
me with some 
information as 
regards which 
accelerator would be best and most 
compatible with my system? 

I am not really satisfied with the 
standard 7.14MHz CPU, and would 
like an accelerator which would 
speed up every aspect of the Amiga. 
This includes Wsfa. DPaint IV, 
Wordworth. and some games that I 
have which are designed to take 
account of a quicker CPU. 

I am confused by the vast 
range. A 14MHz accelerator does 
not seem very attractive at all. 
What I really want Is the best all 
round reliable accelerator, say 
28MHz or faster, that is easy to fit 
and set up. I would also like to be 
able to switch back to 68000 
mode. 

I read somewhere that In order 
for an accelerator to work, there 
must be a super fast hard drive 
controller fitted. Will I have a 
problem with this? 

I have also read that 
accelerators require 32-bit RAM and 
maths co-processors. Is this correct 



for the uses I have in mind and a 
few I haven't got round to yet? 

Philip Ebbans 

Walsall 

W Midlands 

I would suggest a 68030 based 
accelerator card, such as the wide 
range of GVP expansions. These are 
easy to fit and install, and provide 
you with a 68000 fall back mode for 
compatibility with badly written 
software. 

In answer to your other 
questions, you do not need to get a 
super fast hard disk controller, but 
you will not notice much of a speed 
increase in hard disk operations with 
your new accelerator installed. If you 
are in doubt, check with the hard 
disk manufacturer. 

Although you do not specifically 
need 32-bit RAM, it certainly makes 
a difference with a 32-bit chip such 
as the 68030. Without it, the 68030 
chip has to access your current RAM, 
which is 16-bit. To read a 32-bit 
chunk of memory, it would have to 
read it in two halves - thus 
effectively doing twice the work. This 
is not to say that you will not notice 
a considerable increase in speed - 
you will. Most 68030 cards available 
these days either come with some 
32-bit RAM, or sockets so that you 
can fit some yourself (or, preferably, 
your dealer can). 32-bit RAM will help 
you to make the most of the 
68030's available power. 

As far as the floating point co- 
processor (FPU) goes, this is very 
application specific. You mention 
Wsfa if you are likely to perform 
considerable amounts of Wsfa work, 
then it's something you ought to 
seriously consider. The FPU performs 
the most common floating point 
operations in hardware, and is a lot 
quicker at doing them than the 
680x0 chip. There are two FPUs 
available for the 68000 series of 
chips, the 68881 and the 68882. 
Usually, with 68030 boards, they 
have 68882 chips - as these are 
faster and more powerful than their 
predecessors. TS 

VANISHING CLOCK 

HWhen I fitted the 
super card Ami II, I 
had to connect two 
wires to the 40-pln 
8520 CIA chip (U301). After 
carefully reassembling the B2000 
on start up, no matter what 
software I use it states "unable to 
find battery backed-up clock". I 
have disconnected the super card 
with only the same result. Other 
than the clock, all software loads as 
before. Please help as it is very 
annoying having to reset the clock 
each time I load software. 

NJ Devereaux 
Neasdon 



It is possible that the clock on your 
motherboard has failed, but it is 
more likely that it is 'confused'. Try 
the command SETCLOCK RESET 
from the CLI before trying to set the 
time. Failing that, the public domain 
program ClockDoctor should sort you 
out. JR 

L OVER'S T IFF 

W~i ^ At our school we have 
i\ I a scanner and several 

l^^^J RM Nimbus 
L™«^™^ computers which we 
use to scan images In up to 256 
colours. These are then saved In 
TIFF format. I would like to be able 
to transfer these images but I need 
a piece of software that will convert 
the TIFF images to standard IFF 
format. I have spoken to several PD 
libraries and have bought both 
MessySID II and Graphic 
Interchange as they advised. Fine, 
but the pictures won't load on 
DPaint IV. Graphic Interchange 
came with lots of utilities to convert 
images to and from GIF format, but 
there aren't any utilities on the disk 
which can handle TIFF format. 
Please help. 

Wayne Bosworth 

Rothwell 

Northants 

I'm afraid I'm the bearer of bad 
news, Wayne. GIF format is totally 
different to TIFF, so I'm afraid the 
disk that you bought isn't going to 
help you at all. What you need is a 
program written to specifically handle 
TIFF format images. 

Unfortunately, as far as I'm 
aware there are no utilities of this 
type available through the PD 
libraries. As a result, the only way to 
achieve what you require is to either 
try and convert the TIFF format files 
to GIF format using a PC public 
domain conversion program (I'm 
quite sure there are a couple 
available) or dig deep into your 
pockets and splash out on a 
commercial image conversion utility 
such as ASDG's Art Department 
Professional or RasterLink from 
Active Circuits Inc. 

Of the two products that I've 
mentioned, you're probably better off 
with RasterLink, simply because 
ADPro does not support TIFF as 
standard (you'll have to buy the TIFF 
loader separately). 

RasterLink also handles Mac 
PICT format files, Targa, Sun 
Rasterfile, Sculpt Direct/RAW RGB 
and Turbo Silver format. 
Unfortunately, I'm not sure whether 
RasterLink is still available as a 
product in its own right now that the 
Amiga Centre Scotland has started 
to bundle it with its 24-bit Harlequin 
frame buffer board. It's always worth 
a try though - ACS can be contacted 
on 031 557 4242. JH 



A A AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



mm. 




TTLVRGB 

I would like to 
connect my Amiga 
500 Plus to the TTL 
RGB input of my 
Commodore 1081 monitor, but I'm 
unsure of some of the connections 
between the 23-pin RGB connector 
of the Amiga and the 8-pin DIN 
connector on the monitor. The TTL 
RGB, intensity and sync are 
obvious, but pin 1 of the DIN plug is 
shown as 'status' in the monitor 
handbook and I'm not sure where to 
connect this to. 

The reason I wish to do this, by 
the way, is because I use the RGB 
input on the 1081 with a TV tuner. 
John Ireland 
Faversham 
Kent 

I'm sorry, John, but this seems like a 
very odd thing to do! Why not buy a 
SCART switcher to switch between 
your two SCART inputs and have the 
best of both worlds? Connecting your 
Amiga output to the TTL socket on 
the 1081 would mean you could only 
have 16 colours on screen, which 
would be a shame when you 
consider the Amiga's capabilities. A 
number of companies advertising in 
Amiga Shopper do these for around 
£20, not that much more than you'd 
pay for a made-up lead. GW 

BT DRIVES 

H After messing around 
with some of BT's 
surplus equipment in 
DT - a Torch 68000 
hard disk - I pulled out a ma6sive 
double height 5.25" hard disk. A-ha, 
that looks like an MFM edge 
connector on the back. I'll connect 
up the lead for the XT Internal 
floppy. Now I'll power it up. Yep, the 
whole table starts to shake. The 
problem is, how do I use it, as my 
knowledge of MS-DOS is well 
limited? I have a dual-drive non- 
twisted cable but then it goes on 
about drive numbers. Help! 

PS: the drive is made by Rodime 
Ltd. It's a series RD 200 and has 
one illegal address at 192 head 4. 
There's also a strange edge 
connector to the left of the MFM 
connector - it's 10 pins up - 10 
pins down and like the MFM has a 
polarity slot two "pins" from the 
right. There Is a terminating resistor 
pack behind the MFM connector. 
Will it work with Vortex's Golden 
Gate? One last point, on the PCB, 
there are only two 16-bit sockets 
with the four XT sockets. Is it 
possible to solder extra sockets 
Into the PCB for the other two slots 
as there are holes and solder pads? 
Guy C Sandford 
Hastings 
East Sussex 




You have two major problems here. 
Firstly, the MFM hard drive you have 
needs to be connected to a hard disk 
controller, not to the floppy controller 
you have at the moment. With an 
Amiga 2000, a Commodore 
Bridgeboard and a standard XT MFM 
hard disk controller card will enable 
you to link this up; on an Amiga 500 
Cumana does an interface that is 
suitable. To be totally honest though 
I'd suggest you get rid of the drive: 
MFM drives really are more trouble 
than they are worth, and I'd not 
recommend anyone try and use one 
unless they've got lots of patience. 
JR 

PIN MONEY 

I am planning to buy a 
colour printer and 
would be most 
grateful if you could 
advise me whether to get a 9-pin or 
24-pin. and also which make. 

EM Butcher 
Norwich 

You wouldn't believe how often I am 
asked this question. The answer is 
simple: how much money do you 
want to spend? 

If you can afford a 24-pin printer, 
then buy one, because the output 
will be of a higher quality than from a 
9-pin printer, which is why they cost 
more. Unless, of course, you are not 
worried about quality, in which case 
go for a cheap 9-pin printer. 

Which make? That's like asking 
which make of television should you 
buy. The idea is you have a dam 
good look around and buy the one 
you like the best within your budget. 
The two 24-pin models that appear 
to be battling it out for top spot at 
the moment are the Star LC24-200 
and the Citizen Swift 24e. JW 



UNUYIMIIV 



ANIMATION EXPANSION 

I am a very keen 
beginner animator but 
I am finding that I run 
out of memory very 
quickly. I enquired about a 1.5Mb 
upgrade In a local computer shop 
and I was told that the motherboard 
has to be cut to fit it. Is this true, 
as I do not want to carry out any 
modifications myself and fitting 
costs would be astronomical? Also, 
could you tell me what new chips 
and alterations my computer would 
need to allow me to have 1Mb of 
Chip RAM. 

Nigel Helliwell 

Cullompton 

Devon 

The best way to upgrade the memory 
on your Amiga is first to convert to 
1Mb of Chip RAM. This will require a 
new Agnus chip at around £50, plus 
around £25 for fitting. Once you have 
1Mb of Chip RAM (which is far better 



KINDA MS-DOS 



B 



If I save my Klndwords files as ASCII format on my 
AmlgaDOS partition, is there any way I can get them Into 
MS-DOS format and move them to the MS-DOS partition on 
my hard disk? 

Patrick Skelton 
York 



This is actually very simple to do. All you need is a PC transfer program such 
as CrossDOS, D0S-2-D0S or my preferred weapon, MessyDOS. You'll be 
able to get hold of MessyDOS from any good PD library and once installed, 
moving a file is a simple as copying one. MessyDOS accesses PC disks in 
any floppy drive. In AmigaDOS an example could be: 

COPY dhO: Filename to MSH: 

where MSH: is the drive name of the MessyDOS device. Now drop into PC 
mode and call the file back from A: thus: 

COPY A: C: 



MS 




for animation), you can add up to 
8Mb of Fast RAM to the expansion 
port on the left side of your Amiga. 
Cortex does an excellent upgrade to 
take up to 8Mb of RAM, but the best 
value way to expand your memory is 
to buy a hard drive that takes 
expansion memory (such as the 
Commodore A590 or the GVP 
Series II). JR 

MODEM COMPATIBILITY 
I've been given a 
brand new 

"Stradcom" half card 
modem. Is there any 
way of getting It to run on my 
Amiga? I've got the phone line with 
the new style sockets and NComm. 
The modem unit has 1 edge 
connnector, 1 phone out and 2 
phone in lines (one for Europe). The 
specs are: dialling capability - pulse 
and tone, modem data type - serial, 
binary, asynchronous 300BPS and 
1200BPS. Protocols - CCITT V21 
originate/answer 200BPS full 
duplex, CCITT V22 originate/ 
answer 1200 BPS full duplex, CCITT 
V25 auto answering. Serial port 
data - serial, binary asynchronous, 
7 or 8 data bits, 1 or 2 stop bits, 
odd, even or no parity. Port 
addresses and interrupts coml - 
3f8 3ffH IRQ4, com2 - 2f8 2ffH 
IRQ3, com3 - 3e8 3efH IRQ 4, 
com4 - 2e8 2efH IRQ3. 

Steven Harrison 
Winsford 
Cheshire 

First of all, let me thank you for all 
the detailed information. It makes 
this sort of problem much easier to 
solve. Unfortunately there is no way 
you will be able to run this modem 
on your Amiga, it's designed for a 
PC. It's a 'card' modem. PCs have 
'slots' inside, the modem fits in one 
of these slots. The Amiga doesn't 



have any PC compatible slots so it 
won't work. 

Your best bet is to try and sell it 
and buy an 'external' modem and a 
cable. The modem you have is pretty 
slow but you might be able to get 
£40-50 for it, if you're lucky. PH 

TOWER POWER 

HI Intend to buy the 
Vortex Golden Gate 
386SX PC/AT 
emulator which 
comes as standard with an AT IDE 
hard disk controller. I would 
therefore like to add an IDE hard 
disk to the system for the sole use 
of the PC emulator (It will operate a 
lot faster than my Seagate which Is 
used by the Amiga side). The 
problem Is, the three drive bays 
Inside my A1500 are already used 
and therefore I have nowhere to 
mount the second hard drive. Do 
you know whether there Is a 
conversion kit available similar to 
HIQ Ltd's HIQ Tower system for the 
A500 that will allow me to strip the 
A1500 out of Its box and Install it 
inside a Tower system casing.? 

Tien That Ton 
London 

To be perfectly honest, there isn't a 
lot of call for such a conversion kit 
simply because the A1500 is already 
so expandable. You have however 
found one problem that many A1500 
(and 2000) power users eventually 
stumble upon - the lack of drive bay 
space. I'm having exactly the same 
problem at the moment - I had 
hoped to install a tape streamer 
inside my B2000 but all the drive 
bays inside my machine are full too. 
All I can suggest is to try and source 
a casing for the drive and then have 
it connected to the Golden Gate via a 

continued on pog« 50 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



PHOENIX 



SALES 0532 311932 

Our friendly, highly trained sales 
team will ensure that your order is 
dealt with efficiently and with the 
minimum of fuss. 

— At the time of 
placing your 
order we will 
advise you of 
anticipated 
delivery time 
and answer 
■•*' any other 
<r queries you 
"""■s^ may have 

regarding your 
purchase. All 
major credit cards accepted. 



TECHNICAL 0532 319061 

The Phoenix product helpline 
ensures that all our customers 
benefit from the highest level of 
after sales technical support. 

We also offer 
advice to help you 
in choosing 
exactly the right 
product for your 
requirements 
thus eliminating 
the possibility of 
an unwanted or 
unnecessary 
purchase 



DESPATCH 0532 310798 

Once you have made the decision 
to purchase from Phoenix your 
order will be dispatched promptly 
and without fuss. 

Using one of the 

) countries leading 

courier services 

ensures that your 

goods arrive on 

time, intact and 

pin the same 

condition they 



A 600 NEW PACKS 



"THE WILD, THE WEIRD & THE WICKED' 

1 Mb A 600 as standard and includes tine excellent value 
Software titles: Deluxe Paint III • Formula One Gfand Prix • 
Putty 'Pushover «*«»«»«»». <*.,•> ■ 

...only £339.99! 

A 600 2Mb M*Ma*Mai. £379.99 

'EPIC-LANGUAGE PACK' 

1 Mb A 600 as standard and includes the excellent value 
Software titles: Deluxe Paint III 'Trivial Pursuit* Epic • Myth • 

"only £484.99! 

A 600 2Mb fed****-* £524.99 



MONITORS 



PHILIPS 8833Mk II ..ME? £194.99 

Colour Stereo Monitor now including 'Lotus Turbo 
Challenge', and 1 years on-site warranty. 

COMMODORE 1085 SDI £216.99 

COMMODORE 1084 SDI £199.99 

MONITOR ACCESSORIES- 

14" Dust covers £4.99 

14" Tilt & Swivel stand £13.99 

Anti-Glare filter screen £19.99 

A4 Copy Holder £12.99 



All monitors are supplied with a FREE 
cable tor connection to your Amiga. 




HARD DRIVES A500 



The stand-alone A 600 is compact, semi 
portable, fully featured and can be 
purchased in the following configurations: 

a 600 £274.99 

a eoo hd tm\mm £429.99 

A 600 2Mb £314.99 

A 600 HD 2Mb £469.99 



A 600 RAM EXPANSION 



FEATURES INCLUDE: - Trapdoor installation 
Will not invalidate your warranty • Battery backed 
real time clock • Long life lithium cell • 
Enable/disable facility • Full installation 
instructions • Made in U.K. • Complete with famous 
Phoenix 2 year warranty. 

Phoenix PA 601-populated-IMb £44.99 

Phoenix PA 601-unpopulated-0Mb...£24.99 

Phoenix A 600 ROM Sharer £29.99 

Keyboard swiwhable! 



PHOENIX AMIGA 
Power Pack 



When purchasing any Amiga you can also buy our 
unbelievable value PHOENIX POWER PACK, which 
includes over £100 of quality software and 
accessories. Probably the best bundle around, just 
look at what you get! 



Man Utd Europe • Kick Oft 2 • Captive 
Rick Dange 

Fully Microswitched Joystick 

50 Capacity 3.5" Disk Box 

8mm Mouse mat »10 Phoenix Branded 

Disks with Labels 



Phoenix Power Pack., 



£39.99 



GVP IMPACT SERIES II Hard Drives, the 
fastest Hard Drive/Controller for the Amiga. 

Features Game Switch, external SCISI port, 
FAAASTROM SCISI Driver, GVP's custom VLSI 
chip and internal RAM expansion up to 8 meg! 
Units use high specification fast-access 
QUANTUM Hard Drives coming with 2 yr. guarantee. 

A500-HD8+ 52 Mb (Unpopulated) £329.99 

A5O0-HD8+ 120 Mb (Unpopulated) £424.99 

A500-HD8+ 240 Mb (Unpopulated) £689.99 



ROCTEC 



PRICE CRASH!!!! 

Roctec "Rochard" hard drives now at 
unbelievably low prices!! 

ROCTEC 40 MB £259.99 

ROCTEC 60 MB £294.99 

ROCTEC 80 MB £329.99 

ROCTEC 120 MB £364.99 

Featuring Quantum/Connor drives-very fast access 
times-(19ms or better) • expand up to 8 Mb using 
1 Mb Simms only • 1 year guarantee • slimline 
design ideally colour matched to the A500. 

ROCTEC (controlletr Only) £1 64.99 

Very similar in style and appearance to the GVP 
HD8+ but unpopulated and without a hard drive so 
you can fit your own. Please specify IDE orSCISI. 

EXTRA MEMOR V Only £25.99 when bought with drivel 



HARD DRIVES 
1 500/2000 



Series II Hard Disk Controller/RAM card....£1 14.99 
Series II 52 Mb Hard Disk and RAM card..£269.99 
Series I1 120 Mb Hard Disk and RAM card...£399,99 

Series II 240 Mb Hard Disk and RAM card £639.99 

EXTRA MEMORY Only £25.99 when boughi with drivel 



ACCELERATORS A500 



GVP Combination Acceukators & Hard Drams-The 
ultimate expansion product for the Amiga 500! 

A530 Combi 40MHz + 52Mb Hard Drive_.....£659.99 
A530 Combi 40MHz f 120Mb Hard Drive...£757.99 

A530 Combi 40MHz 1 240Mb Hard Drive £979.99 

A530 68882 Co-Processor. £204.99 

GVP G-Force 030-25MHz + 1Mb £545.99 

GVP G-Force (OMOMHz + 4Mb £784.99 

GVP G-Force 03O-5OMHz + 4Mb £1099.99 



ACCELERATORS 
1500/2000 



AMIGA 1500 



2.04 Workbench Includes: Deluxe Paint 3, Platinum 
Works, Home Accounts, Toki, Puzznic, x Elf, Amiga 
Format Book and Joystick r*cWi nA 

AMIGA 1500 MB L3J3.$) 



AMIGA 1500 + 1084 SDI 



This SPECIAL OFFER combines both the 
A1500 (as shown above) and the legendary 
Commodore 1084 SDI Monitor. p-ion t\f\ 
AMIGA 1500+1084 SDI t I£.3.\JV 

Limited Stocks Only! 

GVP PC-286 16MHz £239.99 

Vortex A Tonce Plus 286 iigmhz) £214.99 

KCS Powerboard (with dos «.oi) £199.99 

KCS Powerboard £184.99 

KCS adaptor for 1500/2000... MB £59.99 



EMULATORS A 500 



ACCELERATOR 
RAM Modules 



1Mb Simm-32 Bit 60 Nanoseconds £65.99 

4Mb Simm-32 Bit 60 Nanoseconds £1 82.99 



PHOENIX A500 Plus 

2 Meg RAM Upgrade Modules 



I A PHOENIX RAM 
module can expand 
your chip RAM up to 
2 Mb by using the 
trapdoor expansion 
port. Extra RAM is 
necessary to unleash 
I the incredible graphics 
capabilities of your Amiga. All our boards carry a 
full 2 year no quibble replacement guarantee. It's 
never been cheaper to upgrade! 

1 Mb Fully populated __ _ _ _ 
RAM board.... hWi'MW £34.99 
1 Mb unpopulated RAM board £16.99 




PRINTERS 



STAR- 

LC-100 Colour CEZB £159.99 

9 PIN colour printer with paper parking, eight fonts 
and electronic DIP switches. 

LC24-100 cms £189.99 

24 PIN with compressed data mode. 16 K buffer and 

10 letter quality fonts,(with Star printer driver only). 

lc-20 £134.99 

LC-200 Colour £1 95.99 

LC24-20 £199.99 

LC24-200 Mono £219.99 

LC24-200 Colour £268.99 

XB24-200 Colour £379.99 

SJ48 Bubblejet £229.99 

Star printers come with one year warranty. 
CITIZEN- 

Swift 240 Colour CSMST £279.99 

Swift 240 Mono I 7R VH £259.99 

Swift 200 Colour imv s £219.99 

Swift 9 Colour Hi'MMiM £179.99 

224 mono ■■■...■...■. .■£214.99 

224 Colour UMMUSi £229.99 

Swift 24e Colour IM'MWJ £269.99 

Citizen printers come with 2 year warranty. 
HEWLETT PACKARD- 

Deskjet 500 Fffwmnm £339.99 

Deskjet-500 Colour £559.99 

HP printers come with 3 year warranty. 

HP black ink cartridge £24.99 

HP colour ink cartridge £29.99 

AUTO SHEET FEEDERS- 
STAR LC20 £57.99 

STAR LC200 £59.99 

STAR LC24-200 £62.99 

STAR LC24-20 £62.99 

STAR SJ48 £49.99 

PHOENIX PRINTER PACK- 

Supplied with ALL printers containing 1.8m std. 

printer cable, printer ribbons/cartridge and 250 

sheets of paper absolutely FREE. 

PRINTER ACCESSORIES- 

We have a large range of high quality printer 

accessories for all the printers we sell including: 

dust covers from £2.99 • Ink cartridges from 

£13.99 • Mono ribbons from £3.50 • Colour 

ribbons from £7.99 • Printer stands from £7.99 

CALL 0532-311932 FOR MORE DETAILS! 



AMIGA CUSTOM CHIPS 

Kickslart 2.04 ROM £34.99 

Kickslart 1.3 ROM... £27.99 Fatter Agnus 8372A..E34.99 
NEW Super Denise.C34.99 CIA 8520A £9.99 

MEMORY CHIPS 

4 Mb x 9 1-701 Simm....E9999 1 Mb 1 4 (-80) Zip -£34.99 

1 Mb x 9 1-80) Simm...£27.99 256k x 4 (-80) Zip '£29.99 

256k x 9 (-80) Simm...£12.99 1 Mb x 1 DRAM £3.49 

2S6k x 4 DRAM £3.49 'This price is for 1 Mb of RAM 

These chips cover practically every popular memory 
expansion or Hard Drive system on the market for the 
Amiga ie. GVP, SUPRA. MICROBOTICS, COMMODORE 

RING OUR TECHNICAL HELPLINE IF YOU NEED AOVICE 



MEMORY EXPANSION 



SUPRA 500RX the ultimate in Fast Ram 
expansion units. I 'Uses 256x4 lips) 

8 Mb pop to 1 Mb* £99.99 

8 Mb pop to 2 Mb* £124.99 

8 Mb pop to 2 Mb £149.99 

8 Mb pop to 4 Mb £209.99 

8 Mb pop to 8 Mb £309.99 



DISK DRIVES 



All drives feature super slim design, enable- 
disable switch, thru port and come with a 1 year 
replacement guarantee! 

Phoenix Deluxe Drive £47.99 

Roctec Roclite IMSB £57.99 

This famous drive has now been upgraded to 
include Anticlick and Virus Checker 
Replacement A 500 Internal Drive. ..£3 9. 99 
Disk head cleaner £3.99 

The first col. digrtiser for under £100 from ROMBO. 

vidi-amiga 12 MB £89.99 

ROCGEN Plus £129.99 

ROCKEY BY ROCTEC-Chroma key unit 

Embed live video in graphics! 

Phoenix Price £269.99 



PHOENIX will he at Ihi Future Eitertalnnent Show Niv 5-8th Earls Court. Be sure to come and see us there aad take advantage ot sane increllhle shew bargains! 



ACCESSORIES 



Zy-Fi Stereo speakers £37.99 

Superb sound and excellent dynamics. These two- 
way stereo speakers are an Amiga standard- 
Excellent companions on any gaming soiree! 

Control Centre £34.99 

Heavy duty construction.rubber edging, perfect 

colour match, makes an ideal workstation for the 

A500/A600 

DATA SWrrCHES-^5 pin type) 

2 way £1 5.99 

3 way £1 7.99 

4 way £19.99 

STORAGE: 

90 Capacity BANX £11.99 

150 Capacity POSSO £16.99 

Disk Box 10 Cap £1.99 

Disk Box 25 Cap £2.99 

Disk Box 50 Cap £4.99 

Disk Box 100 Cap £6.99 

Disk Box 120 Cap £7.99 



"Thanks once again for 

your efficient service and 

patient advice." 

S. Ward~ Norfolk 



PHOENIX PRODUCTS 



Mouse/Joystick Switch £1 3.99 

Don't damage your Amiga's portslThis device saves 
wear and tear makes switchover FAST, and does NOT 
require power unlike many others. 

Computer/Video Scart Switch.... £19.99 

Flip between Video/computer signals at the push of a button. 



AMIGA MUSIC 



Attention all you music lovers! Phoenix have 
put together an unbeatable music deal for you this 
summer. 



When purchasing either a 

Phoenix Stereo Sampler or Pro Midi 2 Interlace 

Please Nolo: this is a limited offer only while slocks last' 



Stereo Sampler tmvimm £29.99 

Combines ease of use with state of the art analogue to 
digital conversion technology. (inc. FREE sample editing 
software ♦audio lead) 

Pro-Midi 2 Interface £24.99 

This fully featured professional quality midi interface is 
very flexible giving semi-patch bay facilities. It has five 
ports in, out thru and two switchable outAhru. (inc. FREE 
midi lead) 

GVP Digital Sound Studio ...£54.99 

High quality sound sampler for all Amiga 

Computers 

Amiga Music Made Easy-Only from Phoenix! 



SOFTWARE 



WORD PROCESSING /DTP 

Kindwords3 £36.99 

Interword £29.99 

Final Copy 2 . HTWH £66.99 

Professional Page 3 / TRW £129.99 

Saxon Publisher /77jTff £189.99 

Pagestream vZ2 -....£126.99 

Pagestream Font pack 1 £44.99 

Page Setter 2 £46.99 

Pen Pal 1.4 £57.99 

Prowrite v3.X £57.99 

Quickwrite £36.99 

Transwrite £29.99 

Wordworth £79.99 

Hot Links £52.99 

INTEGRATED PACKAGES 

Gold Disc Office £59.99 



TRAIL BLAZERS-WHAT'S NEW IN OCTOBER 1992! 

In this month's "TRAIL BLAZERS" section we spotlight some of the best 
newer products and peripherals currently available for the Amiga. 



R'OCTEC ROCLITE CD ROM DRIVE-A570 

This famous super slim drive has now This essential add-on has finally 
been upgraded to include Anti-click and arrived, suitable for A500/A500+, A570. 
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mm — 

continued from page 47 

ribbon cable that comes out of the 
back of the machine. OK, it'll look 
untidy, but that's the only way of 
getting around the problem short of 
making some form of chassis for the 
drive inside the machine. JH 

ANIM REPLAY 

In Amiga Shopper 16 
you answered a query 
/^ I on how to run DPalnt 
JimmJ IV animations 
without having to load DPalnt first 
by using the Player supplied with 
the package. 

Can the same be done with 
DPalnt lit? If so, I cannot find the 
Player mentioned in the answer on 
my DPalnt III animations disk. 

CGIen 

Enfield 

Middlesex 

Look again Mr Glen, and you'll find a 
program called Play. If you don't I'd 
question the authenticity of your 
disk, as it's certainly present on my 
DPaint III Animation disk. Run this 
program and you can load and play 
animations as you require. 

Alternatively, there are a number 
of PD players such as ShowAnim and 
View which any good PD library 
should have. GW 

TERROR OF BLOCK 880 

H After reading your 
answer to Professor 
Craf's disk drive 
problem (issue 15 
page 70-71) I contacted 316 
Supplies from which I bought my 
Roctec drive only a month 
previously and told it that it was 
faulty. I have been having similar 
problems. The company was very 
efficient and Immediately sent out a 
replacement and some blank disks 
to cover my postage. Now after only 
a few hours use it has also given me 
a write error in block 880 and the 
disk will not validate. Have I 
another faulty drive? Can I repair my 
disks? If It Is a power supply 
problem will I make things worse by 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



ANIM - A method of storing animation frames developed by Spartafilm, 
whereby only the changes between successive frames are stored, thus 
saving significant amounts of space. 

ECS - Extended Chip Set is the name given to the new versions of the 
Amiga's custom chips which handle graphics and sound. 

Library - Collections of pre-written programs that can be called from 
applications programs, saving each programmer from having to write 
routines to perform common tasks. Some are in ROM; some are loaded 
from disk as they are needed. 

Printer driver - A program that sits inbetween any applications program 
producing output and the printer. It converts any codes describing text 
and graphics format into a form suitable for a specific printer. 

RAM - Random Access Memory, so called because any part of it can be 
accessed immediately, rather than having to search through from the 
start of memory to the point of interest. RAM is used to hold programs 
while they are being executed and temporary data. The contents of RAM 
are lost when the power is switched off. 

SIMM - Single Inline Memory Module, a collection of RAM chips in a 
package. 



adding RAM? I recovered my files 
with Last Hope and it seems track 
40 is totally unreadable. 

Garry Hemming 

Clifton 

Nottingham 

If your drive does the same thing 
with any floppy disk (to rule out a 
faulty batch of diskettes), then either 
your drive is faulty or your Amiga has 
a fault. Check out the drive on a 
friend's machine if you can, and if 
the drive is definitely faulty, send it 
back. JR 

COLUMNS IN THE NEWS 

The main use for my 
Amiga 1500 Plus Is 
production of a 
weekly newsletter, 
approximately 50 copies. The 
printer is a Canon BJ-300 bubble 
jet, using Canon's own driver. 

The newssheet Is two columns, 
but Platinum Works! does not 
support columns. Can you 
recommend a word processor that 




H 



68010 V 68000 



Is It worth buying a 68010 10MHz for £15 Instead of paying 
£45 for a Turbo 68000? 

BJorn Tidal 
Sweden 



The 68010 is a drop in replacement for the 68000 chip. Even if you get the 
10MHz chip, it will still run at 7.14MHz, as that is the clock speed of the 
Amiga itself. The 68010 chip at 7.14MHz is slightly faster than the 68000 
chip, especially in mathematical operations such as multiply and divide. 
Turbo 68000 expansions work by doubling the clock speed of the 68000 
chip. This, in theory, doubles the speed of your Amiga, but in reality this is 
not quite the case. If you want a general across the board speed increase, 
it's probably better to go for the Turbo 68000 chip. If you can, wait until you 
can afford a 68020 chip. TS 



does support multiple columns? I 
have tried many PD word 
processors, but to no avail - Uedlt 
looked promising, but doesn't seem 
to work properly on the Plus. 

I know a DTP package will give 
multiple columns (I have 
PageSetter), but because this type 
of output is bitmapped it takes ages 
to print lots of copies. The BJ-300 
prints 150 characters per second In 
LQ mode, so I want to use a 
character-based program for speed 
of printing. I don't need graphics or 
anything fancy, but support for 
embedded printer control sequences 
would be nice. 

I have just started ARexx 
programming, since I recently 
discovered (in your magazine) that I 
have a copy that came with 
Workbench 2.04. Thanks for the 
helpful manual, Commodore! Can 
you recommend a book that will 
help me discover ARexx? 

Kevin Ball 

Batley 

West Yorkshire 

Multiple columns and support for 
embedded printer control codes 
spells one word: Protext. I 
recommend most strongly that you 
go for the latest version 5, rather 
than the much older and much 
cheaper version 4. 

Kevin, have you considered 
making one master copy of your 
newssheet and then photocopying it? 
Nowadays, many High Street output 
bureaux are charging only about 3p 
per A4 sheet for 100 copies or more 
(Alphagraphics, for example - look in 
your local Yellow Pages), and I think 
you'll find that this works out 
cheaper than paper and ink for the 



bubble jet. And then you could use 
PageSetter^. 

To learn all about ARexx I'd 
recommend Using ARexx on the 
Amiga, published by Abacus. Also, 
look out for the ARexx series starting 
this month in Amiga Shopper on 
page 88. JW 

16MHZ 68000? 

Hln your August 200 
Tips special, you say 
it is possible to 
upgrade the 
processor by simply replacing the 
68000 chip with an 8 or 10MHz 
68010. 

Is it possible to use a 16MHz 
68000 in the machine, as I have 
seen one available? Would this be 
faster than a 10MHz 68010? 

Alan Francis 

Dunfermline 

Fife 

Yes, a 16MHz 68000 would be 
faster than a 10MHz 68010 - but 
no, unfortunately you cannot perform 
this upgrade. The Amiga has a 
7.14MHz clock for the processor 
chip, and no matter what clock 
speed the chip you add, it will still 
clock at 7.14MHz. If you did put the 
16MHz 68000 chip in, your machine 
would work fine - but at exactly the 
same speed. The 68010 chip is 
slightly faster than a 68000 chip at 
the same speed, which is why it 
works to drop one in as a straight 
replacement. 

If you want to add a faster 
68000 chip, you have to buy a 
special Turbo 68000 card, which has 
the necessary electronics on board 
to provide the faster clock speed and 
interface this to the rest of the 
Amiga. TS 

MODEM BASICS 

HWMi^Hi Always on the look 
. ^„^ j out for a bargain, 

I today I picked up a 
J^^^^J Supra Modem 2400 
and KCom 2 from a boot sale for 
just £35 complete with boxes and 
wrappers unopened. 

Getting home, I read through all 
of your Comms articles hoping to be 
educated on the subject, but found 
the basics somewhat lacking. Can 
you please answer me the following: 

a) I see you only discuss two pieces 
of software, both presumably PD, 
and no mention of KumaComm 2. 
Does this stack up well against the 
other two? 

b) You very kindly mention several 
bulletin boards in your articles - 
what about printing a list once in a 
while? It would be useful if you 
mentioned the cost of joining. 

c) You talk about passwords, 
logging on etc, as though everyone 
is aware of what you are talking 
about. Row about an idiots' guide, 



50 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



_J35™£. 



starting at the very beginning (or 
have I missed this copy)? 

d) I have a hard drive so will have 
this attached to my Amiga when I 
get around to calling up my first 
bulletin board. Is there any danger 
anyone could "get into" my hard 
drive and can I catch a virus on it? 

e) What on earth could an Idiot like 
me upload? As you say, it Is all very 
well downloading all the goodies 
you want, but as I am not exactly 
"Amiga literate" what can I offer In 
return? 

f) In your last article, you mentioned 
how you would go about setting up 
your own bulletin board. As you may 
have gathered, this Is the last thing 
on my mind, but what is to stop an 
enterprising reader with lots to offer 
using an 0898 telephone number, 
which would then earn him (or her) 
some revenue to pay back the 
outlay? 

Peter Squires 

Wickford 

Essex 

a) The two packages you mention 
[NComm and JRComm) are both 
excellent shareware comms 
packages which are being continually 
developed and improved. 
KumaComm is looking a bit dated 
these days and the shareware 
packages have the comms market 
pretty much sewn up. As you have 
KumaComm I would use that for 
now; it will have the facilities 
beginners need. At a later date you 
could get hold of a copy of NComm 
and compare the two to see which 
one suits you most. 

b) A list of bulletin boards would be 
nice although we are a bit limited 
space-wise. I will try and give details 
of a few more though and hopefully 
we'll have space for a more complete 
list in the future. Very few boards 
charge for access and those that do 
are usually optional. Take a look at 
this month's comms article for a 
short list of Amiga boards. 

c) An idiots' guide will be in next 
month's issue. It will feature a step 
by step guide to registering on a BBS 
and some hints and tips on 
downloading and other aspects of 
comms. 

d) Noone can get at your hard drive 
if you are dialing them - not a 
chance. Viruses are a little more 
dangerous but you will only get them 
by downloading infected software 
and then running it. The majority of 
BBS sysops check the software 
available for download, but your best 
bet is to get an up-to-date virus killer 
and check all software before you run 
it. Viruses cannot come down the 
phone line on their own. 

e) The best thing to upload is 
something you find useful. If you 
download a file from one board, and 
you find it really useful, go to a board 



that doesn't have it and upload it. If 
you try and visit a few boards 
regularly then you'll soon have a 
large collection of interesting 
programs to upload to boards that 
don't have them. 

f) There isn't really anything stopping 
someone from doing that. Indeed, 
there are a couple of PC-based 
boards which do run on 0898 
numbers where you can download 
shareware. The problem is that there 
are so many BBSs that the software 
is probably available on a free board 
somewhere anyway. Some boards 
charge a small subscription but the 
30-50p a minute charge for 0898 
numbers is far too much. PH 

SPECTRUM DRIVE 

HI have a 3.5" external 
floppy drive that I 
obtained to run with a 
Spectrum and an MGT 
Plus D interface. Now that I have 
upgraded to an Amiga I wish to 
utilise this drive as my second drive 
(DF1:). Could I obtain a cable and 
connector to connect this drive to 
my Amiga? If so, from where? And if 
possible could you advise me on the 
jumper settings on the floppy drive 
circuit board, to make it 
recogniseable by the Amiga. 

Anthony Simpkin 

Birches Head 

Stoke on Trent 

I doubt it. Although it's possible to 
convert an MGT 3.5" drive to run on 
the Amiga, it's really not worth the 
effort. I'd suggest you get a cheap 
external drive from one of the many 
suppliers who advertise in Amiga 
Shopper and sell your MGT drive and 
interface to another Spectrum owner. 
JR 

SPEED DEMON 

Ha) Can 1Mb x 9-bit 
SIMMs In a hard drive 
be used as Chip 
memory after the 
infamous motherboard adaptation? 

b) Is GVP (or anyone else) planning 
to offer upgrades to the new GVP 
A530 processor/hard disk 
combination to existing hard drive 
owners? 

c) How does 32-bit memory co-exist 
with 16-bit RAM? Can you select 
which tasks run in what memory or 
is this handled automatically by the 
system? 

d) Is there a decent, cheap IFF 
slideshow program available? The 
PD program ShowWIz Is absolutely 
perfect but ft refuses to work with 
my hard disk. InstantSlldeShow on 
the Deluxe Paint IV freebies disk is 
OK, but it doesn't let you control 
wipes or save scripts and Deluxe 
Video 3 is a bit over the top for Just 
showing slides. 

e) Is there a program available 



which can report on and do anything 
about hard disk fragmentation? 

f) How can I find out what calls are 
supported by the ARP library, as I'd 
like to use its file requester within 
my own programs. 

g) Is there a program available that 
will let me create or modify fonts 
larger than Fed s 16x16 pixel self- 
imposed limit? 

h) In Amiga Shopper 15 you quoted 
the price of Progressive Peripherals' 
68040 accelerator for the A500 as 
£725. Was this a printing mistake 
or is it for real? How compatible Is 
the 68040 with existing Amiga 
software? Will software optimised 
for the '020 and '030 work on it? 
i) Will the ECS and an accelerator 
allow the memory inside my A500 
to be expanded beyond 9Mb? 
j) Is there a driver available for the 
Star SJ-48 Inkjet? The EpsonQ driver 
works well enough, but it doesn't 
allow you to print at the printer's 
highest resolution of 360x360 dpi. 
Andrew Watson 
Currle 
Midlothian 

a) No. I'm afraid the motherboard 
modification you refer to only works 
with 512K RAM expansions 
connected to the Amiga via the 
trapdoor connector. 

b) Having spoken to the people at 
Silica Systems, they assure me that 
the idea is being looked into. As 
soon as I know more, I will pass the 
information on. 

c) All 32-bit RAM installed inside an 
Amiga is handled by the processor 
accelerator, so it's kept separate 
from the Amiga's standard 16-bit 
RAM. 

d) To be perfectly honest, I haven't 
yet seen a decent PD slideshow 
program. Your best bet is to treat 
yourself to a copy of TVShow, a 
brilliant commercial slideshow 
generator which is available from HB 
Marketing (« 0753 686000) for just 
£39.95. 

e) Sure is. What you need is a copy 
of QuarterBack Tools which is 
available, once again, from HB 
Marketing on the number above. 

f) I suspect that you've simply copied 
the ARP library from another disk. 
What you need is to get your hands 
on the official ARP distribution files 
which can be found within the Fish 
collection of public domain disks. 
These files include everything you 
need to know to be able to access 
and use all the routines within the 
ARP library including a couple of 
demos (one of which shows you how 
to use the file requester). The most 
helpful people I have found for Fish 
disk enquires are at George 
Thompson Services which can be 
contacted on « 0707 664654. 

g) Quite a few alternative font editors 
are available although my personal 




CLOCK GETS 
MY BACK UP 

I reset the machine 
after running 
Superbase 
Personal and now 
my battery backed-up clock in 
the A501 has stopped working. A 
message "Battery backed-up 
clock not found appears". I have 
checked the battery connections 
and so on, and everything seems 
to be OK. 

JB Palmer 

Warblington 

Havant 

it is possible the clock chip or Ni- 
Cad has failed leaving the 
machine without a clock. You can 
check the battery voltage with a 
high-impedance voltmeter - it 
should read 3.6V DC. It is more 
likely, however, that the clock has 
got "confused" in some way. You 
can reset it in software using the 
following Shell command: 

SETCLOCK RESET 
MS 



favourite is Calligrapher which is 
available, once again, from HB 
Marketing. Calligrapher is an 
absolutely brilliant piece of software 
that will even allow you to edit colour 
fonts. 

h) The price of the Progressive 
Peripherals' 68040 processor card 
isn't a printing mistake! 

Having played around with one 
already, I can guarantee you that it 
really does fly (even the base model 
is several times faster than a 25MHz 
A3000). 

The 68040 is basically just a 
more powerful version of the '030 
(which is in turn a more powerful 
version of the '020), so any software 
written specially for this processor 
will work with the '040 (only a lot 
faster!). 

i) The Enhanced Chip Set alone won't 
enable your Amiga to access more 
than the usual 10Mb on an A500 
Plus, but a processor card will. 

I've already seen several adverts 
within the American press for 
processor accelerators which can 
address up to 129Mb of RAM 
(although 32Mb is more usual), 
j) Following on from Canon and 
Citizen's lead, a little birdie tells me 
that Star has now produced a range 
of printer drivers for its printers 
including the SJ-48. 

You can obtain these free of 
charge from Star on 0494 471111. 
JH 

continued on page 54 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



dMJiiei adie • seasonal baie • seasonal sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal 




The centre of tec 

WTS Electronics Ltd, Chaul End Lane, Lutc 




Amiga 600 Pack 



UK specification 
•1MB system RAM 

• Mouse 

• Full workbench disks, manuals & leads 

• Free game included in pack 

• Deluxe Paint III 

• Two Python joysticks 

• 100 capacity lockable disk box £295 



Amiqa 600 HD Pack 



• As above 

• Plus integral 20MB hard drive £395 




Amiga 1500/2000 Pack 



• 1 MB System RAM • Workbench 2.04 • Mouse 

• Twin Floppy • Works (Platinum addition) • 
Deluxe Paint III • Home Accounts • Alf game • 
Toki game • Puzznic game • Two Python joy- 
sticks • 1 00 capacity lockable disk box 

• Amiga 1 500/2000 Pack £489 

• Al 500/2000 with 52MB HD £759 

• With 2MB Chip Memory add £129 



Amiqa 3000 



• 1MB Fast Memory • 1 MB Chip Memory • 
25MHz Processor • 52MB HD • 100 capacity 

diSkb0X £1399 



Philips 8833 MKII Monitor 



Star Printers' 



Hard Drives 




• 14 inch high resolution colour 
display 

• High clarity stereo sound output 

• Full RGB and composite inputs 

• Free 1 .5 metre long RGB cable 

• Full UK warranty 

• 3 Free games 

• Philips 8833 MKII Monitor £199 



1 When purchased with 
an Amiga 



£189 



Emulators/Accelerators 




Star LC20 Mono 

• 1 80 characters per second. NLQ mode, 
multi Font, 9 pin head £144 

Star LC200 Colour 

• 225 characters per second, NLQ mode, 
multi font, 9 pin head £204 

Star LC24-200 Mono 

• 222 characters per second, LQ mode, 

1 fonts, 24 pin head £229 

Star LC24-200 Colour 
•222 characters per second, LQ mode, 

1 fonts, 24 pin head £294 

Star AJ48 Bubble Jet 

• Quality comparable with a laser printer, 
very quiet and portable. Mains and bat 
tery powered, adaptor supplied £249 




• GVP A500/A2000 

• High quality, high reliability 

• Easily expandable memory capability 
using low power simms 

• Complete with installation software and 
power supply 

• A500 52MB HD £344 

• A500 52MB & 2MB Fast Memory £384 
•A500 52MB & 4MB Fast Memory £424 

New 

• A500 52MB with Combo Accelerator 
40MHz £694 

• A1 500/2000 52MB HD £278 

• A1 500/2000 52MB & 2MB RAM £319 
•A1 500/2000 52MB & 4MB RAM £359 




1 The professionals and hobbyist tools 

KCS Powerboard Emulator £179 

GVP 286 Emulator £189 

AT Once Emulator £176 

G Force 68030 25MHz & 1 MB £579 

G Force 68030 40MHz & 2MB £844 

G Force 68030 50MHz & 4M8 £1179 

G Force 68030 28MHz A3000 £1669 

G Force 68030 33MHz A2000 £1669 



Workstations 




1 Economically sound 

1 Facilitates up to three external floppy 

drives 

1 Made in the UK 
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1 Keep your desk neat and tidy 
1 Supplied complete and assembled with 

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'A500 Workstation £36 

1 A600 Workstation £36 

1 Swivel and tilt monitor stand 
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Peripherals 



Scanners 



Music 




• 1 00 Capacity lockable disk box £4.99 

• Squick mouse £13.99 

• Mouse mat £2.50 

• TDK high quality DSD (1 0) disks £9.99 

• 1 000 colour disk labels £12 

• LC20 printer ribbon £3.49 

• Jet Fighter joystick £13.99 

• Apache joystick £6.99 

• Python joystick £9.99 

• Zipstick joystick £14.99 

• A500/A500+ 

Internal replacement disk £39 

• Vast range of leads for many 
applications - Please call 




' Allows image processing in a useful and 

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' Comes complete with operation 

manual and the latest version of 

processing software 
' One of the fastest growing applications 

for home and professional users 
1 High specification coupled with cost 

effective pricing 

1 Power Hand Scanner 

1 64 greyscales 100-400 DPI 

1 Thru'port to printer 

1 Fully compatible with Delux Paint 4, etc. 

' Power Hand Scanner £96.99 




1 Highest quality stereo sound 

sampling 
1 Compatible with A500, 

A1 500/2000, A3000 

1 GVP Digital Sound Studio 



£49 



• Screen Beat Speaker System £25 

(Adds amplified stereo sound to the Amiga) 



1 Megamix Master 
1 Stereo Master 



£37 
£34 



mmsatmmemmmimmmmmmm 






anal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sale • Seasonal Sa 



1NICAL EXeELLENeE 

, BEDS, LU4 8EZ TEL (0582) 491949 (6 LINES) K 





Pro Agnus 2MB 



• Provides a full 2MB of Chip Memory for the 
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built in England • Supplied with 8375 Obese 
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the form of low power Zips • Allows the pro- 
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addressable memory space from 9MB to 
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£139 
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Memory Expansions 



A500 Pro-RAM 0.5 Meg. Upgrade 

1 Chip memory compatible • British made 
■ Without clock £16 • With clock £19 

A500 Pro-RAM 1.5MB Memory Upgrade 

• Gives a full 2MB of internal memory £79 

A500+ 1MB Memory upgrade £39 

Supra RX500 (2MB-8MB) 

• 2MB £138 • 4MB £194 • 8MB £299 

A600 1MB Memory upgrade £49 

10MB Memory upgrade A500 £408 



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Allows the addition of peripherals 
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> A500 Power supply unit £44.95 
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Top notch specification 

Anti-click 

Long moulded cable 
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• Cumana external drive 

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+ 1 00 capacity disk box 

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+ 100 disk box + 20 blank disks 



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• Utilise hundreds of PD Bulletin Boards 

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• Supra 2400 £84 
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'Workbench 2.04 Kit 

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continued (roM page SI 

GOOFY DPAINT 

I seem to be 
encountering some 
compatibility 
problems with .anim 
files between DPalnt IV and Disney 
Animation Studio. 

For example, if I make up a 
small animation of six cells in 
Disney, save them to my hard drive, 
then load the same cells into DPalnt 
all is fine. But when I save the six 
frames from DPalnt as an anim and 
reload them into Disney ail of a 
sudden I have eight cells, not six, 
with the first two cells being 
repeated at the end as cells seven 
and eight. 

Strangely though, if I load the 
animation back to DPalnt there are 
only six cells! 

I've tried running DPalnt in 
NTSC Instead of PAL but this makes 
no difference at all. I've also tried 
saving the files from DPaint In 
expanded form, instead of the usual 
compressed format, but I still get 
the extra two cells in Disney. 

I would be very grateful if you 
could solve this small problem as I 
would like to use the two 
programs in conjunction with one 
another. 

SN Semley 
Barnsley 
SYorks 

There's a simple reason for your 
troubles... DPaint produces 
animations in a double-buffered, 
looping format, and to do this it 
needs to save the first two cells 
again so that the animation will loop 
smoothly. 

As far as I know, there's nothing 
you can do about this in DPaint when 
you save the anim. 

However, a straightforward 
solution would just be to delete the 
extra two cells after you've loaded 
the animation into Disney Animation 
Studio. 

I'm curious as to why are you 
using both programs? Surely DPaint 
IV would be sufficient for all your 
needs? GW 



■ M;W.]fl:ll^J|J[JiM;M.1?|:imj|5Fc1 

BBS - A Bulletin Board System is an electronic method of exchanging 

messages between large numbers of people. The name comes from the 
American College bulletin board (the cork and drawing pins type) which is 
a traditional meeting and trading place. 

Bit - A binary digit, with a possible value of zero or one. It is the smallest 
unit of memory. 

CD-ROM - Compact Disc Read Only Memory is the latest technology in 

storage devices. A CD can hold over 650Mb of data, compared to around 
100Mb for a hard disk and 880K for a floppy disk. The big disadvantage 
is that users cannot store information on a CD, only retrieve it, but this 
doesn't stop CD from being a potentially revolutionary medium. 

PostScript - A powerful mathematical language used to describe graphics 
and text images to compatible printers. Because it does not rely on a 
pixel system, objects so described can be scaled and rotated without 
distortion or loss of detail. 

Zorro - The interface standard used by the larger Amigas to enable them to 
accept plug-in cards for expansion. 



IHE MAR* 



THE MARK OF ZORRO 

I am thinking of 
upgrading my system 
to an A1500. In your 
last issue (17) you 
said that the machine was to be 
discontinued and replaced with two 
new machines using Zorro III 
expansion slots. My questions are 
about these slots. 

a) The A1500 has Zorro II slots - 
can you use cards for Zorro III slots 
in the A1500? 

b) The A500 has a Zorro i slot - can 
cards for this slot be used in an 
A1500? 

Sean Kelly Onchan 
Isle of Man 

The Amiga 500 doesn't really have a 
Zorro I slot, it has an edge 
connector, which is more or less the 
same thing, except it is an 'edge' 
rather than a slot. 

Zorro II was developed as the 
replacement in the Amiga 2000 to 
provide a better and more capable 
card-based system. 

Zorro III is a 32-bit replacement 
for Zorro II. Unlike Zorro l/ll which 
are incompatible, any Zorro II card 
will work in a Zorro III slot (like those 
in the Amiga 3000). Zorro III can 



FAX OF LIFE 

HI have recently acquired an Amstrad FX9600AT fax machine 
which has a scanner output. At the time the machine was 
put on to the market (1990) no interface electronics were 
available from Amstrad, and the company did not intend to 
manufacture any. 

Do you know whether a suitable Interface can be obtained? 

Paul Clarke 
Upper Denby 
Huddersfield 

I'm pretty sure an FX9600AT interface hasn't been built for the PC yet, let 
alone the Amiga, and I wouldn't recommend you hold your breath waiting for 
one to arrive. JW 



access far greater areas of memory 
and transfer data far faster than the 
older Zorro II cards. 

So where does this leave those 
users with older Zorro II slots? Well, 
so far I have only heard of one Zorro 
III specific card, a 64Mb RAM card. 
So if you can live with less than 
64Mb of RAM in your Amiga, then 
don't worry about Zorro II. JR 

POSTSCRIPT PROBS 

^^~y"* After reading your 
I article in issue 17 
I ff^ I about the Star Laser 
I^^^J Printer 411 StarScript, 
I noted you were able to print 
(download) text in a font other than 
the 35 PostScript fonts resident in 
the printer. 

I have a Star Laser Printer 811 
StarScript, and I am unable to 
perform this simple task in 
PostScript mode, and have to print 
out in HP LaserJet emulation, 
although I have all the necessary 
software to download from 
Professional Page 1.3, which came 
with Gold Disk's Publisher series of 
extra fonts. 

The download program works 
OK. The print requester works OK. 
The printing status window works 
OK. But the printer refuses to print 
anything, telling me that the job is 
'undefined', or I get a message 
Fatal MV Ram Error' and I have to 
reset the printer and go into HP 
LaserJet emulation to print. The 
same thing happens when I use 
PageStream. 

What I cannot understand is 
why it will not print any text from 
Professional Draw 2.0 In PostScript, 
as i was under the impression that 
all elements in this program are of a 
structured form and Professional 
Draw does not regard type in any 
other way. To print from 
Professional Draw in HP LaserJet 



seems to take for ever, and I would 
like to use my printer's PostScript 
features most of the time. After all, 
that is what I paid the extra cash 
for. 

Do you know of any reason, 
technical or otherwise, why I cannot 
achieve this? 

I have contacted Star, who 
completely baffled me with science, 
so I remain none the wiser. Likewise 
I contacted Gold Disk's agents in 
the UK, who referred me to Gold 
Disk in Canada, but it has failed to 
reply to my enquiry. 

JE Fisher 

Chinnor 

Oxon 

You've neglected to mention how 
much memory you have inside your 
811. but the 'Fatal MV RAM Error' 
message sounds like the printer has 
run out of memory while trying to do 
the job. To print an A4 page in 
PostScript at 300 dpi you need at 
least 1.5Mb of memory in the 
printer; if you are going to download 
fonts as well, then you need 2Mb or 
more. That's memory Inside the 
printer I'm talking about, not inside 
the Amiga. 

Try cutting your page size down 
to A5 or smaller. If everything prints 
OK then it's almost certain that you 
have a memory problem. If the 
problem persists with A5, then I'm 
going to need many more details in 
order to find what you are doing 
wrong. You really need to send me a 
perfectly exact, step-by-step 
description of what you are doing, 
plus the exact wording of any error 
messages you get. 

Star's implementation of 
PostScript - 'StarScript' - is not 100 
per cent Adobe compatible (Adobe 
being the inventor of PostScript). 
Gold Disk's PostScript output is 100 
per cent Adobe, and the PostScript 
files that come out of Professional 
Page 3.0 are probably the most 
sophisticated PostScript output of 
any program ever written. Sometimes 
this 'perfection' causes problems 
with PostScript devices that do not 
implement PostScript fully or 
completely properly. 

PageStream's PostScript output 
has always been a bit simple, and 
Soft-Logik has recently developed a 
new and better PostScript driver for 
it. If you are a registered PageStream 
user the best thing to do is write to 
Soft-Logik and ask for a copy. 

I'd also recommend that you 
upgrade your software to the latest 
versions. 

Professional Page 3.0 and 
Professional Draw 3.0, In particular, 
are much better than the old 
versions you are using. I regularly 
use PostScript output from these two 
programs, and rarely have problems. 
JW 



54 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



—jwjy/?xf- 



CD QUESTIONS 

HI am a 14 year old 
student, and I have 
decided to buy an 
A570 CD-ROM drive 
for my 2Mb Chip RAM Amiga A500 
Plus as opposed to the GVP 52Mb 
hard drive, and I have a few 
questions about the upgrade: 

a) Does the A570 come with a SCSI 
interface so that I can plug in a bare 
drive without a controller? 

b) How easy would it be to fit this 
hard disk? Would I need to take the 
drive apart, and therefore invalidate 
my warranty? 

c) Where can I get CD-ROM 
software from? 

d) Will Full Motion Video be 
available for the AS70 later? Will I 
be able to sell my present A570 and 
buy a new one, or will it involve a 
simple replacement of chips? 

e) I will also need another 2Mb of 
Fast RAM. Will the A570 Itself 
cater for on-board RAM? 

f) Are my choices the right ones? I 
do not want to throw away money, 
especially if no-one produces 
software for the A570. 

J Sanders 

Claines 

Worchester 

a) The A570 does not come with an 
SCSI interface. Commodore 
produces a SCSI plug-in card which 
should be available by the time that 
you read this for around £100. 

b) It should be relatively 
straightforward. You will not need to 
open your A570 case, as the drive 
fits externally. The SCSI card plugs 
into a special slot in the back of the 
unit which is compatible with the one 
on the back of the CDTV. You 
unscrew the back plate and insert 
the SCSI card enabling you to add 
external SCSI drives. This is the easy 
bit. You will, however, need a power 
supply for the drive as the Amiga 
PSU will not be able to supply power 
to everything. It is also advisable, for 
safety's sake, get a specially made 
external SCSI device case - these 
are available from a number of 
manufacturers quite cheaply these 
days. 

c) It's actually CDTV software you will 
have to buy. If you buy CD-ROM 
software, although you will be able to 
read what is on the disks, you will 
not be able to use the information. 
CDTV disks are now available from a 
number of dealers and high street 
electrical chains such as Dixons. 
Alternatively, it is possible to get 
CDTV software through mail order. 

d) Full Motion Video (or FMV) is not 
available for the CDTV currently. CD 
drives are quite slow, managing 
around 100K a second transfer rate, 
and considering a HAM picture is 
around 80K, this is not many frames 



per second. The trick is using special 
compression techniques such as M- 
PEG or J-PEG, all of which are 
tediously slow in software, although 
there are some new lightning fast 
hardware solutions to these 
problems. The CDTV can manage 
quarter screen motion video 
currently. It is unlikely you will see 
FMV on the CDTV for a while yet, but 
as soon as the J and MPEG chipsets 
drop in price, it is feasible that 
someone will produce an expansion 
card for both CDTVs and A570s. 

e) The A570 supports 2Mb of Fast 
RAM on board. 

f) This depends on what you are 
going to do, to be honest. You 
cannot write to a CD, consequently, 
if you use a lot of applications 
software such as wordprocessors, 
and paint packages, you are probably 
not going to gain anything from a CD 
drive until you add a hard disk too. If 
you do any programming, I would 
wholeheartedly recommend a hard 
disk and more memory rather than 
the CDTV drive. CDs are very 
powerful, and store upwards of 
600MB of information - and there 
are some stunning software titles 
available for it now, and under 
development at the moment. TS 

WHICH BOARD? 

I am considering 
buying a modem, 
■ although I am unsure 
about several things. 
There would be no use buying a 
modem without knowing any BBSs. 
Do you know of any that have 
started up in Ireland, preferably 
locally? 

Most decent BBSs seem to be 
in England. What would the price of 
a telephone call to one of these 
boards be? 

What exactly are modem 
traders? I hear It a lot although I 
haven't got a clue what It means. 
Do you have a favourite BBS? 

Mr Bean 

Warrenpoint 

County Down 

One very good BBS in Ireland is 
Yukon Ho! on « 0232 768163. It's 
based in Belfast and is always very 
busy. I'm sure the sysop will be able 
to give you some other Irish board 
numbers if you give him a ring; 
remember to mention Amiga 
Shopper. The price of a call to 
England from Ireland will be exactly 
the same as a long distance call 
within Ireland, check with BT for the 
exact price. 

Modem traders are people who 
illegally trade pirate software using 
modems. These are the sort of 
modem users who give comms a bad 
name, and you should avoid them at 
all costs. 

My favourite BBS is End Zone 





LICENSED TO MODEM 

I would be grateful if you could help with a few modem 
details. Is it true that: 

a) FAST (Federation Against Software Theft) watches and 
traces downloaded software? 

b) FAST has a 78% chance of closing all BBSs? 

c) You need a modem licence? 

d) FAST pays you visits to check your modem Is being used correctly? 

e) Phone rates don't apply? 

What do you think of the Eurolink, Hyundai, Supra 2400 and Supra 
2400 Plus modems? 

Paul Schofield 

West Basildon 

Essex 

a) FAST does not "watch" downloaded software. It does sometimes 
investigate BBSs which it thinks are home to illegal activities, namely pirate 
software. 

b) FAST will only close down a board if it houses pirate software; the majority 
of boards are in absolutely no danger of being closed by FAST. 

c) No, you don't need a modem licence. 

d) FAST doesn't pay you visits to check your modem, it is not concerned with 
your modem, only pirate software. 

e) Phone rates definitely do apply. Phone calls made using a modem cost 
exactly the same as a normal call. 

As far as the four modems you mentioned go, I would recommend the 
Supra 2400 Plus. It is very similar to the others but includes data 
compression which will speed up downloads of uncompressed files. PH 



(w 0524 752245), mainly because 
of the friendly sysop and the wide 
range of software that's available. I 
also enjoy visits to Chiba City (« 
0501 44262) and Guru-10 (» 0738 
52063). PH 

PLUS STATUS 

Hln your March Issue 
you mentioned that 
an A500 board could 
be upgraded to 1Mb 
of Chip RAM on the mother board. 
In the May issue of Amiga Format, 
page 212, 1 read that ft is possible 
to upgrade an ASOO to that of an 
A500 Plus If you have revision 6 or 
7. As you can see I have already 
made the changes on the mother 
board revision 6 for 1Mb of Chip 
RAM. My question Is - can I add the 
four chips, four capacitors, ECS 
Denlse and a 2Mb Agnus to the 
mother board to make this upgrade 
or are there other changes to the 
mother board that I would need to 
do? And if so, will my Supra A501 
clone work giving me 1.5Mb of Chip 
RAM until I can find a 1Mb 
expansion board over here? Thanks 
for a great magazine. I just started 
reading it In Febraury and wish I'd 
found you sooner. 

Scott Tracy 

Brooklyn Park 

Minnesota 

I'm afraid not. The A500 boards 
can't be upgraded to 2Mb Chip RAM 
in that way, you will need to get the 
DKB Mega-Chip board which will add 
1Mb of Chip RAM and the 8372B-HR 
2Mb Agnus chip to the Amiga 
500/2000 or CDTV. JR 



GREEDY FOR ANSWERS 

Ha) I have an A500 
populated with 2Mb 
of memory, an A590 
unit with a 50Mb 
SCSI hard disk, and 1Mb of memory 
on the A590 controller board. The 
problem I have is that every now 
and then my machine will corrupt 
the screen (usually vertical lines). 
When eventually the Amiga can't 
take any more corruption, It freezes. 
On reboot the floppy drive is 
completely ignored and still the 
screen corrupts hideously. The only 
solution I've found is switching 
everything off, leaving it for about 
20 seconds and switching back on. 
This would suggest to me that this 
Isn't a heat problem, as everything 
Is 99% of the time OK after the 
previous course of action. What I 
am wondering is whether the 
display chip (Agnus?) Is faulty... 
The problem can happen at any 
time, it's not as if I'm doing any- 
thing processor-straining like 
running 20 applications at the same 
time, while attempting to Sierra 
dither a scanned hi-res image! 

b) Every now and then I'll tum my 
Amiga on and the caps lock key will 
flash on and off steadily. The hard 
disk will boot as normal, mouse will 
work as normal, but the keyboard is 
locked. It's more than likely a faulty 
keyboard processor chip. Can you 
suggest to whom I can send my 
keyboard to get It rectified? 

c) I have an early Amiga which has 
an American keyboard lay-out, but 
there Isn't a pound sign to be seen. 
A friend did tell me that there is a 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



—Mj-jWjdL 




CHEAPER COLOURJET DRIVER 

I have an Integrex Colourjet 132 printer. Now, twice people 
have written In wanting Information on a driver for this great 
printer. You say it costs around £50. Not so. The address 
you have Is correct, but it costs only £10 Inc P&P. 
Also It Is very Important to use the special paper, which costs £16 per 
roll. However I always use sensitised photocopy paper, and get first class 
prints; something to do with the ink not soaking Into the paper and losing 
the depth of colour. 

Cpl McFegan 
BFPO 

Integrex did indeed drop the price of the Colourjet 132 driver (on July 1 this 
year) to £10. although I hasten to add that at the time the previous details 
went to press, the £50 price was correct. Anybody who wants the driver, 
should contact Integrex on 0283 551551. JW 



hot-key to do this, but I can't for the 
life of me remember what, 
d) Later on In the year I plan to part 
exchange my A500 for either an 
A1500 or A2000 (A1500 knowing 
my money situation!) and assume 
that the A1500 will have Klckstart 
2.04 and Workbench 2. On hearing 
about compatibility problems I have 
become a little cautious, as I have 
many disks that all work well with 
my current system. 

I have seen an advert for the 
Phoenix ROM sharer. Just how 
reliable are they? In short, would It 
solve the Workbench 2 friendliness 
problem? Commodore really should 
be ashamed of Itself. When I had an 
ST I thought the STE compatibility 
problem was laughable, but 
Commodore's really cuts It. I use 
Scanlab 100, Deluxe Paint IV and 
lots of other programs and as a 
paying customer I expect all of 
these to function just the same with 
Workbench 2 as they do with 1.3. 

While on the subject of the 



A1500, Could you please give a 
brief specification on it? I'm 
particularly Interested as to whether 
my expensive A590 becomes 
obsolete or not. 

e) I have a 50Mb SCSI hard disk 
sitting In its anti- static bag waiting 
to be installed, the problem being I 
need to daisy-chain it to my existing 
A590 unit. It's just a bare hard disk, 
so I need a case, SCSI data cable 
and a PSU, but I'm clueless as to 
what and how to go about it. 

f) Is it feasible to use a standard 
parallel or serial T-switchbox for use 
with things like my MIDI Interface 
and scanner, switching between the 
two as and when I need them. 

g) I bought Devpac 3 a while back 
because I saw the advert boasting a 
snazzy window environment. I was 
looking forward to learning to 
program assembler in a pleasing-to- 
look-at screen format. Plngl My 
dream disappeared. Just a dreary 
Workbench type display smiling 
weakly back at me. I tinkered 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Guru - A message from the Amiga system saying that a fatal error has 
occurred. The message includes two numbers which are of use to 
programmers trying to ascertain why their programs have failed. 

Klckstart - The most basic and central part of the Amiga's operating system. 
These days it is held in ROM, so that it is immediately present when the 
machine is switched on. 

MIDI - Musical Instrument Digital Interface is a standard devised by 

electronic instrument manufacturers, allowing a number of synthesisers 
to be controlled by a single keyboard or sequencer. 

NTSC - National Television Standards Committee. This is the name for the 
TV colour coding system used in the USA and other countries. It has 525 
lines, running at 60 fields aand 30 frames/second. 

ROM - Read Only Memory is used to store essential programs, such as 
Klckstart and many of the library routines. These do not have to be re- 
loaded each time the Amiga is switched on because ROM retains its 
contents without power. No new information can be written to ROM, 
hence the name Read Only. 

ROM sharer - A device which will hold more than one ROM (the chip in which 
Kickstart is stored) and enable the user to choose which version to use 
when the machine starts up. 



about, even booted off the floppy , 
but still It smiled. Workbench 2 
suddenly drifted across my eyes and 
I re-read the advert, but no mention 
of the fact that the screens shown 
were from WB 2. It even says in the 
manual that the display on 1.3 
version Is WB 2 like - yeah right! 
It's a terrific package, but I would 
rather have a soothing look to It all, 
it makes programming so much 
nicer. Am I doing something wrong 
or have I Just been misled? 
h) Weird dreams - Just how the hell 
do you get past the nasty little girl 
In the garden? I hope you can help 
me with these problems. Cheers! 

KD Ellis 

Chelmsford 

Essex 

a) On the A590 problem, I'm afraid it 
sounds like a major internal A500 
fault. It may be the Agnus chip, but it 
could be caused by a faulty RAM 
chip. I'd suggest that you get your 
Amiga checked out professionally (if 
you intend to keep it). 

b) The keyboard fault is very 
common. This keyboard I'm typing on 
at the moment often does the same 
thing. It's a design fault in A500 
keyboards. Some do this, others 
don't. I'm afraid you'll have to put up 
with it. Pressing down on the 
keyboard controller chip when 
running will often cure the problem 
(There's a place on the Amiga 500 
keyboard that you can hit to cure this 
problem every time. A neat party 
trick, but not recommended!) 

c) You can use the UK keymap and 
press Shift-3, or, if you keep the US 
keymap most software will print a 
pound sign by typing Left-Alt L. 

d) As for ROM sharers, I personally 
don't use one, but I know several 
people who do, who have had no 
problems, although one of my 
colleagues at work managed to blow 
up his 2.04 ROM with one. I have a 
large collection of software, and I've 
found almost all of it works with 
2.04. Nothing that didn't work I felt 
was worth spending the money on a 
ROM switcher for. I'd say use 
Kickstart 2.04 for a while, if you find 
you really need a switcher then get 
one. Make sure you plug in the chips 
the right way round though! 

The Amiga 1500 is exactly the 
same as the Amiga 2000. it has five 
Zorro II expansion slots, a big case 
capable of holding lots of expansions 
including accelerators and flicker 
fixers, and a big meaty power supply 
that will power all your kit without 
problems. 

At current pricing the Amiga 
1500 is a real bargain, considering 
the expandability and reliability of the 
system you're getting. The Amiga 
A590 won't work in the Amiga 1500, 
but the Commodore A2091 card is 
an identical card for the Amiga 1500 



which will control SCSI hard drives 
and also take the 2Mb of RAM from 
the A590. A SCSI drive formatted on 
the A590 can be transferred to the 
A2091 (or a GVP controller for that 
matter) without having to reformat. 

e) Linking your 50Mb SCSI drive to 
the back of your A590 is expensive. 
External SCSI cases are expensive 
(around £120), plus you'll need a 
SCSI cable (around £15). Your best 
bet is to replace the internal drive 
with the 50Mb, unless you can find a 
cheap case with power supply in a 
junk shop or auction. 

f) Many external devices, particularly 
samplers, don't work well through 
switch boxes, so it's not 
recommended. If you do buy a switch 
box, make sure it has all 25 wires 
connected through. Some cheaper 
boxes do not have all lines 
connected and do not work with the 
Amiga. 

g) And you don't like how Devpac 3.0 
looks? Come on! If you want a nice 
flashy Workbench, then buy 
Workbench 2.04. Major commercial 
packages will stop supporting 
Kickstart 1.3 soon (many useful PD 
packages are already 2.04 only). 

h) See a psychiatrist. JR 

WHAT THE HECK? 

I would like to know 
where I can get an 
American (NTSC) 
version of the A520 
modulator. 

I require one of these because I 
have been given an NTSC composite 
colour monitor which I want to use 
with my Amiga 500 Plus. It runs 
happily at 50Hz but only shows the 
PAL video in black and white. 
Please help me - a proper monitor 
costs a fortune and our telly is 
really naff. 

Stephen Conner 

Kelvinside 

Glasgow 

Well, the obvious place to get the 
modulator is the home of NTSC - 
good ol' USA. Try looking in the 
adverts of an American magazine 
such as Amiga World. Alternatively, 
you could advertise in the Amiga 
Shopper small ads just in case there 
happen to be any US servicemen 
stationed here who might be able to 
help out. 

One thing though - simply 
connecting an NTSC modulator to 
your PAL Amiga 500 won't solve the 
problem. You'll also need to force 
the Amiga to run at NTSC (60Hz) 
frequency. There are a number of 
utilities which can do this, such as 
60Hz, PowerUtil and Degrader, 
though I can't say whether all (or 
any) of your software will work 
correctly if you do this! 

Contact a PD library for such 
programs. GW 




BA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



mm. 




EMPTIES PLEASE 

A short while ago I 
was looking for a 
printer. I was going to 
buy a Star LC24-200 
but soon changed my mind as I read 
about the BJ-lOex and its superior 
graphics capabilities. What's more, 
I read that there was a colour 
upgrade available from System 
Insight. I obtained details of the 
upgrade and bought the printer. 

According to the sheet I 
received from System Insight I 
needed three empty BC-01 
cartridges. It also stated that it 
could supply me with pre-filled 
cartridges containing the different 
colours needed. When I was about 
to order the kit I checked with 
System Insight about the pre-filled 
cartridges, and was told that It did 
not do them as it could not get hold 
of any. I was told that the only way I 
could convert my printer was to buy 
three black cartridges, empty their 
contents Into another container for 
future use, clean them out with the 
cleaning fluid provided in the kit, 
and refill them with the different 
coloured inks. 

Obviously I want to avoid buying 
more black ink which I do not need, 
and cannot afford. So do you know 
of anyone who can supply me with 
some empty cartridges at a 
reasonable price? Or can any of the 
readers help? 

M Solomon 

35 Wentoworth Avenue 

Wellingborough 

Northants NN8 5PE 

Sounds to me like all the BJ-lOex 
owners are keeping their empty 
cartridges so that they can refill 
them. System Insight's suggestion 
would appear to be the only solution, 
but if anyone has an empty cartridge 
to spare, how about helping Mr 
Solomon out? JW 

THE ECS TRAIL 

HMost program disks I 
have are protected by 
Virus Stomper V2, 
which informs me that 
"ECS Chips are Detected." On a 
friend's machine, six months older 
than mine, It does not do this, 
although the 50/60Hz register 
switch works as I have used it. 
Now, I have bought an Action 
Replay Mk III cartridge. When I type 
"CHIPREGS" It lists out all the 
register offsets and their names. 
Some have "ECS" after them, but I 
have no record of them. What are 
they, how can I find out more, and 
how can I get my programs to 
detect if "ECS" chips are present? 
G Wilson 
Holywell 
Clwyd 



It is highly likely that your friend's 
machine has only half of the ECS 
inside it. Commodore shipped 
Amigas with just the ECS Agnus chip 
long before it shipped them with the 
ECS Denise too. The reasons for this 
were that the Agnus chip allowed for 
1Mb of Chip RAM. which was 
important with more modern 
graphics-intensive applications. You, 
on the other hand, have the full ECS 
chip set. The PAL/NTSC switch 
register you describe is in the Agnus 
chip, which is why it works on both 
machines. 

The ECS registers are quite 
dangerous to use, and it is actually 
possible to blow up your monitor by 
tinkering with them. You can set 
some totally impossible video values 
using them and cause the display to 
lock. This can be a very expensive 
mistake indeed! I would not 
recommend tinkering with the ECS 
registers at all, as it is not necessary 
and you can cause genuine hardware 
damage. If, despite my warning, you 
still want to know about these 
registers, you can find information 
about them in edition three of the 
Hardware Reference Manual, 
published by Addison Wesley. This 
will also tell you how to detect if ECS 
chips are present. There are better 
ways of detecting the presence of 
the various custom chips - and they 
are legal, unfortunately you have to 
have 2.04 or above to use them. 
Under 2.04 you can examine the 
graphics base structure (which you 
get after opening the graphics. library) 
ChipRevBitsO which will have various 
flags set depending on which chips 
are present inside your Amiga. 

In general you should avoid 
"poking" the hardware registers, as, 
should Commodore upgrade the 
Amiga range in the near future, then 
you might find incompatibilities. IS 

MAGIC OF GANDALF 

■mav ■ have recently 
. ^^^ ^ acquired a second- 
I hand modem for a 
^ mmmm J^ tenner. It's made by 
Digital Comms Ltd and Is called 
Gandalf LDS120A. The back plate 
contains... 

LDS120A E STANDALONE 
PN 3751ZZ 
W/N 240V M0D404 
L 

Can I connect it to the Amiga? 
What lead will I need, and where 
can I buy one? What should the six 
dip switches be set to? 

Ian Dutton 

Erdington 

Birmingham 

It's quite probable that you can use 
this modem with your Amiga using a 
standard lead available from 
somewhere like Trilogic. As for the 
dip switches I would leave them as 



they are. The only way to be able to 
find out what they are is to get in 
touch with Digital Comms. PH 

BIG GURUS 

Ha) I have an Amiga 
1500 with a GVP 
Impact II HD 
controller with 8Mb of 
Fast RAM and a 52Mb Quantum HD, 
GVP Combo 33MHz accelerator with 
4Mb of 32-bit Fast RAM and the 
new ECS and AmigaDOS/ 
Workbench 2. 1 have included a 
Syslnfo listing for the configuration. 

The problem lies with some 
games and autobooting coverdlsks. 
When I try to load them with the 
accelerator running, the disk won't 
boot up and I get a reboot or guru, 
usually 8000000B or 80000004, 
although I do get some others. I 
was wondering if It had anything to 
do with the Memory Management 



Unit on the accelerator as most of 
the games that fall are advertised 
as running on A3000s, and although 
the A1500 with accelerator Isn't 
fully compatible with the A3000 I 
would still have expected the disks 
to boot. This means that I have to 
run BOOT68000 from Workbench, to 
disable the accelerator, then Insert 
the disks to boot In DFO:. 
b) I am using an Audio Engineer 
Plus II sampler connected via a 
parallel switcher. I use a set of 
phono cables to connect It to 
various audio equipment, but when I 
try to sample in stereo I get loads of 
noise. I've tried to adjust the bias 
control on the back of the sampler 
and put on the audio Alter, but It 
doesn't help. I also tried connecting 
the leads to various outputs on my 
equipment from AUX outputs to 
headphone sockets. The noise Is 
hardly audible when sampling in 




WHICH HARD DRIVE? 

I would like to purchase a hard drive and I was looking at the 
GVP Impact Series II type, because as far as I can tell this Is 
the best. I have read that GVP Is releasing this hard drive 
with an accelerator built-in, called the A530. 

I would like to know a few things about the drive though, before I decide to 

buy it. 

a) Does the additon of a hard drive allow you to run 3Mb programs eg 
Vlstapro on a 2Mb machine, or do you have to add the SIMM chips to 
expand the memory? 

b) Do the SIMM chips add memory to the Amiga or the hard drive? 

c) The GVP A530 Turbo HD is able to take 32 x 1Mb - 60 and 32 x 4Mb - 
60 Simm chips but will it also accept the 1Mb x 8 SIMMs that the 
standard GVP hard drive takes? 

d) Does the GVP drive have auto parking heads, or do you have to do ft 
manually? 

e) Does the hard drive have a pass-thru connector enabling the addition of 
other hardware such as the Action Replay cartridge or do you have to 
remove the hard drive? 

f) If you remove the hard drive, is the Information stored on It lost, or Is it 
retained for a period of time; If the latter Is true, how long for? 

g) If you decide to add SIMMs does ft Invalidate any warranty on the drive? 
h) I have read that the A530 Is 1Mb populated. Does this mean that it 
comes with 1Mb of SIMMs built-in? 

Steven Innell 

Stratford 

London 

a) You will still need to add RAM to your system to run programs like 
VistaPro. All hard drives give you is more storage space - you need extra 
RAM to enable you to run larger programs or run more programs at once. 
3Mb of RAM is the minimum for a useable serious machine nowadays. 

b) RAM added to the hard disk controller is used by the Amiga not the hard 
drive. 

c) No, the GVP A530 will only take the expensive GVP 32-bit SIMMS. 

d) All the current GVP hard drives autopark. 

e) No, the GVP controllers do not have a through-port. The problem with 
through ports is that they are notoriously unreliable. You can buy an adaptor 
from Datel Electronics for £20 which will enable you to plug in both the 
Action Replay and the hard drive. The current Action Replay III has problems 
if you have more than 3Mb of RAM though. 

f) Hard drives, like floppy disks, should retain the data on them forever, apart 
from your drive breaking down or you accidently deleting your data. 

g) No. You can add extra memory to all GVP products without invalidating the 
warranty, although it is best to ask your supplier to fit them for you if you are 
at all unsure of how to do this. 

h) The A530 has 1Mb of RAM chips soldered on to the board, so you can fit 
more SIMMS to increase this. JR 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



5H 



mono, but it's still there. Could it be 
the leads I'm using or is It the 
sampler? If it's the sampler, could 
you recommend anywhere I could 
get It repaired? I bought it through 
Silica Shop in Sidcup on a special 
order (it doesn't normally stock it) 
and I don't think that It will be able 
to repair It. 

c) Could you recommend a good 
AmigaDOS manual? 

d) Finally, is it possible to connect 
the A570 CD ROM to a A1500 via a 
Zorro II slot or SCSI port? If not, do 
you know If Commodore is releasing 
one for the A1500/2000. 

Kevin Breidenbach 

Heme Bay 

Kent 

a) There's no reason why games that 
work on the Amiga 3000 should fail 
on your system. The only thing I can 
think of is that the speed difference 
between a 25MHz and your 33MHz 
system is enough to upset the timing 
systems in the badly-written loaders 
of some commercial games. 

b) Turn off your monitor when 
sampling. Some monitors give 
terrible noise when used with the 
Audio Engineer. I found that by 
turning off the monitor I got perfect 
samples. Make sure that no power 
cables are near the leads and try to 
keep the box away from the 
computer. 

c) It depends on what you want to do 
with AmigaDOS. I use the manual 
that comes with the Kickstart 2.04 
Upgrade pack, which is really good. 
The Bantam AmigaDOS manual (3rd 
edition) is good too. 

d) No, the A570 CDROM will only 
work in the Amiga 500. I have no 
idea whether CBM will release a 
version for the Amiga 1500/2000, 
but I hope it does. JR 

MIDI MATTERS 

I have a MIDI 
ISV^ keyboard and an 
Amiga 500 with a 
hard drive. All I want 
to do Is to put the two together so 
that I can play on the MIDI 
keyboard, score the music, display 
and edit it as a musical score and 
then finally print it out on to paper 
(both clefs). Is there any such 
package that will do this? I've 
already heard of Dr T's Copyist, but 
I don't know where I can buy it. Can 
you suggest any alternatives? 

GT Robinson 

St Annes On Sea 

Lanes 

The first thing you need to buy is a 
MIDI interface to mate the Amiga and 
your keyboard together. These are 
available from most Amiga Shopper 
advertisers. Software wise Dr.T's 
Copyist is about the best scoring 
package available for the Amiga. It's 





available from MCMXCIX which can 
be contacted on » 071 258 3454. 
JH 

MULTIPLE CHOICE 

I'm looking at the 
possibility of setting 
up a multimedia 
system and I'm 
considering purchasing an A600HD 
solely for this purpose because it is 
compact and has a hard drive 
already installed. I would also need 
to connect a digitiser to this 
(probably Vidi- Amiga) - is this 
possible with the A600 or would I 
have to digitise using my A500 and 
copy the results to my A600? 
Could you advise me which 
multimedia package I should buy? 
My requirements are as follows: 

• It must be able to use HAM and 
32 colour IFF images, with on- 
screen text. 

• It must contain a variety of 
coloured and easy to read fonts, 
preferably outlined and available in 
different sizes. 

• It must be able to handle Deluxe 
Paint IV animation files. 

• It must be completely 
mouse/trackball driven. I would 
prefer if the user need never come 
into contact with the keyboard 
while the screen is running. 

• It would be advantageous if the 
package provided screen transitions 
accompanied with a variety of 
wipe/fade effects. 

• It would help if there was control 
for external procedures written in 
AMOS so that I could scroll screens 
and Include Bobs in my 
presentation. 

Over to you, Shopper Guru. 

JA Owen 
Holyhead 
Gwynedd 

As you aren't saying just what you 
intend to do with this multimedia 
system of yours I'm left a little in the 
dark. However, if you think that a 
20Mb hard disk (as fitted in the 
standard A600HD) will be enough for 
your application I would seriously ask 
you to reconsider. As soon as you 
have a few programs, fonts, graphics 
and animations on board you'll soon 
run out of space and you'll wish 
you'd been more sensible and got a 
bigger hard drive. 

Even by compressing your 
programs, hard disks fill up 
unbelievably fast, however ruthless 
your management of them might be. 
On the other hand, if the A600HD is 
to be a stand-alone information 
centre, for instance, then 20Mb may 
suffice. An obvious alternative is to 
add a reasonably sized HD to your 
A500 - such as a GVP 52Mb, or see 
if you can buy a second-hand Amiga 
1500 complete with hard drive. Of 
course, there's always the possibility 



of using a RAM card in the PCMCIA 
slot, but these aren't in evidence yet. 

Enough of the hardware 
problems and on to the software. I 
would have no hesitation in 
recommending Sca/a VideoStudio 
113 (which used to be Scala 1.13). 
Although it can't communicate with 
AMOS and use Bobs, it can scroll 
screens and use brushes, and it 
does everything else you ask for, and 
plenty more. OK, for constructing 
presentations it's not entirely mouse 
driven - but for my money there's 
nothing to touch it for power and 
flexibility, as well as ease of use. 
From a user's point of view, the 
presentation can be controlled 
completely by the mouse, so I think 
Sca/a is your best bet. It comes with 
a good selection of typefaces, wipes, 
backgrounds and other options and 
certainly represents good value for 
money. 

Don'l forget you'll also need to 
add at least a couple of megs more 
memory to the A600 if you want to 
play back reasonably sized 
animations and for Scala to be 
completely functional. 

Lastly, the people at Rombo tell 
me that its new Vidi-Amiga 12 will 
work with the A600 and connects to 
the computer s parallel port and 
external disk drive port. It should be 
out by the time you read this and, of 
course, we'ii have a review as soon 
as possible. GW 

2MB CHIP RAM? 

H I've just sent my 500 
away to ACS 
Electronics for 
upgrade to WB 2.04 
and Kickstart 2 (after making 
adjustments to the motherboard I 
already had 1Mb Chip RAM) but one 
thing I can't work out is what 
expansion I need to take it up to 



2Mb Chip? A 1.3 upgrade or a 2.04 
upgrade board? When my machine 
returns ft will have both Kickstarts 
fitted in a ROM sharer. I will also 
obviously need a clock fitted to the 
expansion board. I haven't seen a 
need to have the Super Denise 
fitted. Will this affect the 
conversion in any way? 

A Rae 

Northallerton 

N Yorkshire 

To upgrade to 2Mb of Chip RAM, you 
will need the DKB Meg-A-Chip board, 
which costs around £199 including 
the extra 1Mb of RAM. For the clock 
you will probably have to replace your 
0.5Mb expansion for an expansion 
with a clock; I ve not seen anyone 
selling the clock separately. JR 

MISSING BITS 

J"~T^ I have a couple of 
I very serious 

I If I 1 P r °b' erns w '* n 
I^^^^J Professional Page 
2.1, both Involving fonts. My system 
is an Amiga 2000 fitted with a Solid 
State Leisure B5000 accelerator 
and 11Mb of RAM - 1Mb Chip, 8Mb 
Fast, 2Mb 32-bit RAM on the 
B5000. 

I have been trying to print out 
fairly large characters for various 
posters and signs that I have been 
asked to do, typically letters and 
numbers between 500-700 points. 
Some are rotated on the page, all 
are solid filled black. 

Everything is fine on-screen at 
all magnifications, as Is printing out 
at resolutions up to 150 dpi. 
However, when I try to print the 
final versions at 300 dpi, everything 
goes disastrously wrong! All that 
gets printed are the outlines of the 

contiwed on page 60 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



AmigaDOS - Part of the collection of programs in the operating system that 
take care of the general running of the machine. AmigaDOS concerns 
itself with device-handling: control of the keyboard, basic screen output, 
disk drives, printers and so on. 

Chip RAM - The area of the Amiga's memory directly accessible by the 
custom graphics and sound chips. Originally a maximum of 512K, newer 
machines fitted with the fatter Agnus graphics chip can access 1Mb, 
enabling smoother animations and more screens to be displayed at 
once. The new A600 cbmes with an Agnus chip capable of addressing 
2Mb of Chip RAM. 

Fast RAM - Any extra memory which is not Chip RAM. The custom chips 
cannot access it; since such accesses to Chip RAM can block out the 
central processor and slow down its own accesses, Fast RAM is faster. 

HAM - Hold And Modify Is an Amiga graphic mode allowing all 4096 colours 
to be displayed at once, with certain restrictions. 

IFF- Interchange File Format is a means by which data from different 
graphics or sound sampling programs are saved in a compatible way. It 
allows data to be exchanged between programs very easily. 



5fl AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



AMIVISION SOFTWARE PRESENT A POWERFUL, 
EASY TO USE DATABASE FOR ALL AMIGA OWNERS. 




PowerBase combines both user-friendliness with hundreds of powerful 

features. Pull down menus and a Video Cassette Recorder style control panel 

help make this one of the most easy to use programs ever seen on the Amiga. 

Requires 1 MB of memory. 

The POWERful dataBASE system 

* Up to 10,000 records on a 1Mb Amiga 

* Easy to use thanks to pull down menus S a V.C.R 
style control panel 

* 7 Field types, including the ability to include 
IFF pictures (even in HAM mode) and unlimited 
length text documents within your records 

* Lightning fast search (2 types), sort (3 types) and 
filter facilities 

* Label printing, reporting and many other printer 
options 

* Design an unlimited number of layouts (forms) for 
your files 

* Built in help files on all of PowerBase's features 

* Hard disk installation utility and many additional 
utilities 

* Other features include: timed autosave, many 
preferences (including a printer preferences section), 
add/edit fields at any time, record calculation, key 
macros, keyboard shortcuts, password protection, 
auto capitalisation, and much more all from one 
integrated package. 



"An essential purchase" 

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"the finest example of 

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Complete with user m anual for just £9.95 

Please make cheque/postal order payable to S.Rennocks 
Price includes postage & package. Compatible with all Amiga machines 



FREE-FREE* FREE -FREE 



We are so confident that you will like PowerBase v3.20 that we are offering a free 
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This compilation disk contains fully working demos of PowerBase v3.20 and Formula 

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(Dept.AS), 1 Cherrington Drive, Great Wyrley, Walsall VVS6 6NE 



+ SLMS fL/4$f1 * 



ATTENTION ALL COMPUTER OWNERS 

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WITH SERIOUSLY 

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We even supply programs lo lei you design your own fouls, or convert your 
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PRINTERS 

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parallel cable £199.00 

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Pip £2 £59.95 

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GVP A2000 Hard Drives 

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G-Force 030 25MHz 1Mb RAM 42Mb HDD £745 

G-Force 030 40MHz 4Mb RAM £789 

G-Force 030 40MHz 4Mb RAM 42Mb £975 

G-Force 030 50MHz 4Mb RAM £1115 
G-Force 030 50Mhz 4Mb RAM 42Mb £1299 

Call for Prices on Larger Drives 



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cwtitoed ffom pogt 51 

boxes on the page. Sometimes I get 
Just parts of the page printed out, 
but with It being badly corrupted - 
that Is, text not where it should be. 

Is this rather serious bug 
present in Professional Page 3.07 If 
It Is - or at least if you are not sure 
- will buying a PostScript laser 
printer solve the problem? 

Now to my second problem. 
Recently there have been a number 
of companies offering disks of 
cheap Compugraphlc typefaces. I 
jumped at the chance of more 
typefaces, and bought both Volumes 
1 and 2 from George Thompson 
Services to add to my collection. 

Unfortunately, after copying all 
the fonts to the CG Fonts: assigned 
directory of my hard drive, and 
running the supplied 'CGUpdate' 
program, I And that I am unable to 
use them all. The Select Typeface 
requester gives me a maximum of 
only 64 typefaces to choose from, 
excluding Bold and italic font 
variations, but there are at least 85 
typefaces in my CGFonts: directory. 
Helpl Is this a bug or serious 
limitation with Professional Page 
2.1, or have I done something 
wrong? If the problem Is 
Professional Page, will version 3.0 
allow more typefaces to be used? 

Stuart Davis 

Langley 

E Sussex 

Your first problem is well known. 
Both PageStream and Professional 
Page are notorious for this problem. 
Blame has been thrown about all 
over the place, from AGFA to Soft- 
Logik to Gold Disk to Commodore... 
buf at the end of the day it appears 
to be a bug in AGFA'S Compugraphic 
format. 

The problem was more marked in 
version 1.3 of Professional Page 
(and PageSetter II), which used an 
earlier implementation of the 
Compugraphic format and where you 
couldn't guarantee the dot-matrix 
output of any font much over 90 
points. 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



C - A compiled language designed primarily for systems programming. It was 
used to write much of the Amiga's operating system, and is used in the 
writing of many Amiga applications. 

CAD - Computer Aided Design applications provide designers with the 
graphical facilities to design buildings, circuit boards, and so on. 

Compugraphic fonts - Rather than a simple bit-mapped image of each 
character, which grows more jagged with magnification, a Compugraphic 
font represents the shape of each character within as a mathematical 
equation. Consequently, as the magnitude of the character is varied in 
printing, no information is lost and the result always looks smooth. 

Dlgitlser - A device which takes the analogue information taken by a source 
such as a video camera and converts it to digital screen information for 
use by a computer. 

Serial port - An interface port at the back of the Amiga, used mainly for 
connecting to a modem for communications purposes. Sometimes used 
for printers. With the serial port, data is sent one binary digit at a time 
(one eighth of the speed of the parallel port, which is more usually used 
for connecting to a printer). 



AGFA was supposed to have 
fixed it, but I find that things start 
going awry at about 250 points at 
360 dpi in Professional Page 3.0. 
The Pagestream 2.2 Addendum 
manual acknowledges the problem, 
and says it happens to 
Compugraphic characters 
approaching one inch tall. 

The solution, as you have 
guessed, is a PostScript printer; the 
problem will completely go away. 

But if you are going to buy a 
PostScript printer keep in mind that 
you'll need at least 2Mb of memory 
inside it, and that Adobe PostScript 
will be a safer bet than any particular 
manufacturer's 'compatible' 
implementation. 

I had no idea that Professional 
Page 2.1 had a 64 typeface 
maximum in the requester; there's 
nothing in the manual about it and I 
don't have my old version any more 
so I can't check it out. 

I've been using version 3.0 for 
some time, and I have more than 
200 typefaces in CGFonts;. all of 
them listed in the Typeface 
requester, so if it was a limitation, it 
isn't any longer. JW 




GERIATRIC WORKBENCH 

When trying to run PowerPacker It says that my version of 

Kickstart and Workbench are not high or new enough. As 

Klckstart is loaded from disk on the A3000, can you tell 

me where to get the latest version? My current version is 

Workbench 2.00 and Klckstart 46.68. 

Mi Harnden 

Stamford 

Uncs 

Good grief! That is a very old version indeed. The current release version of 
Workbench is 2.05, which is Kickstart 37.175 on the A3000, and 
Workbench 37.67 or higher. Your dealer will be able to provide you with the 
upgrade you require, or as a last resort you could ring Commodore and 
grovel to the people there. TS 



ACCELERATOR QUEST 



M 



Can you tell me the 
cheapest price of a 
68010 CPU, 8 and 
10MHz versions, and 
the 68020 board, and where I can 
get them from? 

Daniel Simpson 
New Cubbington 
Leamington Spa 

Firstly, it does not matter whether 
you get an 8, 10, 14 or 16MHz 
version of the 68010 chip, as 
regardless of this it will run at 
7.14MHz. The 68010 processor at 
7.14MHz is slightly faster than the 
68000 chip at the same clock 
speed. 68020 boards start at around 
£200. It's best to talk to your local 
dealer about which accelerator might 
be best for you. I would recommend 
that if you are planning on spending 
more than £200 on this that you 
look at boards from GVP's excellent 
range. IS 

FACTS ON FAX 

I've been wanting to 
buy a modem for 
ages and now have 
the money to buy 
one. So I bought Amiga Shopper 
knowing there would be something 
In it about modems. 

I came across the new Supra 
Fax Plus modem with up to 9600 
bits per second. I want to know 
whether, when my computer is off, 
the fax modem holds the 
Information till I call it up. I also 
want to know everything and 
exactly what the fax facility does. 
Eg: if I'm on the modem using it, 
can the phone still be used, ie 
receiving calls or dialling out (we 
only have one phone plug, but we 
have got an adaptor that splits one 




socket into two). 

I would appreciate this 
information and any other 
information I need to know about 
the fax modem before I buy It. 

Tristan Boger 
Aberdeenshire 

Firstly, the Supra Fax Plus is an 
excellent modem, well worth the 
money so you've made the right 
choice. The fax part of the modem 
will only work when the computer and 
modem is turned on and running 
some software (which should come 
with the modem). When someone 
wants to send you a fax the phone 
will ring just like any other call but if 
your modem is on the line, and the 
software is running, it will answer the 
phone and receive the fax. 

If you are using the modem on a 
phone line, either dialling out or 
receiving a call, the line can't be 
used by anyone else. It's exactly the 
same as phoning your friend; 
someone else can't use a different 
phone on the same line to call 
someone else at the same time. The 
splitter you have will enable you to 
keep your modem and a phone 
plugged in at the same time, but 
that's all. 

Essentially, modems are just like 
a normal phone, they work in similar 
ways, and cost the same to use. PH 

DTV ON THE PC? 

I have decided that a 
computer would help 
me in my various 
hobbies (as well as 
being a hobby in itself). Being new 
to computers, apart from some 
interesting times with a ZX81 when 
they first came out, I am unsure 
what is best for my applications, a 
PC or an Amiga. Here Is a list of my 
requirements... 

a) I need a card file system to list 
and locate magazines, possibly a 
'keyboard search' facility. 

b) A card file similar to point (a) but 
for handling 32mm slides. 

c) A word processor for letters and 
reports to a club magazine. 

d) A facility to draw and print out 
engineering and 

electrical/electronic drawings for 
hobby use. 

e) The ability to produce 3D 
drawings and view them at different 
angles. 

f) I also want to be able to scan in 
magazine articles so that they can 
be read from the monitor screen 
rather than from the magazine. It 
would be nice to be able to link this 
in with the database program 
mentioned In point (a). Is It possible 
to use a camcorder for this rather 
than having to spend out £100 or so 
on a hand scanner? 

g) I also want to title home videos 
and possibly dissolve/fade/wipe/ 




60 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



mm] 



superimpose titles over the top of 

an image. I understand that I will 

need a genlock for this. 

h) A video editing suite such as 

Syntronix Edltman or VideoPilot. Are 

there any cheaper alternatives 

available? 

I) Animation and morphlng which 

can be downloaded on to video 

tape. I suspect that the hardware 

required to do this will be 

expensive. 

I have been involved in home 
video production for some time now 
and I regularly buy video magazines. 
Although they all seem to mention 
the Amiga and Maze Software, none 
of them mention the PC. Reading 
the specs of the Amiga and PC, it 
seems to me that the PC is the 
more powerful machine as a similar 
priced PC has a faster processor. I 
have also been told that the Amiga 
needs lots of extra RAM and a 
processor accelerator to handle the 
sort of tasks that I've detailed 
above. Is thi9 true? Finally, do I 
need a monitor for the Amiga or will 
a TV suffice for the sort of 
applications that I've detailed? 

DWIld 

Woodley 

Stockport 

Having analysed your requirements, 
it seems pretty obvious to me that 
the Amiga is your only choice. 
Although the price of PCs has 
dropped substantially, the cost of the 
software and hardware that you will 
need to run the sort of applications 
that you have mentioned is 
astronomical on the PC. Take 
genlocks for example - a pretty well 
endowed Amiga genlock can be 
picked up for under £100 these days 
whereas PC genlocks are still a 
couple of hundred pounds for even a 
very basic unit. 

Sure, the PC has a faster 
processor, but the Amiga's 
processor is more than adequate for 
your requirements. You really don't 
need to splash out on a processor 
accelerator unless you plan on 
getting involved in heavyweight DTP 
or 24-bit graphics work - whoever 
told you that you need a processor 
accelerator to word process on the 
Amiga needs shooting! Anyway, 
here's a list of the sort of products 
you should be looking at based on 
your requirements. 

a) The vast majority of databases will 
handle your first requirement with 
both hands tied behind their backs! 
Even a public domain database such 
as AmiBase III will be more than 
adequate. 

b) Unless you actually intend storing 
the slides in graphical format, the 
same database that handles 
requirement 1 will also handle this. If 
you need to handle graphic images 
as well, then something like Super- 




CASE FOR CONVERSION 

In the June 1991 Issue of New Computer Express there was 
a review of a case conversion kit for the A500 called the 
'A1500' which was produced by a company called 
Checkmate Digital. This kit enabled you to strip the guts 

out of an A500 and fit them Inside a solid steel casing which provided a 

separate keyboard and - more Importantly - more room for expansion. 
Since that date though, I have not seen the A1500 advertised. Is it 

still available? Alternatively, are there any other kits available of this 

kind? 

Anon 

As far as I'm aware, the A1500 case conversion kit is no longer produced. 
Instead, Checkmate (the company responsible for the A1500) has started 
to market a vastly enhanced version called the Hi-Q system based around 
an 'off the shelf PC tower system casing. To be perfectly honest, I was 
never really that impressed by the original A1500 but the Hi-Q Tower is a 
totally different ball game altogether. It is far more expandable and actually 
looks quite nice (unlike the A1500!). Checkmate can be contacted on 
w 071 923 0658. JH 



Base Professional is the best bet. 

c) Unless you intend writing very 
large documents, any Amiga word 
processor will handle the task of 
writing letters and reports. Why not 
try Kindwords 3? 

d) What you need is a CAD package. 
By far the best 'budget' CAD package 
available for the Amiga is X-CAD 
2000 from Digital Multimedia Ltd. It 
costs £129 and is available from 
DML on 081 977 1105. You may 
well be surprised to leam that XCAD 
running on a standard Amiga is 
faster than AutoCAD (the PC's top 
CAD package!) running on a 386 PC. 
Who ever said Amiga applications 
are slow? 

e) X-CAD 2000 will also handle this 
task too. The latest release of X-CAD 
includes a 3D modeller that lets you 
turn 2D CAD drawings into 3D 
objects. 

f) Even on a PC, you'll need a video 
digitiser (costing around £100) to 
use a camcorder to 'digitise' the 
pages of a magazine into your Amiga. 
A much better bet is a hand scanner 
such as 'PowerScan 2' from Power 
Computing which costs just £99. 
Hand scanners produce a much 
more even scan than a digitiser. 

g) The reason why video magazines 
don't mention the PC but rave on 
about the Amiga is simply because 
the Amiga is the best machine there 
is for this sort of work. The choice of 
video software available is second to 
none. If your budget is tight, I would 
advise you to buy the Roctec 
RG300C genlock which comes as 
standard with fade and dissolve 
controls. Better still, these are 
available for as little as £75 these 
days. Just check out the adverts in 
Amiga Shopper for the best deal. 
Software-wise, your best bet is Scala 
500 from Silica Systems. 

h) The cheapest video editing suite 
I've seen for the Amiga is Gold 
Disk's Video Director package. This 
connects to most LANC-equipped 
video decks and cameras and 




virtually automates tape assembly. It 
costs £130 and is available from 
Silica Systems on 081 309 1111. 
i) The best budget package available 
for animation and morphing is Deluxe 
Paint 4. 

Once again, scan the adverts 
within this issue for the best pricing. 
Hope all this information helps you in 
your endeavours! JH 

2ND HAND MONITOR 
BLUES (PARTI) 

Perhaps you can help. 
I recently purchased 
an Olivetti colour 
monitor (model CDU 
1200) and wondered how to 
connect ft so that I can use it with 
my Amiga 500. 1 have no manual 
and therefore do not know the 
wiring of the 25-way D-plug on the 
rear of the monitor, or what kind of 
lead I need. 

I know you must get a lot of 
mail, but a personal reply would be 
very much appreciated. I look 
forward to hearing from you soon. 

P Jones 
Runcorn 
Cheshire 

Thanks to Olivetti's helpful and 
knowledgeable PC Helpline (» 0908 
690790) I have some news which 
isn't going to please you, Mr Jones. 

I'm afraid to say that the CDU 
1200 was designed to work with 
Olivetti's MP24 PC and will only 
really function properly when 
connected to this machine, as it 
needs a proprietary controller to drive 
it correctly, being a CGA-type 
monitor. The highest resolution it 
could have (there were 2 different 
models) is 512 x 256, which 
wouldn't be particularly good with 
your Amiga. 

Olivetti suggests that your best 
option may well be to advertise your 
monitor for sale in a PC magazine, 
as these monitors do still change 
hands. GW 



SHARED SERIAL PORT 

HA friend and I are 
currently writing a 
multi-user game in 
AMOS. At present we 
can successfully play with two 
users at one time having one on the 
Amiga and one on a terminal in the 
serial port. The question Is, how can 
we have more than one user on the 
serial port, ie we want to have 
about 6-8 incoming lines all on 
modems. I've heard of this sort of 
thing being done on A1500s by use 
of cards but I've never seen or 
heard of such a piece of hardware 
for the A500. 1 hope you have a 
positive answer for this as I don't 
want to have to buy an A1500. 

Matthew Walker 

Reigate 

Surrey 

The Amiga 1500 can do this sort of 
thing with the Commodore A2232 
multi-serial port card, which for under 
£200 gives you 7 more serial ports. 
You may be able to do something 
similar on the Amiga 500 with the 
Ami-Net hardware and software, 
available from Applied Systems and 
Peripherals, allowing you to link many 
Amigas up in a network. It's not fast, 
but it might be ideal for your needs. 
You'll have to work out how to 
program it in AMOS; it may be rather 
tricky without some machine code. 
JR 

PICTURE FORMATS 

I am currently writing 
a graphics program in 
'C and need to know 
the format of bitmap 
and CG font files. It would also be 
nice to know the format for TIFF, 
GIF and other alien picture file 
formats. (I know the IFF ILBM 
format.) 

Could you either briefly tell me 
about the font file formats or about 
any books which would help me to 
make use of them. A general book 
detailing many useful file structures 
(and system structures not detailed 
in the Intuition guides, etc) would 
also be very useful. 

Tobln Darling 

Whlppingham 

Isle of Wight 

Unfortunately the information you are 
after is very extensive, and certainly 
beyond the scope of this reply. Even 
more unfortunately it's also beyond 
the scope of one book! Well, that's 
not entirely true, although to find 
information on TIFF, GIF and other 
foreign picture file formats you will 
need to buy a PC book about this. 
There are a number of publications 
available, some dedicated entirely to 

continued mi page 66 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



AMIGA A600 



THE WILD, THE WEIRD AND THE WICKED PA 




Once again Commodore have put together 
a winning theme pack to complement the 
already popular Amiga A600. 
The Wild, the Weird and the Wicked Pack is 
an ideal starter pack containing a considered 
mix of software making the most of the 
Amiga's amazing capabilities. 
To make this pack a perfect gift INDI have 
added a further four awarawinning games 
and a staggering list of valuable extras totally 
FREE of charge. Also included at no extra cost 
to you are the latest 'Zapsac' carry case and 
Zappo T-shirt. Crucial Amiga accessories. 
Impressed. Who wouldn't be. 



• Amiga A600 single drive 

• Built in TV Modulator 

• 1Mb memory 

• Push Over Silly Putty 

• Grand Prix Deluxe Paint III 

• Mouse and Manuals 



INDI VALUE ADDED FREE 




• Micro Switch Joystick 


£9.99 


• Lockable Disk Box 


£9.99 


• Disk Wallet 


£12.99 


• 10 Blank Disks 


£5.99 


• Kick off 2 Pipemania 

• Space Ace Populous 




£122.59 


• Zapsac Carry Case 


£12.99 


• Zappo T-shirt 


£8.99 


TOTAL 


£183.46 



(HARD DISK) EPIC PACK 



EPIC by name... definitely by content. 
Commodore's talent for pack creation has 
never been better. The software included in 
this pack: EPIC, Rome, and Myth totally 
exploit the stunning features of the Amiga 
AoOO. Add to this Trivial Pursuits language 
lab edition (playable in 3 languages), Amiga 
Text (Wordpro) and the now standard 
graphics package: Deluxe Paint III for 
serious/educational applications and you'll 
start to realise just how dynamic this pack is. 
As with all products supplied by INDI, we 
have added our extra dimension to an 
already incredible offer (see below for IN Dl 
Value Added Pack totally free of charge) 



Amiga A600HD (Hard Disk) 
Built in TV Modulator 
Mouse and Manuals 1Mb Memory 
EPIC, Rome, Myth, Trivial Pursuits 
language lab edition), Amiga Text, Deluxe 
Paint III. 



DESPATCH 



All orders received by 6pm Monday to 
Friday are despatched that day for 
next day delivery using our national 
carrier — Securicor. (UK Mainland only). 
Saturday deliveries are available at a 
small surcharge. If you are out when 
we deliver a card will be left at your 
home giving you a contact telephone 
number to arrange a convenient re- 
delivery. 

Delivery queries can be resolved 
immediately using our on-line 
computer. 

All orders are despatched on a next 
working day delivery basis. Cheque 
orders are despatched immediately oi 
cheque clearance, usually 1 working 
days from receipt. A delivery charge 
of £5.00 is made per item unless 
otherwise stated. 



INDI PRICE 



£470.99 



INDI VALUE ADDED FREE 




• Microswitched Joystick 


£9.99 


• Lockable Disk Box 


£9.99 


• Disk Wallet 


£12.99 


• 10 Blank Disks 


£5.99 


• Kickoff 2 Pipemania 

• Space Ace Populous 




£122.59 


• Zapsac Carry Case 


£12.99 


• Zappo T-Shirt 


£8.99 


TOTAL 


£183.46 



AMIGA 600 



i 



A600 Single Drive 
PACK INCLUDES 

• D. Paint III • Mystery Game 
Plus • Kickoff 2 • Pipemania 

• Space Ace • Populus 

• Zapsac Carry Case 

• Zappo T-Shirt 



INDI] PRICE 




wmi f <;Tnrr<; i a<;t 



1084'S COLOUR/STEREO MONIT 




INPJ PRICE 



£18922 



Commodore's own Amiga Monitor. Designed 
solely for use with the Amiga range of 
computers. With its ergonomic design, 
Hi-res graphics display and stereo sound 
capabilities, the 1084'S will really bring 
your Amiga to life. 



Apart from offering this product at a very 
competitive price INDI are including two 
great software products totally free of charg 



INDI VALUE ADDED FREE 

• Days of Thunder 
(Driving Simulation) 

• Night Breed (or alternative 
exciting game) 




AMIGA CDTV 



TOTAL HOME ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM 



The problem with any new product is that it always takes time for 
everyone to realise its full potential. CDTV is no exception and in 
our opinion everything we have read does a pretty poor job of 
explaining just what CDTV can do and why it is so exciting. 




THE MULTIMEDIA COMPUTER 



THE INDI GUIDE TO CDTV 



AUDIO 

Blues Brothers 

(CO Audio) 02.99 



IT'S A CD PLAYER —Yes, it will play all your Primal Scream, 

Pavarotti, Pink Floyd and any other CD you care to mention in superb 

high quality stereo, with remote infra red control. 

rPS AN AMIGA — Plug in the keyboard, switch on the external disk 

drive and the colossal range of inexpensive Amiga software can be 

used on your CDTV. 

IT'S A MULTIMEDIA SYSTEM -Just imagine, stereo sound, 

images and text all on screen. It asks a question, you respond, it 

reiponds — truly interactive! Each CD disc holds hundreds of 



megabytes of data with instant optical access. The whole of 
Hutchinson's Encyclopedia fits onto 1 disc. This interactive sy 



unique aid for Education, Business or Leisure. The future is here! 



system is a 



GOLDSTAR 14" REMOTE TV/MONITOR 
FEATURED AVAILABLE SEPARATELY AT £179.99 



INDI PRICE 




PACK CONTENTS AS 
STANDARD 

• Amiga CDTV Player 

• CDTV keyboard 

• CDTV 1411 3.5" Disc Drive 

• CDTV Infra red remote 
controller 

• CDTV wired mouse 

• CDTV Welcome Disc 




Manuals 

• Fred Fish CDTV 
INDI VALUE ADDED 

• Lemmings CDTV (£34.99; 

• Blues Brothers (£12.99) 

• Pipemania, Populous, 
Kickoff 2, Space Ace (£122.52) 

I CDTV CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO YOUR TV SET 



Books, magazines and television have long been a source of 
information. CDTV technology combines their qualities and 
makes seeking out that information easy. The CDTV comes 
complete with a Welcome Disk and Fred Fish PD Disc. 

INDI are also adding the addictive Lemmings Game and 
Hutchinsons Encyclopedia totally free of charge. 
PACK AS STANDARD 

Amiga CDTV Player • Infra Red Remote Controller 

Welcome Disk • Fred Fish PD Disk 



INDI VALUE ADDED FREE 

• Lemmings £34.99 Hutchinsons Encyclopedia £49.99 



AMIGA CDTV 



STARTER PACK 




INDI PRICE 



£37922 





If you already own a CDTV or are just about to purchase one you'll be 
pleased to know that INDI stock probably the largest and most 
comprehensive list of CDTV software in the country. Below is a list of top 
selling titles we are offering at very competitive prices. For more details 
please phone our sales team. (Prices include postage). 

EDUCATION 

A Bun for Barney 24.99 

Aslerix Black Gold French I 31 .99 

Asterix Black Gold French II 31.99 

Aslerix Black Gold Spanish I 3 1 .99 

Aslerix Black Gold Spanish 1 1 31.99 

ARTS & LEISURE 

Advanced Military Systems 24.99 

Fruits, Vegetables & Herbs 31.99 

Garden Plants 19.99 

Women in Motion 14.99 

REFERENCE 

Complete works of Shakespeare 24.99 

Guinness World of Records 31.99 

Electronic Cook Book 34.99 

MUSIC 

Karaoke Hits I 14.99 

Karaoke Hits II 14.99 

Music Maker 31.99 



ENTERTAINMENT 




Battle Chess 


34.99 


Classic Board Games 


29.99 


Defender of the Crown 


24.99 


Defender of the Crown 1 1 


29.99 


European Space Simulator 


29.99 


Falcon 


44.99 


Power Pinball 


24.99 


Psycho Killer 


24.99 


Sim City 


24.99 


The Curse of Ra 


24.99 


Tie Breaker Tennis 


24.99 


Trivial Pursuit 


45.99 


Ultimate Basketball 


24.99 


Wrath of the Demon 


24.99 


Xenon 2: Megablast 


24.99 




» nd. i price i £1159-22 



DEALS 

The A1500 is the ultimate home computer for the 

whole family and is designed to cover every 

computing requirement. 

INDI are able to offer you exclusive deals on this 

outstanding product in various configurations and 

bundles (see options on opposite page). 

All configurations come complete with the following 

software and accessories:- 

FEATURES: 

• Fully functional keyboard with numeric pad 
separate from CPU 

• Includes 2x3% " disk drives as standard with 5 Vt " 
Disk Bay. 

• Integral memory and card expansion capabilities 
(most cost effective expansion route) 

• Work bench 2.00 and Kickstart 2.04. 

CONTENTS: 

• Keyboard, mouse, reference manual, Puzznic, 
Toki, Elf (Games), D Paint III (Graphics Package), 
Home Accounts, The Works (Platinum edition: 
Wordpro, Spreadsheet, Database) Joystick 

AMIGA 1500 FEATURED 

(see photograph above) 

• 52 Mb SCSI Hard Disk 

• 1084'S Monitor & Panasonic KX-P2123 24 pin 
colour printer. 
INCLUDED FREE 

Amiga Vision, Nightbreed, Days of Thunder, 
Wordworth Worth £268.99 



Panasonic 



yJlllCt Printing 





We researched the colour printer market in great depth to find a colour printer good enough to cope with Amiga's powerful 

graphic output, yet at an affordable price. 

We found the perfect printer in the Panasonic KX-P21B0+ KX-P2123 quiet printers. 

We then considered that if you were going to buy a Panasonic printer, you would probably need a quality word processing 

package to use with it. We found that too, in 'wordworth', yet at a retail price of £ 1 29.99 we thought that might be a little too 

expensive on top of your printer purchase! So together with Panasonic we decided to give a copy of 'wordworth' free with every 

Panasonic printer. How's that for added value? 




KX-P2T80 





The new Panasonic KX-P2180 9 pin quiet colour printer. 
Produces crisp clear text in mono or in 7 glorious colours with new quiet 
technology. The new KX-P2180 is typically 15dBA quieter in operation, 
than the competition. 

• Fast Printing Speed* 192CPS Draft and 38 
CPSNLQ 

• Colour Printing 7 colour palette (blue, red, 
green, yellow, violet, magenta and black) 

• QuietPrinting Super quiet 45-48dBa sound 
level (most matrix printers are typically in excess 
ofoOdBA) 

• 6 Resident Fonts Over 6,100 type styles 
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continued from page 61 

file formats on the PC. This is likely 
to cost around £20-30. 

The other book you need weighs 
in at a hefty £30, and it is the Amiga 
ROM Kernal Reference Manual: 
Libraries (Edition 3) published by 
Addison Wesley, and available from 
large book stores. It is worth every 
penny and is packed full of useful 
information of the sort you need to 
know. I am not entirely sure what you 
meant by system structures not 
detailed in the Intuition guides, but if 
something is not detailed in the 
official Commodore books, you're 
almost certainly not meant to know 
about it. TS 

NO LUCK WITH COMMS 

I recently bought a 
Supra 2400 Plus 
modem. After 
connecting It up I 
tried using NComm 1.9 to 
communicate with a few BBSs, but 
with no luck. I tried different 
protocols (XModem, ZModem etc) 
with no luck. I tried different baud 
rates and X settings using the AT 
commands, but still no luck. The 
messages I get are - no dial tone, 
no carrier, no answer or busy. 

I even went through the 
problems check in the manual. But 
still no connection. The modem 
seems fine, ie: the TR light on the 
modem Is lit so the terminal Is 
ready. The MR light Is lit so the 
modem is ready. The HS high speed 
2400bps connection Is lit so high 
transfer speed is OK. When I press 
any keys on the keyboard the RD 
and SD (receive data and send 
data) lights flash just as they are 
supposed to do. 

Each time I tone dial or pulse 
dial a BBS the off-hook light flashes 
but the modem does not connect. 
The boards I phoned seem to be 
working from the beeps I hear. I've 
talked to the sysops who advised 
me on the settings required. 

What am I doing wrong? Is It my 
modem, computer's serial port, 
phone line, cable or what? 

Balvinder Bal 
Wolverhampton 

From the sounds of it, you've been 
doing all the right things. The cable 
between modem and Amiga seems 
to be OK because you are able to 
communicate OK with the modem. 
The messages you are getting mean 
exactly what they say. 'No answer' or 
'busy' mean that the other modem 
didn't answer or the line was busy. 
'No dial tone' means that the 
modem couldn't hear the dialling 
tone when it tried to dial. 

There are several things you can 
do. First, turn on the modem's 
speaker and listen as it tries to dial 



HARD DISK FAILURE 

HI have recently purchased an Amiga 1500 with Workbench 
2.04. The computer is fitted with a Quantum 52Mb hard 
disk, controlled by a Nexus board which is fitted with a 4Mb 
RAM expansion. After using the software supplied with the 
Nexus board to Install Workbench on the hard disk, I have come across 
two problems which seem related. Firstly the computer occasionally falls 
to boot up from the hard disk complaining that the IPREFS program failed, 
giving the error code 8000 000B. The second problem is that software 
which has been installed on the hard disk such as Deluxe Paint and 
Wordworth fall to run giving an error message of 8000 0003. Programs 
supplied with the computer such as Blanker and clock also fall with the 
same error code. This is very frustrating as it means that the hard disk Is 
■almost useless. 

Tim Barnett 

Gt Sutton 

South Wirrall 

It sounds like there is some bad software in your system, either a virus or a 
utility that doesn't work under Kickstart 2.04. I suggest you scan your hard 
drive with a recent virus killer, and make sure you have nothing else running 
other than the supplied Commodore software. If this fails I would suggest 
taking the Nexus card and memory back to the place you bought it and have 
it checked out. JR 



out. You should be able to hear the 
dialling tone and then the result after 
the modem has dialled. The tones 
you hear are the same ones you get 
from a normal telephone so you'll 
recognise the engaged tone or hear 
it ringing. 

If the other end doesn't answer 
you'll get a 'no answer' message 
after a while. If it does work, you 
should be able to hear a series of 
screeches, which your modem 
should answer. Once it answers, you 
should be connected. 

If your modem doesn't connect 
properly then reset your modem to 
its default settings and try again 
without changing anything. This 
should let you get a connection of 
some sort. 

Another check you can try is to 
arrange for someone to call you. Set 
your modem to auto answer and then 
when they dial you, the modem will 
answer and you should be able to 
type directly to the person calling 
you. This will prove that the modem 
is working properly. If none of this 
works, I suggest you take the 
modem back and change it for a new 
one. PH 

GHOST DRIVE ICONS 

HI own a Roclite 
external drive (model 
RF332C). Whenever I 
boot up Workbench 
with the drive plugged in I get two 
extra disk icons on the right with 
the description "DF2:BAD" and 
"DF3:BAD" under each icon. I know 
that this particular drive supports 
daisy-chain but as I have no other 
drives attached to it I am baffled as 
to why the two icons appear. I think 
that the problem may He in the 
mountlist but I am not entirely sure. 



Is there a way of getting rid of these 
icons or Is It just something I have 
to put up with? 

Hakan Guleroglu 

Manor Park 

London 

This is a fault with your floppy drive; 
it's probably a bad connection in the 
cabling. Take it back and ask for a 
replacement. You should not get 
DF2.-BAD and DF3:BAD icons on your 
Workbench. JR 

CAPS LOCK FLASHER 

r i ~~ ^j Having been an Amiga 
I 500 Plus owner since 
Christmas, I would 
appreciate your help 



__ 



on the following points. 

a) When I switch the Amiga on, the 
light on the 'Caps Lock' key 
momentarily comes on for about a 
second. Does this mean that my 
keyboard has developed a fault? 

b) We purchased the Amiga plus a 
Philips CM8833-II monitor with the 
product code 10G. After reading 
your July issue, I inspected the 
mains lead supplied and found that 
it has a positive, negative and earth 
line. Does this mean it Is safe? 

c) I have tried unsuccessfully to 
drag the 'Blanker' program on the 
Workbench 2 disk across on to my 
Wordworth program disk but the 
Blanker refuses to run from this 
disk. Why is this? Alternatively, Is ft 
OK to simply switch the monitor off 
If you want to leave a program such 
as a game running? 

John Dorman 

Sevenoaks 

Kent 

a) Don't worry John, the light on the 
caps lock key is supposed to flash 




when the machine is turned on. This 
is simply the Amiga checking to 
make sure that the keyboard is OK. 

b) If your monitor has an earth line, 
then you can be pretty sure that it is 
a full UK-spec unit. As yours does, it 
is perfectly safe. 

c) The Blanker program on the 
Workbench 2 disk runs under 
Commodities Exchange, so you'll 
also have to copy across the 
'Exchange' program and the 
Commodities library in the LIBS: 
directory for the Blanker to work. 
Switching off your monitor whilst the 
machine is still running is perfectly 
safe and will actually protect the 
screen from 'burn in' a lot better 
than the Blanker program. JH 

2ND HAND MONITOR 
BLUES (PART 2) 

I have just acquired a 
Cotron 51 20" 
monitor from a 
second-hand shop 
and although it is probably designed 
for an IBM do you think that it could 
be used with an Amiga? 

I do not have a lead to test it 
with, so could you tell me where I 
could buy one which would connect 
my Amiga 500 to the monitor's 15- 
pin D-socket? 

Peter Conroy 

Llandudno 

Gwynedd 

Here we go again. I'm afraid that 
having a 15-pin connector means 
very little, unless you know how it's 
wired up, which is why you're asking 
me. But no luck this time as I 
haven't been able to track down 
Cotron, so I can't tell you anything 
about this monitor at all. Sorry. GW 

SEGA CONTROLLER 

HI recently inherited a 
Sega Megadrlve 
control pad, and I 
have been trying to 
use the extra buttons to control a 
game I am writing, but the only luck 
I have had is by using the pad In the 
mouse port with joy (o) commands 
for movement and mouse key 
commands for key presses which 
gives me two buttons (B+C) plus 
the four (or eight) directional 
movements. 

Obviously I can't use the 
joystick device in my programs 
because that only reads five pins 
from the joystick, but is there any 
other way I can read the other pins 
by some routine, even if it means 
using assembly language? 

Although using the extra 
buttons on a Megadrive control pad 
might seem like a minor 
programming problem, the ability to 
use a Joystick port for any 
alternative input device, such as a 
lightpen, trackball or paddle could 



66 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



mm. 




have enormous potential in utilities 
and games. I see this as one of the 
only omissions in an otherwise 
excellent utility. 

Andrew Appleton 

Oregon 

USA 

Unfortunately I've been unable to 
find out how the Megadrive controller 
pad is wired up. The information is in 
the Megadrive Hardware Manual, but 
this is only available to registered 
Megadrive developers. 

I doubt any controls other than 
the fire buttons and the directional 
controls can be accessed through 
the Amiga hardware, as the 
mouse/joystick ports are already 
packed with inputs for mice, 
proportional joysicks and light pens. 
JR 

EDUCATION ON THE CHEAP 

I am a lecturer in 
physics and maths at 
a Birmingham Further 
Education college, 
and use my Amiga for the 
preparation of notes and hand-outs. 
Currently, the Further Education 
sector is moving towards the 
provision of open and flexible 
learning packages, which require a 
higher level of presentation than my 
current system - an ancient Amiga 
500 with, believe it or not, 
KindWords - can produce. 

As a result I will be upgrading to 
one of the new generation of 
Amigas when they are released, 
Wordworth and a DTP package - 
probably PageStream. 

Due to the specialist nature of 
my subjects I require scalable 
typefaces giving me the full Greek 
alphabet, mathematical symbols, 
and astronomical symbols. I should 
also mention that the output will 
mainly be from the college's 
PostScript laser printer, and so 
bitmapped fonts are of no use. So 
my questions are as follows: 

a) Can you recommend any 
Compugraphic outline or Adobe 
Type 1 fonts in the public domain? 

b) The best scientific fonts I have 
used were those for the TeX and 
LaTex scientific typesetting 
systems. I have a copy of the LaTex 
MetaFont source code (from Fish 
disks 486 and 487). Do you know of 
any PD program which could 
convert these MetaFonts to 
Compugraphic or Adobe format? 

c) Do you know of any PD utility 
which will convert Adobe Type 1 
fonts to Compugraphic outline fonts 
which can be used with Workbench 
2.x? I know that the new version of 
Professional Page has a utility to do 
this, but I believe that PageStream 
is better suited to my needs. 

ND Tromans 
Birmingham 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Baud - The number of possible changes in state per second on a 

transmission line. For simple protocols such as V21, V22, etc, there are 
only two possible states, so baud rate is equivalent to a measure of bits 
(binary digits) per second. V32 makes use of many more possible states 
and clever coding techniques meaning that many more bits per second 
can be sent at the same baud rate. 

Font - The group of letters, numbers and special characters that comprise 
one variation of typeface, eg: 12pt Times, 12pt Times Bold, 12pt Times 
Italic. 

Icon - A graphical representation of a file. Placing the pointer over an icon 
and double-clicking on the left-hand mouse button will result in the 
corresponding file being opened. 

MHz - Mega-Hertz is a measurement of frequency, meaning millions of times 
per second. Used to measure processor speeds. 

Virus - A small program that can lie hidden in memory or on a disk, 

duplicating itself on to any disks inserted in the machine, and generally 
causing havoc. There are many virus killers available in the public domain 
designed to deal with this menace. 



a) Check out the adverts and speak 
to one of the companies which are 
peddling these PD and shareware 
Compugraphic and Adobe Type 1 
typefaces. There are certainly 
commercial Adobe Type 1 typefaces 
available in the styles you mention. 

b) No. Before you buy PageStream, 
check out the Amiga TeX typesetting 
package, from Industrial Might & 
Logic on 0273 621393. Ask it to 
send you the demo disk, I think you'll 
find it suits your needs better. 

c) No. And there probably never will 
be. To write and distribute such a 
product you'd need a license from 
AGFA, which would cost a pretty 
penny or two. JW 

CLOCKING AROUND 

HI recently replaced my 
68000 chip with a 
10MHz 68010 chip. Is 
there any way of 
running this chip at the full 10MHz 
by disconnecting the 7MHz clock 
and connecting a 10MHz clock 
instead? If I did this, my guess is 
that it would need to be 
synchronised with the rest of the 
system, or would It work as It is? 

Alternatively, I could divide the 
28.6Mhz master clock by three 
using a ripple counter, I would end 
up with a 9.5Mhz clock signal. 
Would this work if I connected It to 
the 68010? 

I have a degree in electronics 
engineering and therefore I am quite 
capable of performing hardware 
surgery, but I don't know the inner 
workings of the Amiga. 

Finally, I have a suggestion. 
How about having a monthly 
publication for the hardware and 
electronic freaks, like myself, 
detailing electronic projects to build 
for the Amiga, eg: memory 
expansions, amplifiers, ROM 



switchers and so on. Also, an article 
about the Inner workings of the 
Amiga would interest plenty of 
people who would like to know how 
the Amiga works. 

Mehmet Dinch 

llford 

Essex 

I am afraid that it is not as easy as 
you suggest to do this sort of 
upgrade. When the 68000 accesses 
various parts of the system bus it 
expects to do so at 7.14MHz. The 
28MHz master clock signal is there 
for the video dot clock, and without 
extensive bus contention logic, 
running the system clock at anything 
other than a direct multiple of 
7.14MHz is nigh on impossible. 
14.28MHz is the easiest to do, and 
a number of PD hardware expansion 
documents are on the BBS networks 
describing how do do this operation, 
although it is known to have some 
unfortunate side effects with some 
hard disks. It involves a 74LS74 to 
halve the 28Mhz clock rate. In 
general, this sort of hardware project 
should be discouraged, as you can 
damage your Amiga quite extensively 
- in the long run it's a lot less hassle 
to buy a proper accelerator - at least 
then you have someone to moan at if 
it does not work correctly. 

An article on the inner workings 
of the Amiga is a good idea, and you 
can expect to see something along 
these lines in the near future. TS 

SCREEN SHOWS RED 

HI recently purchased a 
Kickstart 1.3 ROM to 
upgrade my 1.2 in 
anticipation of 
purchasing a hard disk. After 
installation, the screen flickers for a 
while and settles down to solid red. 
Replacing the 1.2 ROM restores the 



machine to normal operation. The 
machine is otherwise healthy, as is 
the 1.3 Kickstart ROM (tested 
thoroughly in a friend's machine). 
Phoenix of Leeds has been very 
helpful, although it was unable to 
solve the problem, however may I 
congratulate ft on its excellent 
service? 

R Pontefract 
Keighley 
W Yorks 

Well. I'm baffled by this. I've never 
had any problems fitting a 1.3 ROM 
to any Amiga, including really early 
models. All I can suggest is that you 
have some obscure hardware fault 
which you should get one of the 
more reputable repair companies to 
look at. JR 

DISKCOPY PROBLEM 

W A 11 My computer has 
/» I developed the 

following diskcopy 
problem: when using 



the CLI or Shell to duplicate disks in 
DFO:, the computer will read and 
write the first part (the first 40 
tracks) then after I have inserted 
the source disk again and pressed 
return, the computer will abandon 
the diskcopy process with the 
following message... 

Ver'ing 0,79 to go 
Error On Destination Disk 
Verify Error, Diskcopy J 
Abandoned 

I have checked my disks using a 
variety of different boot and file 
virus checkers including John 
Veldthuls' Virus Checker 5.26. 
These did not expose any viruses. I 
have even tried using the CLI and 
Shell from my original Workbench 
disk which, as far as I know, has 
never been write enabled. 

All of the other CLI or Shell 
commands that I use from the 
Workbench appear to be working 
normally. Is there a fault with my 
disk drive or computer? Or is It 
possible that I have missed a virus 
somewhere? 

Steve Jordan 

South Molton 

North Devon 

If you've checked all your disks using 
a variety of different virus checkers, 
then I'm quite sure that you don't 
have a virus. John Veldthuis' Virus 
Checker is one of the most 
dependable virus checker programs 
available (I use it myself), so I'm 
quite sure that it would have 
detected a virus if one were present. 
What I can't quite understand is why 
the Diskcopy operation reads and 
writes the first half of the disk but 
falls over when trying to read the 
second half. If it were a head 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



67 




TAKE IT AT FACE VALUE 

I recently bought a bog-standard Amiga 500 Plus and was 
looking to buy a printer. I have seen adverts for a 
Commodore MPS-1270 InkJet printer In the price range of 
£120-£130 and was wondering your views? Is it value for 
money, considering the fact that It is almost half the price of any bubble 
jet printer I have seen? 

Brian Molloy 
Peterborough 

The MPS-1270 is basically the equivalent of a 9-pin impact dot-matrix 
printer, but it uses jets of ink to print with instead of striking pins against a 
ribbon. 

Because it is 9-pin (or 9-jet if you like), its highest resolution is nowhere 
near that of the 48-pin bubble jets or the Hewlett-Packard DeskJet. And 
there are printer driver problems. The EpsonX[CBM_MPS-1250] driver will 
work with the MPS-1270. but not completely properly. There isn't a proper 
Amiga printer driver for the MPS-1270. 

If you want high quality results, I'd recommend one of the portable 
bubble jets like the Canon BJ-lOex, Star SJ-48 or Brother HJ-100, all of 
which have proper Amiga printer drivers for them. JW 




alignment problem, the diskcopy 
command wouldn't even be able to 
read the first half and you'd find that 
your machine produces read/write 
errors continuously. 

Whatever is going wrong. I think 
that you've definitely got a hardware 
problem there somewhere, so take 
your machine along to a Commodore 
approved service centre and it 
should be able to sort it out for you. 
Sorry I couldn't be of more help. JH 

2ND HAND MONITOR 
BLUES (PART 3) 

I have a second-hand 
Panasonic FST TV 
(TX-2450), which has 
a huge screen, and I 
would like to use ft instead of my 
old Philips 14" monitor. The TV has 
a SCART input, but it won't work 
with my old Philips SCART lead. I 
have no Information on the 
Panasonic, nor a phone number for 
the company, so I don't know 
whether the TV can take an RGB 
input or If I just need a different 
lead. I know I can Just use the 
modulator but then the quality isn't 
particularly good. Can you help? 

Elliott Abbey 

Barnet 

Herts 

Apparently there is a small problem 
with some newer TV/monitors where 
on-screen status displays and other 
switching functions are carried out by 
a single chip which is controlled by 
an external voltage being applied 
through pin 8 on the SCART socket. 
Instead of having the standard 0.5V 
low, 3V high switch, certain sets 
simply blank off the screen when 
more than 0.5V is applied. The fix I 
was told is to put a 150 Ohm 
resistor in series with the voltage 
line to SCART pin 8. 

Panasonic can be contacted on 
0344 862444. GW 



ESCAPE FROM SCRIBBLE! - 
T HE SEQU EL 

W~7 V Your reply in the 
/\ January 1992 issue 

,, to a printer question, 

- entitled 'Escape from 



Scribble!', sounded Just what I 
needed on my Invoices. I followed 
the steps one by one, and now I can 
turn on expanded print, but I can't 
turn it off. What am I doing wrong? 

Second, I cannot get my NEC 
Plnwrtter to print vertically. 
Workbench is set up, but no go. 
Consequently spreadsheets are 
extremely small, having to fit across 
an A4 sheet and not along It. 

Third, your articles last year on 
bulletin boards were very Interesting 
but a cautionary word to your 
readers. I bought a modem, spent a 
while setting it up, and called 
several boards. I took some files 
from one, put them on to another, 
and so on, to gain credits to get 
more files. The games were 
addictive, and I 'talked' to many 
interesting people. 

Result: a phone bill for £889, a 
sold modem, a bank loan, and a 
gleeful BT. 

Please tell your readers that it 
is very easy to run up a massive bill. 
It's no use saying "Just one more 
flle" because even though charges 
are low in the evening, a good file 
takes a while to download, even If 
the phone lines are good. You could 
easily end up paying more for PD 
than If you bought It from a dealer. 
Discipline Is the only answer, I 
found that limiting myself to one 
hour every second day cut the bill. 
The next one was only £320. 

Anthony Mercer 

St Annes 

Lanes 

The secret to cheaper comms, 
Anthony, is indeed discipline -find 
and stick to one or two local bulletin 



boards, and call them between 6pm 
and 8am, and at weekends, which 
works out to about 60p per hour. If 
you go gallivanting all over the 
country, even at cheap rate, it will, 
as you have found out, cost a 
fortune. 

The first phone bill after you first 
get a modem is always the highest, 
after that the novelty wears off and 
you learn to download only those 
files you want, rather than everything 
in sight. I call a bulletin board almost 
every night to pick up messages, and 
my total quarterly bill is rarely more 
than £100, of which £50-£60 is 
comms. 

Now, to your problems. The 
Vertical/Horizontal option in 
Workbench Preferences you are 
playing with is purely for graphics 
dumps. If you want to print 
spreadsheets sideways, you'll need 
special software that, to start with, 
completely redefines the font in the 
printer. This sort of thing takes ages, 
and the results are not usually worth 
it. In fact I don't know of an Amiga 
spreadsheet that'll do it. The real 
solution is to buy a wide-carriage 
printer, or do as you are doing - print 
it in condensed text. 

To turn off expanded text in 
Scribble! you need to send the 
ESC[5w sequence. Look in Appendix 
D-4 of your Amiga manual for a list of 
all the ANSI printer style commands. 
JW 

GAMES ON THE MACHINE 

r~l II Would you please give 

I f\ me your views on the 

following: 
I have a B2000. 1 



use business software, but I also 
like playing games as most people 
do. When the B2000 Is replaced I 
would be Interested in buying the 
new model, however, the new 
machine is likely to be 32-bit, le, 
68020/030 or '040. 

What happens to people who 
wish to upgrade, buy the new 
machine but still run all of their 
games? Would they have to stop 
playing games or have a 16-bit and 
a 32-bit Amiga. 

Mr Robert Hart 

Roehampton 

London 

This is a tough one to answer. 
Commodore has said that it is 
committed to the continued 
development of the Amiga platform, 
and rumours have told us that new 
machines will indeed be 32-bit and 
have enhanced hardware of some 
sort. As to what the specifications of 
these rumoured machines are, your 
guess is as good as mine, and I am 
certainly not able to comment on this 
subject. 

However, the second part to your 
letter is much easier. Older, badly 



written software is likely to break on 
the new machines. This is because 
they are breaking Commodore's set 
down development rules. More 
modem games software is unlikely to 
fail. This is the problem that A3000 
owners faced when they bought their 
machines - suddenly for the first 
time there were Amigas without a 
68000 chip inside and instead fitted 
with a high powered 68030 chip at 
25MHz with a 68882 FPU. This 
caused lots of games to go wrong, 
as they had incorrectly assumed the 
user would have a 7.14MHz 68000 
inside their computer. 

With the continued rise in 
popularity of accelerator cards, 
software houses, especially games 
producers, have had to ensure that 
their software will run, or face a 
seriously reduced market. 

With this in mind, should new 
Amigas appear in the near future it is 
highly probable that the vast majority 
of mainstream games software will 
run. TS 

UNWHOLESOME 
CHARACT ERS 

|U^^' r ^B I have a Panasonic 

"jJR KX-P1081 printer 
n^^^ | using EpsonXold, 
[^,^^H | EpsonX and EpsonQ 
drivers. With my first printer lead 
the printer consistently printed 
characters 32 less than displayed 
on screen, so "S" became "3" etc. I 
decided the lead was faulty and 
bought lead number 2 from a 
different manufacturer. This does 
the same thing, but this time drive 
DF1 will not read a disk while the 
lead is connected. The printer works 
perfectly with my Amstrad CPC and 
Dragon 32. It is connected directly 
to the computer and not via any 
form of switching. 

David Thomas 

Newark 

Notts 

It looks like one or both of the CIA 
(8520) chips in your Amiga are 
blown. You can replace them yourself 
fairly easily (they cost around £15 
each) - but if you're not keen on 
doing that I'd suggest you send it to 
one of the repair companies. JR 

F IXING TH E FUCKER 

r~7 II a) Having recently 
A bought Gold Disk's 

Professional Page 3, 
is it possible to run 



ProPage without the flicker? 
b) My new hard drive (a GVP Impact 
Series 2) instruction book doesn't 
go into much detail on how to copy 
programs and files from disk on to 
the hard drive. How is this best 
done? I have not succeeded in 
installing Personal Finance Manager 
(PFM) even after clicking on the 
■ToHD' hard drive Installation 



JLO AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 



mm. 



MONITOR WARNING! 

Since the buying of second-hand 
monitors (and other equipment) 
appears to be on the increase I 
would advise anyone thinking of 
picking up a "bargain" at an 
auction or second-hand shop to be 
extremely cautious, especially 
when contemplating buying 
something which is either quite 
old or not particularly mainstream 
- especially if it has no manual! 
You may find to your cost that not 
all monitors are created equal and 
you are saddled with a piece of 
worthless junk. You have been 
warned! GW 



program. Can you recommend any 
good books that will make life with 
a hard drive more bearable? 

Keith Richards 
Exeter 
Devon 

a) There are basically two ways you 
can rid your ProPage screen of 
interlace flicker. The first is to click 
on the 'Interlace' option in the pull- 
down menus. This will switch 
ProPage to medium resolution. This 
can be made pemament by adjusting 
ProPage's icon tool types. Simply 
click once on the ProPage icon and 
then select either 'Info' (for Work- 
bench 1.3) or 'Information' (for Work- 
bench 2.0) from the Workbench pull- 
down menus. Find the 'INTERLACE' 
tool type and change it to read 'OFF' 
(the default is 'ON'). Save this new 
setting and ProPage will always boot 
up in medium resolution. 

The second and best, if rather 
expensive, option is to treat yourself 
to an ICD 'Flicker Free' video card for 
your A500 and a multisync monitor. 
This will give you a rock steady 
display in high resolution but will set 
you back around £500. If you can 
justify this sort of outlay, then it'll 
make ProPage far more usable. 

b) I find directory utilities such as 
INOVAtronics' Directory Opus very 
useful for this sort of thing, although 
PD versions (such as SID) will do the 
same job but for considerably less 
cash. Directory utilities allow you to 
travel around the directory structure 
of a disk, copying and deleting files 
without having to get your hands dirty 
with AmigaDOS. JH 

MONITOR CHOICE 

I am considering 
buying a monitor for 
my A500 Plus and 
have narrowed the 
choice down to either the Philips 
CM8833 Mkll or the Protar stereo 
monitor. The decision rests on the 
following criteria: 
a) How superior is monitor display 
when compared to a television? 




b) Do the monitors have horizontal 
and vertical width control? 

c) Do they suffer with discolouration 
when large areas of colour 
(particularly white) are present. I'm 
fed up with this problem on my TV. 

d) Are the two monitors really 
stereo (ie they have two speakers) 
or do they just provide stereo 
through a headphone jack? 

e) Which do you recommend? The 
Protar is supposedly identical to the 
Philips unit. Is this true? 

David Lambert 

Garrowhill 

Glasgow 

a) Monitor display should normally be 
vastly better than TV. 

b) Yes. 

c) If they do, they can only be faulty. 

d) Really stereo. 

e) This question is now just 
academic, since the Protar monitor 
has been discontinued. It was, 
however, simply a rehoused and 
rebadged 8833. GW 

FASTER DTP PRINT-OUTS 

I used to own an 
Amiga 500 but 
recently part- 
exchanged it for an 
Amiga 2000. With that I purchased 
a GVP Internal hard drive and 
PageStream 2.2. 1 also own a 
Hewlett-Packard Deskjet 500C, and 
bought PageStream not only as a 
DTP program but also to drive the 
printer in its full resolution, since I 
have not found a driver to do this. 

I tried the WeServe driver, 
which Amiga Format recommended, 
but it only worked at a resolution of 
75 dots per inch. 

PageStream runs the printer but 
it takes more than 20 minutes to 
print out a full colour page. Would 
an accelerator speed this up, and if 
so, which is the best value for 
money? Also, PageStream prints out 




JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



GIF - Graphics Interface Format is a file format used for storing pictures so 
that they can be transferred between different computers and, 
particularly, so that they can be transmitted across computer networks. 

Interlace - A method used to double the apparent vertical resolution of the 
monitor by alternately refreshing the screen at a vertical offset, 
squeezing an extra line between each of the lines of a normal screen. 

RAM disk - An area of memory that is treated as if it were a floppy disk. The 
advantage is that files can be stored and retrieved much more quickly, 
though all information is lost when the power is switched off. 

RGB - Red Green Blue is a standard for video signals that provides better 
quality than composite or Radio Frequency signals. 



the picture very darkly. I can find no 
way to alter that. Is it possible to 
after this, and if not, do you know of 
any printer drivers which will drive 
the printer in its full resolution? 

J Crabtree 
Read 
Lanes 

An accelerator certainly would speed- 
up print-outs - with a 68030 your 20 
minutes should come down to five 
minutes or less. But even a 68020 
accelerator will dramatically increase 
the speed of your machine, and one 
of the best bargains at the moment - 
under £400 - is the Commodore 
2620 card for the Amiga 
1500/2000. Speak to Almathera 
Systems on » 081-683 6418. 

To get clearer print-outs from 
your Deskjet 500C you need 
TurboPrint Professional 2, which 
allows you to alter the 'colour 
correction' so that colours on paper 
print nearer to those on screen. Alas, 
Turboprint Professional and 
PageStream don't work together very 
well, so this combination will not 
enhance your desktop publishing, 
although it works wonderfully with 
paint programs and word processors. 
JW 




NO MORE DISK SWAPPING 

^H I am considering purchasing a Supra RAM expansion with 
4Mb on board, thus giving a total of 5Mb of RAM (my A500 
already has a Zydec 512K trapdoor expansion). What I 
want to know Is whether it Is possible to load two or 
possibly even three disk games completely Into RAM, therefore 
eliminating the hassle of having to swap disks continuously. My buying 
decision hinges on your answer to this question, so I would be grateful for 
your help. 

Alan Lamberton 
Barrhead 
Glasgow 

Unless the game comes with some form of hard disk installation software 
(you can treat the RAM disk as a hard drive for this sort of thing), it is 
impossible to transfer the contents of multidisk games to RAM and expect 
them to work, mainly due to the copy protection that software houses use. 
Some games are specifically written to take advantage of extra RAM 
(Interceptor is a good example of this), although this rarely cuts down on 
disk swapping - all you usually get are enhanced sound effects and 
graphics. JH 




MINISCRIVE DRIVE 

Please could you tell 
me whether it is 
possible to fit a 
Minlscribe 3650 hard 
disk to my A2000? 

a) If a card for it is obtainable, 
where can I get one? 

b) Will it work with an IBM ST506 
controller fitted to my Amiga - if so, 
where can I get the drivers and low 
level formatter for It? 

Andrew Clark 
Bishops Stortford 

The only card that you can use to 
control the Miniscribe drive in your 
Amiga 2000 is the (now obsolete 
and no longer produced) Amiga 
2090A controller from Commodore. 
It's really horrible to set up and you'll 
find the drive unreliable and slow. 
Drop it out your window. JR 

PICTURE EXCHANGE 

I have an Amiga 
which I use for 
digitising pictures 
with Dlgl View 4 Gold. 
My problem is that I swap digitised 
pictures with my friend who has a 
PC. I use MessySid to place my 
pictures on his PC formatted disks, 
in IFF format, which he then 
converts to GIF. Is there a program I 
can use on the Amiga to convert 
GIF to IFF? 

DA Lawton 
Redcar 

There are several commercial 
programs, including ASDG's Art 
Department. Black Belt's 
Imagemaster and also Rasterlink. 
which all include GIF-IFF conversion 
among their functions, but as well as 
being expensive it would be like 
cracking a nut with a sledghammer. 

PD-wise, there's a program 
called WASP123 (or a variant of this) 
which is a CLI driven utility that can 
convert several variations of GIF to 
assorted IFF formats, and it works 
just fine. But with only 2Mb of 
memory on your Amiga you might still 
find the going tough, especially with 
larger files. GW 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



VIDEO 



Control 

our 




SCRIPTING 



pictures, 
animations, 
wipes, sound, text, 
music and interactive 
presentations and a whole lot 
more with Director 2, Plus: Gary 
Whiteley's guide to chroma keying 
with RocKey 



To tell you the truth, 
The Director version 
2 isn't a new 
product. In fact, as 
software goes It's quite an 
old dog (I don't mean that 
unkindly). But Director 2 is 
unique, for, as well as 
having many tricks that 
remain unsurpassed, It also 
offers the user a high return 
for his Investment - in 
terms of cost and effort. The 
reason I'm giving it space is 
that I don't recall reading 
much about ft and I think that's a 
shame. If you need precise control 
over your audio-visual productions, 
animations and interactive 
presentations and you can't get it 
with your current programs, try 
Director 2 - you'll like it. 



KTll <^^^^^^B 


ECONOMIC 

0EOI.0GY 

■ 
■ 





• •/* * •* • ■ 


Ieconomic 
' geoixxiy 




fl 








1 ■ 


IHr 


^d ^B 


■ ■ 




'■'■' "^B 











And if OIL was chosen this is what 
you would see. Clicking on various 
oilfields will produce further textual 
information by activating irregular 
shaped buttons 



My geological master map, part of 
the example script, produced with 
DPalnt III. Click In a selection box 
and the result pops on to screen... 

Like its predecessor, The 
Director, you are required to produce 
written scripts using 
Director's own easy-to-follow 
language. 

These scripts look much 
like Basic programs and all 
the elements of Basic 
programming are 
incorporated. But Director 2 
is much easier to use than 
its forerunner because of 
several new utility programs, 
which take the drudgery out 
of more complicated 
processes. 

Although scripting may not 
be everyone's idea of a 
simple user interface there 
is no doubt that it increases Director 
2's flexibility enormously, letting the 
user define what happens, how it 
happens and when - in a style which 
suits him. 



Director 2 has a built-in text 
editor called DEdit which is used 
for writing scripts. Although any 
text editor can be used, the 
advantage of DEdit is that 
calls to other Director programs, 
such as the Blit and Button 
Utilities or Director 
Libraries can be made, 
as well as directly 
running the current 
script. 

Scripts can be as 
simple or 
complex as the 
user requires. A 
simple slide show 
may consist of nothing 
more than commands to 
load and display a series 
of pictures from disk, 
whereas an interactive 
presentation with hot 
keys, mouse control, 
animation, picture blittlng, sound, 
text and multiple backgrounds 
could be 100 lines plus in length. 
With such a wide range of 
options it's well worth sketching 
out a battle plan on paper before 
hitting DEdit. Forward planning, flow- 
charts and modular scripting will 
assist in clarifying your work, helping 
you achieve results faster, reduce 
redundant or duplicate code and 
ease debugging chores. 

Once scripting commences, it's 
likely that you'll occasionally need 



help from the manual to get the best 
out of the Director 2's features. I 
found it well written and helpful and 
even a novice should be able to learn 
quickly. It has an abundance of 
example scripts and code fragments 
and covers all the features of 
Director 2 in great detail. 
Supplementing the manual are 




The chooser screen of an animation 
player. The chosen animation will 
load from hard disk and loop until 
returned to the chooser. I also built 
in a keyboard-driven speed control 

around 40 fully-working examples 
and utilities which can be examined, 
adapted and incorporated into the 
users' own scripts. 

To ease the chore of scripting, 
Right Answers has thoughtfully 
supplied several utilities to take the 
strain out of making on-screen 

continued on page 73 



FEATURES & USES 



Director 2 can handle: 

• IFF pictures and animations, including chaining anims together 

• Text files and fonts, with embedded formatting 

• Drawing functions 

• Picture blitting, sprites and animbrushes 

• Polygon morphing and brush path design 

• ARexx 

• Mathematical Functions (including sine & cosine) 

• IFF sound samples, SMUS music files and MIDI 

• Picture to picture transitions - including custom wipes 

• Keyboard and/or mouse operations 

• On-Screen buttons - including colour and irregular shapes 

• Palette manipulation 

• Strings and arrays 

Here are a few things that Director 2 can be used for: 

• Compile animations through scripts 

• Make interactive presentations with control via mouse and/or 
keyboard 

• Build archiving systems for pictures, animations or sounds with speed 
and volume controls 

• Synchronise samples and music to animations and slide shows 

• Use custom wipes for transitions between pictures 

• Data presentation 

• Writing customised software for many applications, including games, 
educational aids, point-of-sale displays, information screens etc 

• Setting paths for brushes to follow on screen 

• Automated drawing routines 



TA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 



VIDEO 




1 Take one (tall and ugly) presenter 
and put him in front of a blue 
background... 

2 Next load the graphics that you 
prepared earlier... 

3 Mix the two together using the 
Rockey and serve up to video tape 
while still hot 



E 



veryone knows how to put 
Amiga graphics over video 
- you use a genlock, right? 
But how do you reverse the 
effect and put video In front of an 
Amiga graphics? By using a keyer, 
or even better by using a chroma 
keyer, like the new RocKey from 
RocTec. 




Easy to connect and easy to use, it's 
the RocKey chroma keyer 

Before you start screaming that 
£299 is a lot of money, consider that 
until the advent of the RocKey there 
hadn't been such a low-cost chroma 
key unit for the Amiga/video user - 
and especially one aimed at the 
lower end of the market. 

But even at this price there's a 
catch - the only thing that the 
RocKey can do on its own is work as 
a colour splitter for video digitising. 
To perform the rest of its tricks it 
needs a partner - a genlock. So 
keeping it totally RocTec, and since 
they were obviously styled and 
designed to work together, I hooked 
a RocGen Plus up to the RocKey for 
my tests. 

By running the two units together 
a whole range of keying and 
genlocking effects can be generated 
- from pure chroma keying and 
normal genlocking to some special 
combinations such as Graphics 
Window, Key Sandwich and Key Thru, 
which I'll cover later in the article. 

GETTING STARTED 

Hooking up the equipment is easy 
enough and the instructions provided 
are very clear and helpful, though the 
example illustrations are rather 
vague. One point though - do make 
sure that you use proper 75 Ohm 
video cable for your connections, as 



audio-type cable will almost certainly 
cause quality problems. 

Any composite video source is 
suitable for use with the RocKey, so 
cameras, VTRs, laser disks and still 
video cameras (such as the Canon 
Ion) would all be OK. Although the 
RocKey requires external power a 
nice feature is that it will 
automatically switch on or off 
according to whether or not the 
host Amiga is powered up, which 
should please users with weak 
Amiga power supplies. 

COLOUR SPLITTING 

The operation of the RocKey is 
based on colour splitting techniques 
to first separate and then mix the 
RGB components of the video 
image with Amiga graphics, via a 
genlock. By controlling the amount 
of each colour component and the 
mixing mode, a variety of special 
effects become possible. A direct 
benefit of using colour splitting is that 
owners of monochrome digitisers can 
make use of the RocKey's splitter 
output to grab colour images from a 
suitable video source. 



ROCKEY IN USE 

The RocKey is controlled through a 
combination of switches and fader 
knobs on the front of the unit, and 
with nine basic permutations there is 
plenty of scope for experimentation. 



"The RocKey can be 

used to chroma key 

practically any 

colour" 



For instance, a basic chroma key 
requires both the Chroma and Blue 
buttons to be selected, with fine 
tuning being made with the red and 
green controls once the blue level 
has been determined. Surprisingly 
though, you are almost left to figure 
out that the red and green controls 
can also be used for setting the 
main key colour, instead of blue, and 
in fact combinations of colours are 




possible. This means that the 

RocKey can be used to chroma key 

practically any colour, not just blues. 

In fact there is a table of switch 

settings in the back of the manual 

but it isn't 

really 

obvious why 

it's there. 

Although 

the 

RocKey's 

main 

function is 

obviously 

its chroma 

keying, this 

doesn't 

mean that 

its other 

operations 

are just afterthoughts. Far from it. 

Under the right circumstances Luma 

keying, which replaces areas of 

selected brightness within the video, 

can be as effective as the more 

complex Chroma keying method. For 

more on these two 

methods of keying, 

turn to the boxout on 

page 72. 

Novel effects are 
possible by defining 
which colour is to be 
the key colour (either 
in the video or 
graphics, depending 
on requirements) and 
in what order the 
keying takes place. 
So it can be possible 
to define a selected 
video colour to 



2 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



71 



VIDEO 



become a 'keyhole' through which 
Amiga graphics appear (Key Window), 
or produce an effect where some 
portions of the Amiga graphics will 
be in front of the video image, while 
others will be behind. 

One of the effects which can be 
produced, the Key Sandwich, is 
demonstrated to particularly good 
effect in the RocKey video by keying 
live video of a person over an 
animated logo which spins around 
both in front and behind his head, 
while he follows the logo with his 
eyes. 

THE KIT 

In addition to the genlock mentioned 
previously in this article, a few other 
things are also needed to get the 
best from the RocKey. 

Probably the main requirement is 
a space where a blue backdrop can 
be set up, large enough to 
accommodate whatever the subject 
is you wish to key. You could use a 
blue cloth for a backdrop unless you 
want a permanent key area - in 
which case it may be worthwhile 
taking time to paint the area. 

Next you will need adequate 
lighting to both illuminate the subject 
and flatten out shadows on the 
backdrop. A video camera and 
monitor will also be indispensable, 
plus a VCR to save the final key 
mixes to video tape. 



PROBLEMS 

I found it impossible to get a full 
overscan screen, but I think this may 
have been the fault of the RocGen I 
had, so don't worry too much about 
this if you are contemplating buying a 
RocKey. 



RGB 



degree of fringing around the key 
subjects which could be minimised 
but never completely removed. The 
output from a video camera was 
definitely superior. 

THE DOCUMENTATION 

There's a slim manual provided 
which is 



to 



SPLITTER OUT 



RocKey 



AMIGA RGB 



AMIGA 



RocGen Plus 



VIDEO 



Connecting the RocKey isn't as 
difficult as it looks 

Remember that when using any 
video equipment which requires 
external video for synchronisation 
(such as genlocks and keyers), the 
results are dependent upon the 
quality of that signal. Give 'em junk 
and that's what you'll get back. 
When keying off tape there was a 



certainly 
instructive, 
but far 
more 
useful is 
the video 
tape which 
RocTec, in 
common 
with several 
other 
manufact- 
urers, have 
bundled 
with the 
RocKey. 
As 
well as 
explaining the effects the RocKey 
can produce, and how to hook 
together and use the whole system, 
it demonstrates what an awful taste 
in background music some people 
have. And being an American 
production it also turns out to be 
quite a good demo of the Video 
Toaster as a production tool, for 
those who may be curious. 



ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 



RocKey 

by RocTec Electronics 

Available from: 

HB Marketing Ltd, Unit 3, 

Poyle 1 4, Newlands Drive, 

Colnbrook, Berks 

SL3 0DX 

» 0753 686000 



,£299 




VCR 



Overall rating 



iu 



Keying is a common effect nowadays - 
you'll see It on TV, commercials, pop 
videos, on the news and on weather 
forecasts. Keying is used to place 
people In front of exotic Imagery, as a special 
effect, or when adding graphics to a picture. It's a 
technique used universally by broadcasters and 
home enthusiasts alike. But how does it work? 

The simplest definition of keying is that by 
using an electronic device (a Keyer) it is possible to 
replace a defined portion of one image with an 
entirely new one. Like a plain studio background 
being replaced with a picture of the Kremlin, for 
instance. But surely this is what a genlock does? 
Not quite. It's true that graphics can be overlaid on 
video by using a genlock - which is performing a 
keying effect - but a genlock cannot insert a video 
image in front of graphics, which is where a video 
keyer like the RocKey comes into its own. 

There are two types of keying - known as Luma 
and Chroma (Luminance and Chrominance). 

LUMA KEYING 

Luma Keying is based on the brightness of an 
image, the Luminance Signal being that which 
determines the brightness (or tone) at each point in 
a video picture. By selecting a brightness level to 
use as a key setting it is possible to produce a key 
pattern which can be any single brightness from 
white at one extreme to black at the other. A 
simple Luma key might be a false window in a 
studio set which is 'glazed' with white panels. If the 
luma keyer is set to white then a 'hole' will be 
produced in the video image where the white 
panels are which can then be filled with another 



picture, such as an exterior. Although relatively 
simple and cheap to produce, the disadvantage of 
Luma keying is that it is not fussy about which 
portion of a picture is dealt with so long as it is at 
the selected brightness. So in my example a 
performer in a dark suit and white shirt in front of 
the window would also have the exterior image 
showing through his shirt, which is going to look 
rather odd if the production is a period drama 
rather than science fiction. Even though careful 
lighting can improve the scope of Luma keying, it 
will always exhibit this problem. 

CHROMA KEYING 

However, by employing Chroma Keying it is possible 
to target a specific colour in a scene, rather than a 
brightness. This increases the flexibility of the 
keyer since it can be fine tuned to a specific hue, 
which could in fact be any single colour, though the 
most often used is a bright royal blue which is 
usually called Chroma Blue in the trade. The reason 
that blue is chosen is that it is one of the few 
colours which isn't a component of the colour of 
human skin, meaning that a presenter's face or 
hands will key cleanly. Of course there could be 
problems with blue eyed people, and clothes must 




CHECKOUT 
RocKey 



Documentation • • • • C 

Simple but thorough, and when used in 
tandem with the demo tape you should be 
off to a brisk start. 

Features • • • • O 

RocKey has a wide range of controllable 
options for keying effects, plus a colour 
splitter. 

Quality • • • O O 

Keying can be a little noisy and fringed, 
but it is VHS-oriented, so maybe I'm being 
a little lough here. 

Price Value • • • • O 

Currently the cheapest of its kind. 



For all-round VHS/composite use the 
RocKey could be a useful addition to your 
video hardware. 




be carefully chosen, but Chroma keying can 
produce more selective results than luma keying. 
Scenes destined for either variation of keying 
should be both well and evenly illuminated, with as 
few shadows as possible. If a scene is to be done 
as a. long shot it may well be impossible to provide 
a large enough background to fill the frame - in 
which case a suitably coloured mask may be 
attached to the camera in order to cut out 
undesired objects such as lighting rigs. 

CAMERA VERSUS TAPE 

It is better to Chroma key directly off camera 
wherever possible because this will provide the 
cleanest (least processed) signal and hence suffer 
less visible degradation problems, fuzzy edges and 
breakup. In fact, optimum quality would be 
achieved by feeding an RGB video signal from 
camera or tape directly into a compatible keyer, 
cutting out the coding and subsequent decoding to 
and from RGB to composite or component video. 
But such RGB outputs are uncommon, especially in 
the domestic/VHS oriented environments the 
RocKey is aimed at. Using a camera or VTR 
composite output obviously keeps the costs down, 
but the quality tends to be compromised. 



VA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 



VIDEO 



DIRECTOR 2 - EXAMPLE PROGRAM 



This program Incorporates a pre-defined set of buttons which were set up 
using Director 2's Button Utility. These are used to enable a mouse click 
to cause a subroutine to be activated, such as showing additional 
Information when a menu box Is selected. When a material is chosen from 
the Key a new map will appear and further Information will become 
available. This script Is intended only as an example and while It Is fully 
tested and working It is not completely finished. 

REM INTERACTIVE PRESENTATION OF BRITISH GEOLOGICAL FEATURES 

rem by Gary whiteley 

INCLUDE "URbuttons" :REM utilise pre-nade Buttons file - these J 

include Coal, Oil, Gas, CoalText, Northumbrian, Morelnfo and Exit Info. 

MODULE "DH2:Director2/Director /modules/sound" :REM load sound module 

DIM textdata[1000] :REM dimension textdataS array 

ABORT 2 :REM Set program exit to be on any keypress only 

SOUND "LOAD", 1, "DH2:director2/tutorial/sounda/mousenoiBe": J 

REM sound sample 

LOAD 1, "DH2:Director2/UKmastermap" :REM Load main image 

COPY 1,3 :REM Copy Main Map to buffer 3 for blitting 

DISPLAY :REM display UK mastermap 

DRAWMODE :REM Draw only with foreground pen 

MARGINS 500,630 :REM define margins for text 

LOADFONT 1, 18, "Times. font" :REM Use Times font, size 18, from font dir 



PEN 0,3 

PEN 1,1 

/top: 

GETMOUSE x,y 
DO Playsound 



:REM set background pen to palette colour 3 (blue) 
:REM set foreground pen to palette colour 1 (white) 



:REM check for mouse key press & return co-ords 
:REM Play sample on mouse key press 

DO UKButtons,x,y,l :REM Use co-ords to activate selected button 

GOTO top :REM if nothing happens keep looping 

/Coal: REM Load COAL image when COAL button in Key is selected 

Xal :REM set a flag for later 

LOAD "DH2 :Di rector 2 /UKCoal" :REM load new image 

DISPLAY :REM display new image 

GOTO top :REM go back to /top: and wait for next mouse press 
/Oil: REM Load OIL image 

X.2 

LOAD "DH2: Director2 /UKOil" 

DISPLAY 

GOTO top 
/Gas: REM Load GAS image 

X-3 

LOAD "DH2:Director2/UKGas" 

DISPLAY 

GOTO top 
/Morelnfo: REM Place additional information when button is selected 

IF X=l THEN DO Coaltext :REM Activate Coaltext subroutine 

IP X=2 THEN DO Oiltext 

IP X=3 THEN DO Gastext 

GOTO top 
/Exit Info: REM Restore menu when info box is exited 

BLIT 3,494,76,494,76,136,428 :REM Blit menu area back on screen 

GOTO top 
/Playsound: REM Play sample when mouse key is pressed 

SOUND "PLAY",1 

RETURN 
/Coaltext: REM DiBplays general text if Morelnfo is selected. 
textdata$="lp01COAL USE Ir2 Since 1990 the use of coal in the UK has J 
halved, and many British collieries have been closed down." J 
:REM This is made up text with embedded formatting codes. 

DO TextBox :REM Use TextBox subroutine to save coding 

GOTO top 
/Northumbrian: REM Displays text if Northumbrian coalfield is J 
selected. 

textdata$=" IpOlThe Northum- brian coalfield is the largest subsea J 
coalfield in the UK." :REM Text with embedded single letter spacing 

DO TextBox 

GOTO top 
/Oiltext: REM Not finished yet 

MOVE 500,100: textdata$="OIL USE" 

DO TextBox 

GOTO top 
/Gastext: REM Not finished yet 

MOVE 500,100: textdata$="GAS USE" 

DO TextBox 

GOTO top 
/TextBox: 

PEN 1,3 



:REM Current colour blue 



RECT 494,76,630,504 :REM Blank out selector 



:REM Use Times font 
:REM Current colour white 
:REM Move cursor to 500x, lOOy 
:REM Write relevant text from cursor position 
RETURN :REM Continue right after last issued DO TextBox command 
REM Program exits when any keyboard key is pressed 



SETFONT 1 
PEN 1,1 
MOVE 500,100 
FTEXT 0, textdataS 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Blitting - Partial screen flipping by transferring a rectangular area of a 
picture held in a hidden buffer to the picture currently being displayed. 
Improves display speed by reducing data overheads. 

Buffer - A portion of memory temporarily designated for data storage. 

Double Buffering - Used to prepare the next image in a hidden buffer while 
the current one is being displayed. A quick flip to the hidden buffer is all 
that's needed to keep the animation smooth and sleek. 



OTllwid from page 70 

buttons or setting up blit routines, as 
well as other functions. Now, the Blit 
utility can be used to define the 
areas to be blitted and then export a 
complete blit command to the script 



4-colour med res. This innocuous 
looking screen Is the key to making 
easy buttons with Director 2 

- a great time and effort saver. 
Likewise, buttons can be determined 
and incorporated into a script, as in 
the example on the left. Libraries for 
wipes, anim construction and sound 
playback can also be coerced into 
the script just as easily. 

By scripting in a modular fashion 
it's easy to make tests at various 
stages to ensure that all is going 
smoothly. When the script is run it is 
compiled into a .FILM file which is 
played back using the Director's own 
freely distributable Projector 
program, so that self-running disks 
can also be made of the completed 
work. If for some reason your script 
won't run, D/rectorwill return you to 
the editor and the offending script 
line will be indicated so that 
debugging becomes easier. 

To be on the safe side I tested 
Director 2 with a genlock and I had 
no problems - locking was clean and 
stable. I did have one system 
problem when using the DOS 2.04 
startup-sequence: Director 2 didn't 
want to know, even though it is 
supposed to be v2 compatible. 
However, the trouble went away 
some time later so I assume that 
something in my system was causing 
the trouble, not Director 2. 

SUMMING UP 

While Director 2 doesn't offer the 
ease of use of programs with neat 
graphic interfaces such as Scala, 
Hyperbook or AmigaVision, which are 
probably its nearest 'competitors', it 
does have a scope which eclipses 
both Hyperbook and AmigaVision for 
flexibility. Against Scala 1.1 Director 



















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2 pales on many points, especially 
wipes, text handling and ease of 
use, but it still holds its own where 
many of its unique functions are 
concerned - sound, maths, array and 
string handling, palette manipulation, 
irregular buttons, blit control, 
and so on. And it is cheaper. 
Some of the other features 
I liked include the Polygon 
utility's simple method of 
making paths to move 
objects along; the Convert- 
Anim wipe generator, which 
takes a two colour animation 
and produces a custom wipe 
pattern; the mouse and 
keyboard control; and the 
embedded text formatting functions. 

NEXT MONTH 

I'll be taking a look at Centaur/Opal 
Tech's OpalVision, a true colour 
graphics board that, once expanded, 
promises to deliver Video Toaster- 
like features for PAL users. 

Gary Whiteley can be e-malled as 
drgaz@CIX. compullnk.co. uk 



ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 



The Director Version 2.... 

by Right Answers Inc 
Available from: 
Alternative Image, 
6 Lothair Road, 
Leicester, LE2 7QB 
= (0533)440041 



. £99.99 




CHECKOUT 

The Director 2 



Documentation • • • • • 

Very thorough, with plenty of specimen 
programs, tutorials and working examples 
on disk to refer to and modify. 

Features • • • • O 

More than any other presentation program. 

Usability • • • O O 

Programming might put off the script-shy, 
but that would be a shame. 

Price Value • • • • O 

So flexible it has to be good value. 



Overall rating 



iO 



For those hard-to-get-at problems Director 
2 beats the rest. It may not have an 
elegant interface, but it opens doors other 
programs don't even have! 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



Jeff Walker gives his typing fingers a rest and learns to love being 
lazy with Migraph optical character recognition 





o 



ptical character 
recognition (OCR) is 
one of computing's 
success stories. While 
the boffins continue to say "real 
soon now" about things like virtual 
reality, artificial intelligence and 
speech recognition, OCR technology 
has quietly reached such a level of 
speed and accuracy that it can be 
used with confidence to transfer all 
kinds of printed material on to disk. 

This success has largely been 
due to a shift in the way the software 
recognises characters. Early OCR 
software employed a method called 
'matrix-matching'. After the text had 
been digitised by scanning, each 
character was stored in memory as a 
matrix of dots - a 'raster image' to 
give it a technical name - very much 
like an Amiga bitmapped font. But 
the matrix had to be the same size 
for every character, so only 
documents that contained non- 
proportional typefaces could be 
recognised. These are typefaces 
where each letter takes up the same 
width, like the 






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Using a hand scanner to scan direct into Migraph OCR 
you can scan sideways (landscape) and have the 
software rotate the image automatically 



number '0'? I 
know, says the 
context sensitive 
software, let's look 
at the character 
directly to the left. 
Is it a letter? No. Is 
it a number? Yes. 
OK, and what 
about the 
character on the 
right, is that a 
number too? Yes. 
Ah, then the odds 
are that this is a 
zero because you 
don't often get the 
letter '0' between 
two numbers. 
This technique 



standard output 
from a dot-matrix 
printer or 
documents 
produced on 
typewriters. 

The software 
would try to match 
a digitised 
character with every 
character it had in 
its database, pixel by pixel, row by 
row, keeping a count of the 
discrepancies between it and every 
character on file. Then it would 
select the character that had the 
fewest discrepancies. 

MEMORY, TIME & MONEY 

It took a lot of memory, and you had 
to have a character database for 
every typeface you wanted to digitise. 
And it took a lot of time. Often it was 
quicker to type it in yourself - or 
cheaper to pay someone else to type 
it in - than buy an OCR package. 

And you couldn't OCR text that 
had been typeset - books, magazine 
articles and so on - because the text 
was proportionally spaced. 

The invention that revolutionised 
OCR is called 'feature analysis'. This 
works by analysing the features of 



"Headings, 
subheadings and 
footnotes can be 
read in one go" 



characters - how many horizontal, 
diagonal and vertical lines each has 
and whether those lines end at the 
top, bottom, left or right; how many 
curves and whether those curves are 
facing left or right, or a closed curve. 
The letter 'D' for example could 
be described as 'one vertical line on 
the left, one closed 
curve facing left'. 
This simple 
description fits the 
letter 'D' printed in 
umpteen typefaces. 
In fact there's more 
to a character 
description than 
this, but you can 
see the general 
idea. Using feature 
analysis, proportionally spaced and 
professionally typeset text can be 
read, as well as text of any size - so 
pages with headings, subheadings 
and footnotes can be read in one go. 

Strictly speaking, to work 
'faultlessly' the software needs to 
have a recognition library for each 
style of type you are going to feed it, 
but in theory the ability to recognise 
the difference between the two major 
type styles, serif and sans-serif, 
would be enough to be going on with. 
Even then feature analysis can be 
fooled by characters that have 
identical descriptions - the letter '0' 
and the number '0' for example. 
Which is where another bit of jargon 
comes in: 'context sensitive'. 

Say the OCR software comes 
across a 'one closed curve' 
description. Is it a letter '0' or a 



can become quite sophisticated. For 
instance, in the English language you 
never get the letter 'p' following the 
letter 'q', so if this character 
sequence is what the OCR software 
thinks it has seen, the context 
sensitive part can tell it to think 
again. So it trundles off and looks in 
a dictionary. If it still can't make 
sense of it all, then ultimately it can 
present the problem to the user and 



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The next step is to draw clip boxes around the three text 
areas to be OCRed 



a comprehensive context sensitive 
system, a large dictionary (or 
'lexicon' as computerised 
dictionaries tend to be called), and a 
good training system that allows 
'user dictionaries' to be created, 
almost any printed document should 
be transferable from paper on to disk 
with very few mistakes. Out of 100 
characters transferred, at least 98 or 
99 should be correct. 

At the end of the day, this level 
of accuracy is the yardstick by which 
any OCR software must be 
measured; even an accuracy level of 
90 per cent is not enough because it 
can take longer to find and correct 
10 mistakes out of 100 characters 
than it would a trained typist to type 
the 100 characters correctly by hand. 

MIGRAPH OCR 

First, the words that throw fear into 
every Amiga owner's heart, what are 
the dreaded 'system requirements'? 
You require a hard drive because 
when Migraph OCR runs out of 
memory it will use the hard drive to 
'cache' data, and the size of the 
data that needs to be cached can 
quite feasibly exceed the storage 
capacity of a 
floppy disk. The 
back of the box 
says a minimum 
of 2.5Mb is 
required, but like 
most memory- 
intensive 
programs, the 
minimum 
requirement 
means it'll run, 
but you won't be 
able to do very 
much. If you have 
just 2.5Mb of 
memory and you 



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ask him or her to sort it out. 

This part of OCR is called 
'training'. You tell the program that 
the character is really an 'a' - it 
could have looked like a 'p' because 
there was a smudge on the paper, or 
because the 'a' in that typeface is of 
a weird design. In the latter case you 
can tell the software to remember 
the description of that character, and 
the next time it sees something that 
matches - assume it is a letter 'a'. 

With well-written feature analysis 
software, a few recognition libraries, 



are using Migraph OCR to do the 
scanning (using a hand scanner, 
more about this later) then after the 
program has loaded you will have 
enough memory left to scan a 4in by 
6in area at 300 dots per inch (dpi). 
The same goes if you are importing 
pages (ILBMs) that have been pre- 
scanned - no way can a 300 dpi (or 
greater) scan of even half an A4 
page be imported. 

With 3Mb of total memory you 
can use Migraph OCR and a hand 
scanner to read in the maximum 4in 



74 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



Z^ bmmimviMM 



93c—™- 



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move. Commodore will 

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that Me could afford the drop and the first return ra 
the (1689. showing at less than one per, cent nade it 
The A688HI> vill renain at £499. S unner expl ained that 

of hard d nues nakes a reduction t rnjimrtni 



prnpossibla 



The Interactive Learning requester will ask you to clarify 
any unrecognised characters. Here the small glitch to 
the left of the 'm' has confused the software, so I 
replace the '.' in the gadget with an 'm' 

by 14ln area at either 300 or 400 
dpi, and a 300 dpi pre-scanned full 
A4 page can be imported -just. If 
you want to handscan landscape 
(sideways) and have the software 
rotate the scan by 90 degrees so 
that it is the right way up again 
(again, more on this later), further 
memory will be required (or a hard 
drive) so that the data can be cached 
while the rotation takes place. 

Migraph OCR feels really wobbly 
with 2.5Mb, and crashes 
occasionally. With 3Mb it is more 
stable, provided you don't try to 
multi-task too much and stick to 300 
dpi scans. Once you get over 4Mb, 
Migraph OCR never complains of 
memory shortage, even with a full A4 
page at 400 dpi loaded. 

Migraph OCR can import black- 
and-white (two-colour, that is) IFF 
ILBM files, so it can use scans 
created with any Amiga scanner, plus 
two-colour IMG and TIFF files so that 
pages scanned on another platform 
can be transported on to Amiga disks 
and imported if required. 



DIRECT SCANNING 

The software currently has direct 
support for three hand-held 
scanners: Migraph, AlfaData and 
Golden Image. 

It's the interface part of the 
scanning equipment that's important 
here, and the interfaces for these 
three hand scanners operate in the 
same way. If you own another make 
of hand scanner - Power Scanner or 
DataScan Professional for example - 
you can still use Migraph OCR but 
you'll have to use the scanner's 
specific software to create and save 
the IFF ILBMs, and then import them 
into Migraph OCR. 

(Or you could try 16/32 Systems 
on 0634 710788 which sells the 
Golden Image interface separately, 
which allows you to use the direct 
hand scanning part of Migraph OCR). 

The direct scanning part of 
Migraph OCR is a doddle. The Scan 
Settings requester has just three 



features, and one 
of those - the scan 
resolution - is 
automatically read 
, from the switch on 
«!•."•» ieai the scanning head. 
ta f??.'!^ A slider allows you 
to specify the 
length of the scan 
in inches or 
centimetres. This 
slider is intelligent 
inasmuch as its 
maximum length 
will never be 
greater than 
memory will allow; 
14in is the 
absolute maximum. 
The width is always 
4in - the width of 
the scanning head of course. 

The third option is Portrait or 
Landscape. Portrait is for scanning 
columns of text that are 4in or 
narrower. Landscape lets you scan 
wider text sideways, after which the 
software automatically rotates the 
scan by 90 degrees so that 
everything is upright on the screen. 
The tricky parts are getting the 




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Saving the text as 'lines' results in the 
width being maintained and a carriage 
end of every line 

brightness level correct and scanning 
exactly vertically or horizontally - but 
this comes with experience. As it 
happens, Migraph OCR does not 
complain at all if a scan is slightly 
skewed - no more than five degrees 
off true In my experience - the scan 
can still be read by the OCR 
software, although it takes a little 
longer and misreads characters more 
often because the software has to 
work with its head tilted to one side, 
as it were. The more skewed the 
scan, the longer it takes to interpret 
and the more mistakes are made. 
Migraph OCR has been written 
with hand scanners very much in 
mind. The developers have realised 
that many people may want to scan 
wide A4 pages of text, and have 
included an Append facility to the 
saving of text so that three or four 
Landscape strips of page can be 
scanned, read and saved one after 
the other, resulting in the one file of 
ASCII text. If you are using a scanner 
not supported by the software, then 



you would need to import each scan 
and rotate it before letting OCR loose 
on it, but you can still append the 
text to the ASCII file created by the 
previous scan. 

Owners of flatbed A4 scanners, 
of course, will not have this problem 
because the full page can be 
scanned, imported and interpreted in 
one session. But it's worth pointing 
out that 300 dpi is the minimum 
resolution required; the software will 
certainly read 200 dpi^^^^^^ ^^^^ 
scans and try to 
interpret them, but 
anything below about 
15pt text is hard work 
and probably quicker 
to type in yourself. 

Once the scan to 
be processed is in 
Migraph OCR, 
whether scanned 
directly or imported, 
it's time to do some optical 
character recognition. 

'I KNOW THAT FACE' 

Migraph OCR uses 'Omnifont 

technology', which is the feature 

analysis method of character 
recognition 
described earlier. 
The manual says it 
has been pre-trained 
on 20 typefaces: 
Artisan, Bookman, 
Brougham, Caroll 
Pica. Courier, 
Courier Italic, 
Delegate, Elite 
Modern, Helvetica, 
Herald Elite, Letter 
Gothic. Lori, Lubalin, 
OCR-B, Pica, 
Prestige Elite, 
Prestige Italic, 
Prestige Pica, 

Times, Titan and Title. (I make that 

21 typefaces, but who's counting?) 
It's fair to say that most of you 

won't be able to recognise by eye 

any of these typefaces, but this 

needn't concern you because you 

don't have to tell the software what 

typeface it is reading, the process is 

almost entirely automated. 
On top of feature analysis, 

Migraph OCR has context sensitive 

linguistic 

databases. These 

are Proximity- 

Merriam-Webster 

for English, and 

Proximity-Collins for 

French and German. 

It also has the 

ability to train the 

software to 

recognise and 

remember 

questionable 

characters and even 

complete typefaces. 

So from a 'technical 



"Migraph OCR has 

been written with 

hand scanners very 

much in mind" 



original column 
return at the 



specs' point of view, Migraph OCR 
really is the bee's knees, right on the 
cutting edge. 

Before you can start processing 
the scan there are one or two things 
you might want to tell the program. 
Like in what order the columns of 
text should be processed, and which 
part or parts of the scan should be 
ignored - your scan may have a 
graphic on it. for instance, or a large 
dropped capital, and you will 
^^^^^^^^~ probably want the 
software to ignore 
these. 

This is achieved 
by drawing 'clip' 
boxes around 
areas of the scan. 
For a scan of text 
in three columns, 
for example, you 
. would draw a clip 
box around each of 
the three columns; the box you draw 
first will be processed first, the one 
you draw second will be processed 
second, and so on and so forth. If 
you muck up the order in which you 
draw the clip boxes the software will 
let you rearrange the 'sort' order. 

Of course, some pages you scan 
may have graphics on them in 
awkward positions, busting into the 
text with the text running around 
them. Migraph OCR deals with this 
problem by allowing you to draw 
'polyline' clip boxes as well as 
simple rectangular ones. This makes 
it easy to click around the boundary 
of a graphic in order to exclude it 
from the finished clip box. 

And if drawing polyline clip boxes 
proves awkward or confuses you, 
Migraph OCR will let you draw a 
series of overlapping rectangular clip 
boxes and will then automatically 
combine them to form a polyline box. 
Nice touch. 

After a clip box has been drawn it 
can be finely adjusted by dragging 
control points or 'handles' at the 
intersection points. A 'thumbnail' 
representation of the whole scan can 
be viewed to position the bounding 
boxes approximately, then there are 
two magnification levels if accurate 
adjustments need to be made. You 



can move about the magnified scan 




. redutt 

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oiidalr unat Cohrtodore eta 
Jv Sunner, tne aoandonrtent of the £311 



tr \?w -ofn ; fair « lonT.'^f^ oi. a C^-odor*: ft, £j « padi POH.bla b 
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ItfiS than ona par cant nadir U cariatn. 

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-.1,, , raduct on inpotiibte. Thara \i no r,*wi v-t on th* 1618 bunrMo planned to 

built orouod on. M> aan* a Ta Bafrtan and that It nav 'aatura 4 u«llienied but 
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falsa ialas. It nalrot a b 



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ri ■ f I hum* pivtholagicat ly. fit the nonant a 
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or around tIBB. it clo.ai fha oar floifa a lot nor. 
luallv dot*.* ha of farad. 



Saving the text as 'paragraphs' means that end-of-line 
hyphenations will be removed and each paragraph is 
saved as one long line with a carriage return at the end 
of It, making for easier formatting in your word processor 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 




, !!*»■■ I DaUaaah 





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textFllemw... I HKx.TXT 

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_ Append f Line 

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fraphic F arnat...' IFF 



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The Settings requester is uncomplicated, but I wish 
Mlgraph had used ticks to show when something has 
been selected instead of coloured-in squares 



by means of horizontal and vertical 
sliders, or by a locator gadget. 

Now, one of the worst aspects of 
complex programs is that sometimes 
they can be difficult to set-up simply 
because of the sheer number of 
different configurations possible. 

EASY TO SET UP 

Migraph OCR isn't like that. The 
Settings panel is divided neatly into 
four sections. The Input section 
wants to know 
whether the scan is ™ 
going to be coming 
from a scanner or a 
file, and if it's a file 
it needs to know 



which graphics 

format to expect 

from IFF, TIFF or 

IMG - or an 

intelligent '#?' 

option tells the 

software to investigate the file to be 

imported and act accordingly, which 

is a much more sensible idea. 

The Output section is no more 
difficult. Output format can be 
selected, although currently only 
ASCII is supported; I imagine 
Migraph is considering support for 
the popular Amiga word processor 
formats, should the need arise, but 
in the meantime they can all read 
ASCII so there's no real problem. 

The output filename is specified 
here, along with whether you want 
the data appended to an existing file 
of the same name, and whether the 
output should be written as 
paragraphs (recognised by 
indentations or blank lines between 
paragraphs in the scan) or lots of 
single lines, retaining the column 
width of the original. The path and 
name of your favourite text editor or 
word processor can be specified, and 
an option can be selected that 
automatically runs the editor and 
loads into it the text you've just 
OCRed, ready for any corrections that 
may or may not need to be made. 
Note that to use this feature you'll 
need plenty of memory because 
Migraph OCR isn't closed down - the 



"Areas of your 

scanned page can 

be specified as 

graphics" 



text editor or word 
processor will be multi- 
tasked. 

One final output 
setting allows you to 
select a graphics 
output format of IFF 
(ILBM) or TIFF. Areas of 
your scanned page can 
be specified as 
graphics and 
subsequently saved, 
but I would guess you 
won't be using this 
feature very often 
except maybe to save 
the odd line drawing or 
logo, or perhaps to 
save the entire scan 
for posterity. 

The Temporary Path setting 
allows you to specify where Migraph 
OCR should save files when it needs 
to cache data. If you've got 6Mb of 
memory or more, you can safely 
specify RAM: here, which helps to 
speed things along now and then. 
The most complex part of the 
Settings requester is the Documents 
section. The Language setting is 
obvious enough, but the Dictionary 
^^^^^^^^ setting can be 

"" confusing at first, 
and it is important 
to understand how it 
works. This 
dictionary isn't the 
context sensitive 
lexicon database, 
it's your 'user- 
defined' dictionary 
_ for training the 
software to 
recognise new characters. 

You can New, Append or Read 
this dictionary. New means create a 
brand new dictionary of the specified 
name, overwriting any dictionary of 
this name that already exists (you 
will be asked to confirm before 
overwriting). Append means add any 
new characters that you train it to 
recognise during this OCR session to 
the dictionary of the specified name. 
Read means use the dictionary of 
the specified name to try to find any 
characters that aren't recognised, 
but don't add any new ones to it. 

The idea is that you create 
specific dictionaries for specific 



typefaces or publications. Say, for 
example, you regularly scanned and 
OCRed articles from Amiga Shopper, 
then it'd be sensible to create a New 
dictionary called 'Shopper' on your 
first session, and Append to this 
dictionary on every subsequent 
Amiga Shopper OCR session. After a 
while the software will know all about 
Amiga Shopper's typeface, and will 
sail through scans like a knife 
through butter. Scans from other 
publications or documents, however, 
would be saved to a dictionary of 
another name. 

It would be perfectly possible to 
create one massive user dictionary 




Using a flatbed scanner you can import 
page. Any graphics on the page can be 
saved if required, or deleted If you want 

covering every different typeface you 
ever scanned, but this would slow 
things down to a crawl because the 
whole user dictionary would have to 
be searched every time. It's better to 
have smaller and more precise 
dictionaries for every occasion. 

Text and Pitch have to be 
specified in the Document section as 
well, which is the closest you get to 
telling the software which typeface to 
expect. Small (under lOpt) and 
Normal (10-18pt) are your choices of 
text, Fixed and Proportional are your 
choices of Pitch. 

The final Document setting 
specifies whether you want 
Interactive Learning or not. If this is 
not selected the program goes into 
Automatic mode and any characters 
it fails to recognise precisely will be 
replaced with its best guess or, if it's 
really stuck, with an '@' character. 



a whole 
'clipped' and 
rid of them 



THE ALL-IN-ONE SOLUTION 

If you're interested in OCR but don't own or have access to a scanner, It 
might be worth considering buying the two together in AlfaData's 
'AlfaScan Plus with OCR' package, thus saving yourself a few bob. 

The hand scanning software supplied is the excellent Touch-Up, plus 
the Merge-lt utility that allows you to join two narrow scans together to 
make a wider one. The scanning head is the standard Marstek unit 
supplied with almost all Amiga hand scanners. 

The version of Migraph OCR included in the bundle is the same as the 
version reviewed here, except that the File Import option has been 
disabled, so you can only OCR pages that you scan directly into Migraph 
OCR using the supplied AlfaScan Plus scanner. 



Until you've built up a few user 
dictionaries you should have 
Interactive Learning switched on. 

All these settings can be saved 
to a default configuration file that 
gets loaded automatically when you 
run the program; alternatively you 
can save configuration files under 
personal filenames to be loaded by 
yourself at the appropriate time. 

TEACHING IT TO READ 

At last we've arrived at the actual job 
in hand, the optical character 
recognition stage. So it's time to 
click that button... The job is 
completed in several 'behind the 

scenes' phases during 
which decisions are 
made with the help of 
the main dictionary, 
any user-dictionary 
specified, and the 
lexicons. The time this 
takes depends on how 
large the scan is, the 
quality of the scan, 
how skewed the scan 
is, and whether it 
already knows about 
the particular 
typeface(s) it finds. On 
an Amiga 500 Plus 
with GVP hard drive 
and 4Mb of memory, 
for a handscanned 4in 
by 4in area of text 
these phases take about two or 
three minutes to complete; on an 
Amiga 3000 it usually takes well 
under a minute for even a full A4 
scan of maybe 1,000 words. 

Once these phases have finished 
you are presented with the 
Interactive Learning requester so 
that you can tell the software what to 
do about any unrecognised 
characters. The way this Interactive 
Learning requester works takes a 
little getting used to, and you're 
bound to muck it up a few times to 
begin with, but the procedure soon 
falls into place. 

At the top of the requester is a 
box showing the ASCII version of the 
last few lines of text that have been 
processed, with the word that 
contains the unrecognised character 
inverted at the end of the display. 
Below this is a much smaller box 
showing the scanned version of the 
same word; the unrecognised 
character is displayed in black, the 
rest of the word is ghosted. 

Below this is another box, with a 
string gadget containing what the 
software thinks the unrecognised 
character is. If the software is wrong, 
you can delete this character and 
correct it. 

Many of the unrecognised 
characters Migraph OCR throws up 
will be two or three characters that 
by design or fluke are touching. For 
instance, some character pairs that 



76 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



are tightly kerned (pushed closer 
together, in other words) will be 
presented to you for confirmation - 
it's amazing how often the 
software's best guess is correct. 

There are two ways of confirming 
a character (or sequence of 
characters), by Accepting or Training. 
Accepting means the character won't 
be remembered, so the next time the 
software comes across the same 
thing it won't recognise it and will 
ask for confirmation again. Training 
means the character will be 
remembered for the rest of that 
session, plus subsequent sessions if 
you are saving a user dictionary. 

Two buttons in the Interactive 
Learning requester allow you specify 
a 'default' confirmation. This enables 
you to speed up the process 
significantly by simply pressing the 
Return key instead of having to take 
your hands from the keyboard to grab 
the mouse and click a button; 
alternatively you can hit the assigned 
function key. 

Sometimes the 
software will guess that 
a sequence of touching 
characters is just one 
character, and this 
character is presented 
for editing in the string 
gadget. If, say, the 
sequence should be 
'rme' and the software 
has guessed 'w', then 
you can delete three 
spaces backwards, 
enter 'rme' and press 
Return. This procedure 
is probably the most 
difficult to get used to, 
along with what you 
have to do when a 
broken-up or badly 
scanned single 

character is guessed as being two 
separate characters; the technique 
here is to correct and Accept the 
guess in the string gadget for the 
first half of the character, then when 
the second half is presented to you, 
delete it using the Delete gadget or 
the appropriate function key. 

Should you suddenly realise you 
have made a mistake, there's no 



need to panic because the software 
remembers the last 15 unrecognised 
characters and will allow you step 
back and correct them. 

DOES IT WORK? 

Migraph OCR is extremely easy to 
use; the manual is hardly needed. 
The most important thing you have to 
remember is that if you keep 
overwriting the user-dictionary by 
having New selected during every 
OCR session, then the software is 
going to be continually asking you for 
confirmation, slowing down dreadfully 
a process that you will eventually 
want to be as automatic and quick 
as possible. 

You must remember to create 
different user-dictionaries for 
different typefaces, and you have to 
remember to Append to these 
dictionaries every time you have an 
OCR session using that typeface. 
This way, gradually you will be asked 
to train the software less and less 
until, eventually, the software will be 




- who 



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overt lou- 



Ht rm'lift to"?!*. 

!u and Fit, «e lyeat 
■chins »p<j writh»v --.--- 
tirv »tia sick of trying; I n.tirto jf 
and scared of dyitrj out Or Km Hi 
t Urn ralllnf lion?. , Thf nor Id | 
Mi*ftPOp«l*r nuiif bntn m»nf and *._.._. 
1, but thr tvnti'lK imtury nai produced few 
* r»i»n«ot lines than Ihoit, just as It has pro- 
need feu cultural hprott of the stature and * 
"te«r>tv of Paul Robeson, who first recorded the 
i'ds back in 1 9?«. 

lis sibi waul the iftleriiMU buck slaves . 
the cotton fields is itself outstanding But 
sunt by Robron't rich, bass voice it 
ies deeply novinq. alnott nythicat. 
a voice this was. Hiratuiously deer 
itrelv in pilch ba\ in texture, 
ore Inclined to describe tt as 'pro 
ecordinBsof it arr Injvtlabfy wrei 
—title Md hiss that offends ears • 
ily of the distal auo tiif there 
-* '<M once caltfd ' 
roujht by Mature in 
t'.-r.i rtvdiun was th 
catholic in fits la 
Uh a depth pronabl 



vn 



The software will need to be trained to recognise 
most italic typefaces because they are normally 
tightly kerned - that is, the bottom half of letters 
tuck underneath the top half of preceding characters 



able to go it alone. How long this will 
take will depend on how much 
OCRing you do. 

To be completely objective about 
how accurate Migraph OCR can 
become, and how quickly it can 
learn, I would have to test it for a 
long, long time. 

You will appreciate, I'm sure, 
that I don't have that time because 
you want to know about this software 
now - not next year. So I gave it a 
really cruel test... 

I picked a page of text at 
random, handscanned it, OCRed it, 
and then counted how many 
mistakes it made. 

The software was not pre-trained 



B 



_. Jm i.. c . 
teauty of what . 
it instrueient i 



irltuai dui ne wa< 
t slightest song i 



at you tre 

Mo the 
< disguising 
est 

untni9- 



on the typeface, so I had to go 
through the Interactive Learning 
process with it. After I had trained it 
on the unrecognised characters in 
this one scan, I imported the scan 
afresh, instructed the software to 
Read the user-dictionary I created, 
and then set it off on Automatic. 

The scan was of a 3in by lOin 
column of lOpt typeset text from a 



"...27 mistakes in 

3,364 characters. 

That's a 99.17% 

success rate" 



magazine. It contained 3,364 
characters (608 words). The text file 
the software created contained just 
one mistake, misreading an 
apostrophe as a comma, maybe 
because the scan was slightly 
skewed in the middle. 

However there was a further 
complication in that a number of 
spaces had been inserted into the 
text where they shouldn't have been 
- mainly before full stops and 
commas, but also in the middle of a 
few words - 26 of them in all. So 
being really hard on it, there were 27 
mistakes in 3,364 characters. That's 
a 99.17 per cent success rate. 

The spaces before punctuation 
marks were dead simple to put right 
in my word processor using a quick 
search and replace operation. The 
apostrophe and the spaces in the 
middle of words I had to correct by 
hand, although a spelling checker 
helped. It took me five minutes to 
scan and OCR the page, plus a 
further minute to clean up the 608 
words produced. Six minutes in all. 
That's 100 words per minute, as fast 
as a professional speed typist. 
Speaking as a three-fingered typist, it 
would have taken me half an hour to 
type 600 words. 

Is Migraph OCR too good to be 
true? That's what I thought, so I tried 
again with another scan and a 
smaller typeface, 9pt this time. I 
ended up with 40 mistakes in 5,295 
characters (935 words), a 99.24 per 
cent success rate. Again a lot of 
those mistakes (15) were unwanted 
spaces before punctuation marks. 
And this time I noticed (for the first 
time!) that because I'd saved the 



Saving text as 'lines' can make 
editing and formatting the resultant 
file hard work. Best to select 
'paragraphs' whenever possible 



GET AN OCR UPGRADE - FREE! 

There were a couple of slight problems with Vl.Ox of Migraph OCR, and 
Golden Image (UK) Ltd is offering a free Vl.l upgrade to owners who have 
earlier versions, whether it is the full version or the version that comes with 
the 'AlfaScan Plus with OCR' package. Phone Golden Image on 081-365 
1102 for more details. 



CHECKOUT 
Migraph OCR 
version 1.1b 



Ease of Use • • • • • 

A couple of goes and you're an expert. 
Hand scanning in a straight line is the 
difficult part to master. 

Features • • • • O 

ToolTypes support Workbench or 
Custom screen in two or four colours 
(PAL/NTSC, HiRes/HiRes-lnterlaced, 
plus user-defined Overscan sizes). The 
only feature it lacks is the ability to edit 
the user dictionaries. It's a real pain 
when you accidentally save a bum 
character because the only way to 
remove it is to trash the whole 
dictionary and start again 

Speed • • • O O 

The OCR itself is quite quick but the 
interface could do with some speeding 
up. It can take a couple of minutes for 
the program to load and for the Migraph 
screen to appear. 

Documentation • • • O O 
Does all that is required of It. Any bigger 
and people would complain. 

Price Value • • • • • 

It's terrific value, well less than half the 
price of equivalent PC software. 



Overall rating 



i'.: 



Stunning stuff. But remember that you 
need a hard drive and you're bound to 
have the odd problem if you have less 
than 4Mb of memory. 



text as paragraphs (as opposed to 
lines), the hyphenations in words at 
the end of lines in the scan had been 
automatically removed and the two 
halves of the word joined together. 
It's obvious that Migraph OCR 
delivers, and when you consider the 
cost of equivalent software on the 
PC, Migraph OCR seems a bargain. 
OK, it's not 100 per cent perfect, no 
flexible OCR software is (yet), but I 
think we can live with 99 per cent 
accuracy for the moment. I\1 

OOOUOOOOO 
SHOPPING LIST 



Migraph OCR. 



.£160 



by Migraph Inc, 

32700 Pacific Highway South, 

Suite 12, Federal Way, WA 98003, USA 

* 0101-206-838-4677 

AlfaScan Plus with OCR £249 

by AlfaData Computer Technic Corp, 
3FL, No. 8 Lane 263, Chung Yang Road, 
Nan Kang, Taipei, Taiwan 

Both distributed in UK by: 

Golden Image (UK) Ltd, Unit 12a, 
Millmead Business Centre, 
Millmead Road, 
London N17 9QU 
■a 081-365 1102 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



T. 



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Paul Overaa test drives the new HiSpeed 
Pascal package from HiSoft 

IN THE 
FAST LANE 



PASCAL 



and 'find-S-replace' options are 
also provided along with a 
bookmark scheme which allows 
you to insert place-markers into 
a program file. In addition to this 
there are options for defining all the 
usual types of global settings for tab 
size, end-of-line behaviour, auto 
indenting, automatic back-up 
creation and so on. Most editor 
settings can be saved to disk and 
when the editor has been asked to 
create project icons, things like 
bookmark settings can also be 
stored along with the project. 
Not only can the compiler 
options be controlled directly from 
the editor but you can also compile 




iSpeed Pascal has 
arrived. If you're 
thinking about learning 
a new language, Is this 
the package for you? How does 
HiSpeed Pascal stand up to the 
competition? 

When you open the package 
you'll find two manuals and three 
disks - separate program disks are 
provided for Workbench 1.3 and 
Workbench 2 users and the third 
disk contains the system's unit files 
(units are libraries of predefined 
functions, procedures and data). 

The manuals are up to the usual 
high standard of HiSoft-related 
documentation. A user manual and a 
technical reference manual are 
supplied (containing 202 and 278 



pages respectively). The user manual 
provides an introduction to the 
system and deals with the editor, 
compiler, debugger and other tools. 
There's also a section introducing a 
number of Amiga-specific operating 
system issues including the use of 
the system's Amiga units and their 
connections with the library, device 
and resource mechanisms. 

The technical reference manual 
deals with the syntax of the language 
and the HiSoft/D-House implemen- 
tation. Also included are more unit 
descriptions (namely the DOS, 
System and Graph units). 

The material of both manuals is 
well written. My only niggle is that I 
would have preferred to have seen 
the operating system support 




Pascal is a 
powerful high- 
level language beloved of 
academics. Unlike languages 
such as Basic and C, which still 
let the programmer take liberties 
with code, Pascal has strict 
rules. In fact, the Pascal way of 
doing things works to the 
advantage, rather than the 
disadvantage, of the 
programmer. With Basic type 
languages for Instance you might 
start off a program using a 
variable called MESSAGES but, 
whilst using this later in the 
program, might mis-type the 
variable's name and write 
MESAGES or forget the $ 
identifier and write MESSAGE. 
Basic is happy to let you do 
this and on seeing these variable 
names will actually create new 
variables for you. The net result 
at the end of the day is that your 
program will not work as 
intended. Pascal does not let 
you make such mistakes. If you 
do try to use a variable that has 
not been properly declared the 



BEGINNERS 
"START HERE 




compiler will tell 
you. 

Pascal also has useful 
conventions concerning 
functions and procedures and 
the data they work with. It is 
because of these and other 
benefits that Pascal has a high 
profile in colleges and 
universities. In fact most serious 
books on algorithms and 
program design tend to adopt 
Pascal or Pascal type pseudo- 
code as the vehicle for their 
explanations. 

Pascal is a well standardised 
language and there is an ISO 
(International Standards 
Organisation) standard available. 
Having said that, the language 
does come in a number of 
'flavours' and Borland's Turbo 
Pascal, because of Its popularity 
in the PC world, needs a 
mention. By the sheer size of its 
user base Turbo Pascal has 
created its own defacto Pascal 
standard' and there are a great 
many Turbo Pascal books and 
PD programs available. 



chapter of the user 
guide moved to the 
technical reference 
manual because that 
way all the unit 
documentation would 
have been together. 



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THE HISPEED 
PASCAL EDITOR 

This makes extensive 

use of the Workbench 2 

way of doing things - 

you'll find action and 

check-box gadgets, 

radio buttons and 

gadgets which cycle 

through various options as they are 

selected. The editor lets you work 

with multiple files and enables you to 

open multiple windows into the same 

file (this is handy for multiple copy 

and paste operations between areas 

of the same program because you do 



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Include: 

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Compiler settings are easily 
adjusted within HiSpeed Pascal 

not have to keep moving between the 
source and destination sections). 

Clipboard cut/copy/paste 
facilities are provided and these are 
mouse-controlled, ie by holding the 
left mouse button down and wiping 
the mouse over the area of program- 
code you wish to mark for copying. 

There is a macro facility which 
lets the editor learn, and re-play, any 
useful sequences of keystrokes and 
some good requester-based 'find' 



HiSpeed Pascats editor program 

and run your programs. Automatic 
location of errors in the source after 
a failed compilation is provided and 
the net result is that HiSpeed Pascal 
offers an environment which enables 
you to create, load and 
save, compile, edit and 
run finished programs 
directly from the editor's 
menu system. 
There are far more 
options than space 
permits us to talk about 
but the important thing 
is that the HiSpeed 
Pascal environment, 
which like Devpac 3 
uses the editor as the 
main anchor point, 
provides a level of 
integration which will 
appeal to new-comers 
and experienced users. 

THE COMPILER 

This can be used as a stand-alone 
program or from the integrated 
environment provided by the editor 
program. Options are available for 
range, stack overflow, 10 error and 
string length checking and for the 
inclusion of varying amounts of 
debugging information. 

The compiler is largely 
compatible with Turbo Pascal 5.0 for 
the PC. This is a big advantage 
because it means that the large 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



PASCAL 



amount of software and books 
available to Turbo Pascal users will 
be useful to the HiSpeed Pascal 
user. However, the HiSpeed compiler 
does not currently implement the 



compilations. FDToPascal generates 
skeleton units from Commodore 
style function description files. 

THE AMIGA CONNECTION 



HiaSUri Pascal 1.81 ConrlglH i H12 HiSoft, D-Hiuit I 

InjlHEnliriEnn pc 



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Cutting and pasting between 
different projects is very easy 

new 'object orientated' language 
extensions which were introduced 
with Turbo Pascal 5.5. The HiSpeed 
compiler, as might be expected, is 
also similar to the Atari ST version 
and any problems when porting 
HiSpeed Pascal applications from 
the ST are likely to stem from data 
rather than program portability 
issues (see later). 

THE DEBUGGER 

The low-level Devpac debugger, 
MonAm, has been included with the 
package. It's a symbolic multi- 
window debugger able to step 
through a program displaying code 
instructions, 68000 register 
contents, processor status, and 
memory contents in hex or ASCII 
form as it does so. If debugging 
information has been included in a 



3|r with a number of units 
which give access to the 
Amiga's operating system 
(many of the example 
programs supplied with 
HiSpeed Pascal illustrate 
the use of these unit 
Tajc functions). While the 
manuals provide a good 
overview, users intent on 
accessing these 
components will (as with 
all languages) need to 
obtain the appropriate 
system documentation. 
B The Amiga uses a system 

of shared library, device and other 

hardware resources and 

a program must ask the 

operating system for 

access permission 

before using them. The 

Exec library, which 

includes functions which 

allow you to open other 

system libraries, does 

not need to be explicitly 

opened and since 

HiSpeed Pascal itself 

opens the DOS library a 

HiSpeed Pascal program 

can use both Exec and 

DOS functions (via the 

HiSpeed Pascal supplied 

DOS unit) directly. Other 

libraries, and the Amiga's device and 

resource facilities, have to be 

explicitly opened before use. 

The HiSpeed Pascal interface for 

all of these system support facilities 

is based on a number of units each 



documentation (ROM kernel manuals 
and the like) and some knowledge of 
the C language. A brief summary of C 
has been included in the HiSpeed 
Pascal user manual. 

Having said that, you only need 
travel down this road as far as it 
suits you. HiSpeed Pascal provides 
in-built DOS, CRT and Graph units 
which provide high-level Pascal type 
access to a great many graphics and 
display routines. The Graph unit for 
instance enables you to write 
programs using facilities equivalent 
to those provided by the Borland 
Graphics Interface for the PC. The 
advantages are that you can use 
them without being Amiga-System 
literate and that your programs will 
be more portable. Many users will 
find that these unit facilities are 
more than adequate for all their 
graphics and system function needs. 




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JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Algorithm - A description, based on a defined series of steps, which 
enables some task to be performed. 

Byte Ordering - Microprocessors can use two conventions when storing 
addresses and data items which consist of more than one byte. Some, like 
the Motorola 680x0 chips place the most significant bytes of the object 
first. Others, such as the Intel 80x86 series, use the reverse convention (ie 
they place the least significant bytes first). 

Syntax - Rules of a computer language which govern how it can be used. 

Unit - A precompiled collection of Pascal functions, procedures and data. 



program MonAm can use it to display 
the original program labels. MonAm 
is very powerful but as far as the 
Pascal code is concerned it suffers 
from one major disadvantage, 
namely that some experience with 
68000 assembly language is needed 
in order to use it. 

HiSpeed Pascal provides a 
couple of additional utilities: 
LibMaker lets you combine units to 
make a customised library file that 
the compiler can use to give faster 



of which encapsulates a single 
library, device or resource. These 
units provide all the relevant system 
header information (ie the data 
structures and predefined 
constants), together with the associ- 
ated procedures and functions. 

These system-related issues will 
clearly not affect a Pascal newcomer 
at first but when it does become 
necessary to investigate and use the 
run-time libraries and devices you will 
require the appropriate system 



HiSpeed Pascal makes good use of 
the Amiga's multi-window 
environment 



DATA PORTABILITY 

While many Pascal programs will be 
available to Amiga HiSpeed Pascal 
users with little change, there could 
be minor problems with moving data 
from the PC and, to a lesser extent, 
from the Atari ST. Since the ST uses 
the same processor there won't be 
any byte ordering problems, but the 
ST and the Amiga use different end- 
of-line conventions on their text files 
which may be something requiring 
attention (basically the ST uses a 
carriage-retum/linefeed pair to 
signify the end of a line in a text file 
whereas the Amiga uses a single 
linefeed character). 

With PC written data there are 
additional snags including the fact 
that the 80x86 based Turbo Pascal 
compiler uses a byte ordering 
convention which is the reverse of 
the 68000 based HiSpeed Pascal. 
None of these things will cause 
serious problems. As far as byte 
ordering is concerned, HiSpeed 
Pascal has SwapWord, Swap and 
HiWord instructions so that such 
changes can be made within the 
program reading the data. 



IN USE 

Most of the HiSpeed Pascal 
environment is very user friendly. The 
editor is a joy to use and the 
compiler, since it is menu driven 
from the editor, appears to be 
almost transparent. All the new user 
really has to worry about is writing 
programs. 

The same cannot be said of the 
debugger because of the need to 
understand 68000 assembly 
language. My advice to the new user 
would be to ignore MonAm and 
debug programs by listing them, 
thinking about them, and using 
Writeln() statements to dump 
important values back at the 
console. 

LAST WORDS 

Pascal is an important language and 
despite the high profile of languages 
such as C on the Amiga this 
HiSoft/D-House offering deserves to 
do well. Because it enforces good 
programming discipline, Pascal is 
ideal for beginners. Amiga 
programmers who are Pascal-literate 
will know only too well the 
advantages which the language 
offers - I for one will be taking a 
long-term interest in this product! C0 

ooooooooo 

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HiSpeed Pascal 



Ease of Use • • • O O 

The Editor's Intuition/Workbench 2 style 
of doing things is superb but the Mon-Am 
debugger may not be that useful since it 
needs the user to be familiar with 68000 
assembly language. 

Features • • • • O 

A powerful, well implemented, package. 

Documentation • • • • O 
Good, reliable, documentation. 

Speed • • • O O 

Editor and compiler have performed well. 

Price Value • • • • O 

Borland's Turbo Pascal has done much to 
bring down the prices of Pascal compilers 
and it is in packages such the HiSoft/D- 
House package that we see the benefits. 



Overall rating 



in 



At the risk of sounding like HiSoft's PR 
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80 



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CHAOS 




A lot of popular chaos 
theory is quite abstract, 
the Sierpinski gasket 
and the Mandelbrot set 
being prime examples. These two 
objects could not exist in the real 
world and have no links to nature. 
However, much of chaos theory, 
particularly the early material, is 
based on the natural world. 
One such example is the 
investigation into the growth and 
decline of populations by the 
biologist Robert May. He developed a 
simple equation, the May equation, 
which simulated the erratic 
fluctuations of populations. This 
equation forms the basis of one of 
the most interesting fractals, the 
Feigenbaum diagram, named after 
eminent chaos researcher Mitchell 
Feigenbaum. 

The Feigenbaum diagram 
represents the opposite situation to 
that of the Sierpinski triangle. That is 
to say that a complex, and in places 
chaotic, structure is generated from 
the very simple, non-random, formula 
which May derived from population 
dynamics. The accepted name for a 
non-random process such as this is 
a deterministic process. 

THE MAY EQUATION 

There isn't space here to explain 
how May's population equation is 
derived, so I'll just state it and 
explain how we can use it. In this 
article the equation will be used to 
model the spread of a virus through 
a group of people, in this case the 
'population' is the number of people 
infected with the virus. The equation 
takes the number of people infected 
at the beginning of a week (in the 
variable p) and uses it to calculate 
the number of people infected at the 



Last month we discovered flow an ordered structure 
could be created from a random process. This 
month Conrad Bessant generates chaos from order 



These four illustrations show May 
equation time series graphs calculated 
1.9,(2) c = 2.3, (3) c = 2.5, 
and (4) c a 2.9. It soon 
becomes apparent that the 
initial regularity of the line 
gives way to a more 
random scatter - ending 
up with 
complete 
chaos - see 




end of the 
week (p nevv 
The equation 
is: 

This basically states that 
the number of people 
infected at the end of the week (p new/ 
is equal to the number of people 
infected at the end of the previous 
week (p) plus the number of people 
who have been infected since then. 
The number of people infected during 
a week is c*p*(l-p), where c is the 
contamination constant, which 
represents the success rate at which 
the virus spreads and persists in the 
human body. Different values of the 
contamination constant can be used 
to represent different viruses. 

Note that the populations p and 
Pnew are not absolute values, they 
are percentages, so if the population 
is 30% then 30% of people are 
infected. Of course, Amiga BASIC 



Time 



MAY EQUATION CALCULATION TABLE 

Calculation People 

^___ infected (p) 



Week 0: 


p = 0.3 


30% 


Week 1: 


p = 0.3 + 1.9 * 0.3 * (1 - 0.3) = 0.7 


70% 


Week 2: 


p = 0.7 + 1.9 * 0.7 * (1 - 0.7) = 1.1 


110% 


Week 3: 


p = 1.1 + 1.9 * 1.1 * (1 - 1.1) = 0.89 


89% 



can't handle percentages directly so 
we use fractions instead, for 
example if 1% of people were 
infected at the beginning of the week 
we would say that p = 0.01. 

Now that we know what the 
symbols mean we can use the 
equation to predict the likely number 
of infected people at the end of any 
week. Let's create a theoretical 
starting situation (call it week 0) at 
the end of which 30% of the group 
have the virus (p = 0.3). If the virus 
has a contamination constant of 1.9 
(c = 1.9) the calculations to 
determine the number of people 
infected after the first four weeks are 
shown in the May equation 
calculation table. 

The results are calculated by 
feeding the previous week's 
population into the next week's 
equation. The equation is thus said 
to be dependant on mathematical 



feedback. Like the Sierpinski 
triangle, our population simulation is 
an iterative process, but in this case 
an iteration is defined as one 
application of the formula. 

If more values are calculated for 
this value of c and plotted on a time 
series graph (a graph of population 
against time) we can see that the 
population swings back and forth 
before reaching 100% (see 1 above). 

The initial swings in the 
population are easy to explain if we 
remember what the May equation 
represents. Populations below 100% 
occur when some people remain un- 
infected by the virus - when the virus 
is in a state of under-population. 
During such a period the virus 
thrives, but when the people become 
over-populated (the population is 
greater than 100%) many of the 
viruses run out of hosts and die, 
hence the population is reduced. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



CHAOS 



LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 

DEFDBL c,p 

INPUT "ContaminationJ 

constant , c : " , c 

p=.3 

PSET(0,200-p*140) 

FOR week=l TO 80 

p=p+c*p*(l-p) 

LINE -(week*8,200-p*140) 
NEXT week 






The second graph shows the 
population of the virus with c = 2.3. 
There is some oscillation before the 
virus settles down, but this time to a 
two point oscillation. 

Further values for c give even 
more interesting results, for instance 
when c= 2.5 the population settles 
down to oscillate between four 
values (see 3). By the time viruses 
with a contamination constant of 
c = 2.9 are reached the graphs have 
degenerated into chaos (see 4), with 
p jumping between different values. 

PROGRAMMING 

A simple graph plotting program can 
be used to experiment with various 
viruses (ie values of c). An Amiga 
BASIC version of such a program is 
shown in Listing 1 above. 

This program requests a value 
for the contamination constant c, 
and then performs the May equation 
for this value over a period of 80 
weeks, drawing a time series graph 
(with time horizontally and population 
vertically) as it proceeds. No axes 
are plotted because the actual 
values are unimportant, the program 
simply demonstrates different 
behaviour patterns. 



The main body of the program is 
the FOR. ..NEXT loop containing the 
easily recognisable May equation, 
and the LINE command which draws 
a line from one point to the next. 
Note that because the range of the 
week variable (1 to 80) is small in 
relation to the horizontal screen 
resolution (0 to 639) used by LINE, 
the x position passed to LINE must 
be multiplied by eight to use the 
whole screen. Similarly p has to be 
multiplied by 140 because of its 
small range (0 to 1.3). 

Experimentation with this 
program should establish that: 

• p always takes a few weeks to 
settle into a pattern 

• In most cases the higher the 
value of cthe more values p 
oscillates between 

• p always oscillates between an 
even number of values (except in the 
chaotic regions, and when c is one of 
a certain set of values, try c=2.83) 

• Values of c above 3.0 give 
meaningless results 

It would be difficult to find the 
exact value of c at which the 



oscillations go. say, from one to two 
numbers using this program. A better 
way is to combine the graphs of all 
the possible values of c into one. 
The composite graph that results is 
referred to as the Feigenbaum 
diagram (see below). Generating this 
is simple because we already have a 
program to calculate successive 
values of p. 

To draw the Feigenbaum diagram 
it is necessary to compress the time 
series graph for each value of c so 
that it fits into one vertical column of 
pixels on the screen. All of these 
compressed graphs are then drawn 
across the screen so that they form 
a map of p against c (see the Amiga 
BASIC program in Listing 2). This 
differs from Listing 1 in that: 

• The virus population is now 
calculated for 100 weeks. Because 
the system relies on feedback the 
first 50 calculations are performed to 
ensure that p has stabilised, but 
they are then ignored and only the 
second 50 are plotted. 

• All points on the graph are now 
plotted at the same horizontal 



"T P T a 






\aaaaaa 


rW 


r 




p 1 


/ lima * 


— — " timo 




| ■ 












Squash up all the May time series graphs for different values of c, put them 
side by side, and you get the Feigenbaum diagram shown here 



FURTHER EXPERIMENTATION WITH THE FEIGENBAUM DIAGRAM 



The Feigenbaum diagram is one of the few fractals that 
can make use of both sound and colour. By playing a 
note proportional in pitch to the value of the 
population, p, whenever a point Is plotted the sound 
can be used to give an audio representation of how the 
Feigenbaum diagram (above) degenerates into chaos. 

At the left hand side of the diagram the period is 
one, so the tone is constant, after bifurcation the tone 
oscillates between two pitches, and by the end of the 
diagram chaos has created random tones. Adding the 
following command after the PSET line is the easiest 
way to create the sound: 

SOUND p*1000+200,l 

To add colour, as well as the x and y position we need 
to know another piece of information to be represented 
in colour, for instance the number of times each point 
has been plotted, which is different in different sections 
of the Feigenbaum diagram. In the first section each 
point is plotted 50 times, in the second 25 times, and 
so on until points are rarely plotted more than once. 

The default screen set-up used by Amiga BASIC only 
allows four colours to be used. It is therefore necessary, 
if we are to make full use of the Amiga's colour 
capabilities, to open a new screen with 16 colours 
before drawing the diagram. This can be done by adding 



the following two lines at the head of Listing 2: 

SCREEN 1,640,200,4,2 

WINDOW 2 , "Colour Feigenbaum Diagram" , -J 

(0,0)-(617, 180), 15,1 

In simple terms these two lines open a high resolution, 
non-interlaced, screen with a 16 colour capacity and 
then open a window on that screen to which all 
subsequent Amiga BASIC output will be sent. The colour 
plotting routine can now be incorporated into the 
program by replacing the PSET line with the following 
program fragment: 



xp=(c-1.8)*520 

yp=200-p*140 

point 

oldcolour=POINT ( xp , yp ) 

COLOR (oldcolour+l)J 

MOD 16 

PSET(xp,yp) 



! Calculate x and. . . 
! . . .y position of J 

! Determine old colour 

!Set new colour 
!Plot the point 



The actual colour in which a point is plotted is 
determined by finding the old colour of the point with the 
POINT function and adding l. Because we are limited to 
16 colours, MOD 16 is taken of the colour value in order 
to keep the colour within the relevant to 15 range. 



LISTING 2 • 


LISTING 2 


DEFDBL c,p 




FOR c=1.8 TO 3 


STEP .001925 


P-.3 




FOR week=l TO 100 


p=p+c*p*(l 


"P> 


IF week>50 


THEN 


PSET ((C 


-1.8)*520,J 


200-p*140) 




END IF 




NEXT week 




NEXT c 


_^__^_ 



position and are not connected by 
lines so oscillatory patterns are 
easily identifiable. 
• A FOR. ..NEXT loop is used to 
generate values of c between 1.8 
and 3.0 (values below 1.8 are not of 
interest because they stabilise at a 
single value). 

WHAT DOES IT MEAN? 

The Feigenbaum diagram is not one 
of the most attractive fractals but it 
illustrates how a simple, non- 
random, iterative process can 
produce a finely structured image in 
places with total chaos in others. 

One result of much scientific 
study of the diagram is that 
conventions have been created to 
describe some of its most important 
features. The section of seemingly 
random pixels to the right of the 
diagram is loosely referred to as the 
chaotic region. 

The point where a single line 
splits into two is called a bifurcation 
and the splitting, or bifurcating, 
which occurs at these points is 
referred to as period doubling, as the 
number of equilibrium states (the 
period) doubles. The period is the 
number of possible values that p 
oscillates between after stabilising, 
for example the section between 
2.44 and 2.54 is period four. 

By the very nature of period 
doubling almost all sections past 
c=1.95 have an even number of 
possible states, but there is a large 
'window' of order in the chaotic 
region which is of period three. 

The two way relationship 
between order and chaos, 
demonstrated here and in Amiga 
Shopper 18, represents a whole new 
way of perceiving natural processes 
occurring all around us. Although our 
simple virus population program has 
inaccuracies it still illustrates the 
important point that a natural 
process such as population growth 
and decline can be described in one 
simple equation. 

Is it possible, then, that even the 
most complex natural processes can 
be reduced to simple equations, 
thus allowing them to be predicted 
with relative ease? This important 
question will be tackled next month 
when we discuss weather forecasting 
and strange attractors. (^ 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



MULTITAS KING 



A surprisingly large 
number of people aren't 
even aware that the 
Amiga can be made to 
run more than one program at the 
same time, yet this was one of its 
features which wowed everyone 
when the machine was first 
released. In fact, the Amiga is 
multitasking continually. 

All the time your Amiga is 
switched on, a number of processes 
are at work. There's a program that 
reads the mouse port, another that 
scans the keyboard, a program that 
updates the system clock, several 
programs that contribute to the 
drawing of windows, and a program 
that decides which of the other 
programs should be running at any 
one time - and all of this before you 
have even begun to run an 
application such as Deluxe Paint. 

If these programs can be likened 
to the largely unconscious internal 
processes that our brain concerns 
itself with, then a full-blown 
application can be compared to a 
task - such as washing the dishes - 
consciously undertaken on our part. 
It is here that the Amiga outperforms 



"Co-operative 
multitasking relies 
on the good nature 
of each program in 

the system.' 



// 



us, since it is quite capable of 
having, as it were, Its hands in many 
sinks. 

The Amiga only has one central 
processor - one device that can obey 
a program in the form of a list of 
instructions (actually there's the 
graphics co-processor or copper, but 
let's ignore that for the moment). 
Systems such as those developed by 
Inmos enable several processors to 
be linked, so that a separate 
program may be run on each 
processor. This is a hardware 
approach to multitasking; since the 
Amiga has only one processor it 
must rely on software simulation. 

A PIECE OF THE ACTION 

It relies on a concept known as 
'time-slicing'. In fact only one 
program is ever running at any 
moment, while the rest are left idle. 
After an allotted period of time this 
program itself becomes idle and one 
of the waiting programs takes its 
turn. The swapping of the 
processor's attentions between each 
of its programs occurs so quickly 
that each program is under the 
illusion that it has the processor all 



more 





Multitasking is one of the aspects of 

the Amiga that makes it unique 

among personal computers. Despite 

this, many users remain in ignorance 

of the feature and fail to get as much power from 

their machines as they might. In the first of a new 

series Cliff Ramshaw explains what it is and how to 

get the most from it... 



to itself. And, unless the burden on 
the processor is too high and 
everything slows down, the user is 
under the impression that the 
programs are running at once. 

Order is traditionally imposed on 
this seeming chaos in one of two 
ways. Co-operative multitasking 
relies on the good nature of each 
program in the system. It is more or 
less up to each of these to suspend 
their running after a time and give 
one of their neighbours a chance. 
The disadvantage with this approach 
is that if one program gets greedy 



Cltck M.2J 



determines its 'priority'. Obviously, 
the higher a program's priority the 
larger the share it gets of the central 
processor's time. The system works 
as follows. Exec chooses the 
program with the highest priority and 
runs this until either it has 
completed its job or it enters a 'wait' 
state. Then Exec looks at its list of 
programs and runs the one with the 
next highest priority. If it finds 
several programs with the same 
priority, then it will run each of them 
for a small period of time before 
going on to the next. 

The key here is 







Process 2: .uaderi as cotwand: 

Process 3: o«tded as eciwaiul: 

octss 4: oaded « oowand; 

00*55 3! oaded as commit 

Process 6; Loaded u coitnand: 
j.A|yoshj:> run dhl: tools/sap 
ICLI 61 

l.Alyosh*:) status 

Process a! Loaded as coniwrnd: 

" ' aded as cowumt 

aded as coimand 

(Process 41 Loaded as connand: 

[Process 5; Loaded u comand; 

Process 6: Loaded as coiwtsnd 



c:*dvm 
utili ties/so 
ulibtiesYcl 
toots/pwfwi 
dhi: tools/zai 



status 

utilities/screeriM 
utililies/clock 
tools/perfiton 
4M:tools/2ap 



Running more than one program 
from Workbench is a simple matter 
of clicking on a few Icons 

then the others don't get a look in, 
and the system becomes 
multitasking in nothing but name. 

The system used on the Amiga is 
pre-emptive multitasking. With this 
approach there is one program that 
looks after the system and ensures 
that each program in turn gets its 
share of the processor. The program 
that does this on the Amiga is known 
as Exec. 

Every program controlled by Exec 
has a number assigned to it which 



the idea of a 
program waiting. 
Without it, some 
lower priority 
programs might 
never run at all. In 
reality, Amiga 
programs spend 
much of their time 
waiting. A program 
that requires 
mouse input, for 
example, will 
spend a large 
proportion of its 
time waiting to be told by the Input 
Device which, if any, mouse 
movements have been made. In a 
non-multitasking system this would 
be achieved by the program going 
into a loop, constantly asking the 
Input Device for input, until a valid 
input was received, at which point 
the program would get on with 
processing it. 

This is very inefficient in a 
multitasking environment: the 
program would be hogging the 
processor when it was doing nothing 
more than waiting for something. 
Instead, Exec enables programs to 



state that they are waiting for a 
particular event. Once a program has 
done this, it is suspended, and Exec 
gets on with running any other 
programs it has to deal with. Sooner 
or later the Input Device (for 
example) will register a mouse 
movement. This information will be 
passed to the program that was 
waiting for it, the program will be 
taken out of its wait state and run, 
enabling it to process the 
information it has just received. 

ALL UNDER CONTROL 

Exec keeps a list of all programs 
under its control. Each of them can 
be in one of three states: actually 
running at the moment; ready to run 
once its turn comes; waiting for an 
external event, such as a message 
from the Input Device. 

There are some potential pitfalls 
with this system. Imagine, for 
instance, two programs both 
accessing a hard disk. One program 
is busy reading information from one 
part of the disk, and then it is 
suspended while the other program 
takes over. This second program is 
perhaps reading from another part of 
the disk. With these two programs 
constantly swapping, the disk head 
would be skipping backwards and 
forwards across the disk surface like 
a crazy thing. To prevent this sort of 
thing happening, it is possible for a 
program, when using a resource 
such as a hard disk, to make 
exclusive use of it - no other 
programs can use that particular 
resource until the one that originally 
claimed it is finished. 

Well, that's enough of the theory 
- any more detail is only of use to 
programmers, and can be found in 
the ROM Kernel Reference Manual: 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



MULTITASKING 



Exec. So far we've discussed nothing 
but the bedrock of the system. It 
seems like here is no water, only 
rock. Let's look then at the actual 
uses to which it can be put. 

One obvious use is to run an 
anti-virus program. For most of the 
time it will just sit there, doing 
nothing. But once a new disk has 
been placed in the drive, the anti- 
virus program will scan it for viruses 
and inform the user if any have been 
found. It is possible to load up such 
a program every time a disk needs to 
be checked for viruses, but it's far 
less hassle to have one running on 
the system all the time. Because the 
program spends most of its time 
waiting for a disk to be inserted, it 
takes up very little of the processor's 
resources and has no noticeable 
effect on the Amiga's speed. 

I use the public domain program 
Kill Da Virus, which I keep in the c: 
directory of my system disk. To set it 
going, I include the following line in 
my startup-sequence, just before the 
'LoadWB delay' line: 

run <nil: >nil: c:kdviii 

The AmigaDOS command 'run' sets 
another program running 
independently of the program that 
launched it (in this case the startup- 
sequence). The two peculiar clauses 
■<nil:' and '>nil:' are used to ensure 
that the console window is closed 
after the startup-sequence has 
finished. Although the virus killer 
operates from its own window, the 
'run' command will also attach it to 
the window from which it was 
launched - in this case the window 
belonging to the startup-sequence - 
and this window will not be closed 
until the program being run has 
finished. To avoid this, the input and 
output of the virus killer are re- 
directed to 'nil'. This basically tells 
the program that it has no use of the 
console window, which can safely be 
closed even though the program is 
running. 

THE SYSTEM CLOCK 

Another simple example of multi- 
tasking is In the display of the 
system clock. Wouldn't it be nice to 
have the time and date constantly 
displayed at the top of the screen? 
Well, the following line in your 
startup-sequence, again just before 
the 'loadWB delay' line, will do the 
trick: 

run <nll: n>nil: J 
:utllities/clock J 

digitall=240, 24hour J 
seconds date 

As you can see, the command uses 
'nil' in the same way as with the 
invocation of the virus killer. 
One possible use of 



multitasking, which many people are 
unaware of, is to format more than 
one disk at the same time. In fact, 
you can format as many disks as you 
have disk drives. Simply stick them 
in, click on them and select 
'Initialise' from the Disk menu of the 
Workbench screen. 

Of course, multitasking for most 
people means the ability to run more 
than one application at the same 
time. You might, for instance, be 
working in a word processor. Once 
you have finished writing your letter, 
you select print to get a hardcopy. 
Instead of waiting around for it to 
print, you can switch over to your 



finished document all ready to save 
on to it. 

It should be obvious that the two 
primary requirements for good 
multitasking are speed and memory. 
Every new program run of necessity 
slows down the speed of all of the 
others already running. While the 
Amiga can quite happily handle two 
or three non-speed intensive 
applications running at once, you will 
really notice the difference if you try 
word processing while, say, a 
Mandelbrot generator is at work. If 
you need to do a lot of multitasking 
regularly, the solution is to buy an 
accelerator. 



were part of memory: programs can 
be swapped between hard disk and 
memory as and when they are 
needed. Although this overcomes the 
limitations of insufficient memory, it 
has the side effect of further slowing 
everything down. At the moment, 
virtual memory is not an option for 
the average Amiga user, so buying 
more real memory is the only 
sensible option. As we've always 
said in Amiga Shopper, the more 
memory the better. 

That's about all we have space 
for this month, but before I go I'll 
mention the intriguing situation of 
simultaneously running two copies of 



D»IUX»P«ll>» Col 





I. II 1! ■/ ■! . 

FLCPHONt CMI-, ttn fNUI EWICT5EB » ltMIi M* 01*14] 
UK mi 

Deluxe Paint runs on its own 
custom screen. This image 
could be saved to RAM disk 
and Imported into Pen Pal 



THE MANY 
SCREENS OF THE 



Meanwhile, a Shell window is open on the 
Workbench screen. The disk formatting program 
has been launched from here 




The Pen Pal word processor is all ready to print. 
Once print Is selected, the Preferences print 
program will be engaged, and the user can get on 
with doing something else 



The Workbench screen. Several programs can run 
simultaneously in windows on this screen. Programs 
can also run in their own screens, with different 
colours and resolutions. Swapping screens is 
achieved by clicking on the gadget at the top right 
of the screen's title bar. Screens can be dragged up 
and down with this bar to reveal others beneath 



spreadsheet package and continue 
work on your accounts. 

Making use of multitasking can 
often save you lots of time. There 
was an occasion when I had to low- 
level format my hard disk. Now this 
takes well over an hour, and time 
was precious. So I set the format 
program away, and then got on with 
my work using Protext, saving 
occasionally to the RAM disk. By the 
time the disk was formatted I had a 



An adequate amount of memory 
is even more important. Bearing in 
mind that all of the programs running 
at any one time must be present in 
memory, a standard Amiga doesn't 
really have space for more than a 
couple of decent sized applications. 
Unix, an operating system popular on 
mini computers, gets around this 
problem by use of a strategy known 
as virtual memory. This enables the 
computer to treat its hard disk as if it 



the same program. In most cases, 
this would result in each copy taking 
hold of the chunk of memory it needs 
and acting completely independently 
of the other. There is an AmigaDOS 
command, however, which enables 
certain programs to be used several 
times although only one copy is 
present in memory. The command is 
'resident'. More about this and other 
multi-tasking aspects of AmigaDOS 
next month, rvi 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



85 



C PROGRAMMING 



Beginning 
with 




The first in a 
major series on the most popular 
programming language for the 
Amiga: C. Cliff Ramshaw kicks off 
with an introduction to C and a guide 
to installing it on your system,.. 



If you want to make money 
from programming, C is the 
language to learn. Its 
popularity on the Amiga, and 
on other systems, is enormous. A 
quick glance through the job ads in 
Thursday's Guardian will show you 
how much in demand C 
programmers are. 

Most of the work is on Unix 
systems, ranging from systems 
support to database creation, 
communications, code maintenance 
or real-time embedded systems 
design. There's also plenty of C 
coding going on in the PC world, and 
of course plenty of opportunities for 
writing applications for the Amiga. An 
experienced C programmer can 
expect to earn around £1500 a week 
as a freelancer. 

None of this is to say that C is a 
perfect language. It has received 
criticism for the freedom it allows 
programmers from exponents of 
more specialised languages such as 
Modula 2. A consequence of this is 
the ease with which it is possible to 
create programs with fatal errors; yet 
it is largely this freedom, and the 
brevity of the language, that has 
made C so popular. 

MULTI-PURPOSE C 

C is a a general purpose language. It 
was initially written for Unix, one of 
the first popular multi-user operating 
systems. Unix itself was 
subsequently re-written in C, as was 
the C compiler, giving the language a 
reputation for systems development. 
It was also used, however, to write 
the vast number of utility programs 
that come as standard with a Unix 
environment, and which may be 
likened to the commands that live in 
the c directory of the Workbench. 



Following the development of 
Unix, C has been used to write much 
of the Amiga's operating system. 
Prior to version 2, some of it was 
written in BCPL (a predecessor of C), 
but for the latest version this has 
been re-coded in C. Similarly, many 
of the programs available 
commercially and in the public 
domain are written in C. It really is 
the Amiga's mother tongue. 

Although a general purpose 
language, C is better suited to some 
applications than others. It has a 
reputation for speed, but it just isn't 
nippy enough for a full blown arcade- 
style game. Because C gives the 
programmer easy access to the nuts 
and bolts of the machine in a 
manner similar to assembler, it is an 
excellent language for systems 
development: writing operating 
systems, device drivers and so on. It 
is also useful for more high-level 
applications - spreadsheets, word 
processors, image processing - that 
are calculation intensive, although 
here some programmers may prefer 
Modula-2 or Cobol, since these offer 
more sophisticated data structure 
handling. C is superior to Basic in 
every respect save one: it is more 
difficult to understand. 

As with most languages more 
sophisticated than assembler. C has 
claims to portability. A program that 
is portable is one that, working on 
one machine, can be transferred to a 
different machine and still work. If 
the machines use different 
processors, then the program will not 
work directly on both, since the 
computers will expect their programs 
to be written in different codes. 
Nevertheless, the program's source 
code (the text which the programmer 
has created) should be transferable 



MAKING A NORM SYSTEM 



Before you can begin your programming endeavours you need to have a 
decent systems disk with the compiler, linker and so on Installed on it. 

NorthC normally comes compressed on to one disk. It unpacks on to two 
- a simple process, since it comes with a program specially written to 
automate the task. Before you begin, you need to prepare two blank 
formatted disks, named NorthC and NorthC Examples. This can be done 
from the CLI or Shell with the following commands: 



format drive df : name 
format drive dfO: name 



'NorthC" noicons 

'NorthC Examples" noicons 



Then change directory to that of the unpack command on the NorthC 
distribution disk. On my version (1.3), this is the directory "Distrlbute:NorthC 
1.3". Enter the command 'unpack', and have your two new disks to hand. 
Follow the instructions which tell you when to insert the various disks as the 
files are de-archived. 

What you do from here on depends on the kind of set-up you have. If you 
have a hard disk, then life will be much easier. Using the Shell or CLI, copy 
all of the files in the NorthC 'bin' directory into the 'utilities' directory of your 
system disk. Make a directory called 'include' on your system disk and copy 
the contents of the NorthC 'include' directory into it. Next make a directory 
called "dibs' on your system disk and copy everything in the 'dibs' directory 
of the NorthC disk into it. Finally, copy an editor into your utilities drawer. I 
recommend Memacs, which can be found in the 'tools' directory of the 
Extras disk. 

If you are working with floppy drives, then your best bet is to make a 
bootable disk with the compiler on it and the minimum of the Workbench 
disk necessary to aid you in development. This way you can keep your own 
programs on a separate disk or in the RAM disk, and have all of the 
necessary compiler files in one place. 

To do this first of all make a copy of your Workbench disk: 

diskcopy from dfO: to dfO: 

Swapping between your Workbench disk and new disk as requested. Now 
rename the new disk: 

relabel ? 

At the prompt, insert your new disk into dfO:. Then type: 

dfO: NCBOOt 

The next step is to make as much room as possible on the disk by deleting 
all of the unecessary files on it. Use the 'delete' command in conjunction 
with the following filenames and wildcards (ways of specifying more than one 
file at once): 

NCBoot :c/ fault 

NCBoot :c/install 

NCBoot:c/ed 

NCBoot :c /edit 

NCBoot : c/diskchange 

NCBoot : c/newcli 

NCBoot : c /diskdoctor 

NCBoot : #? . info 

NCBoot : devs /narrator . device 

NCBoot : 1/speak-handler 

NCBoot :pref s/#? . info 

NCBoot :pref s/pref erences 

NCBoot : system/*? . info 

NCBoot : 1/f astf ilesystem 

NCBoot : Trashcan 

NCBoot: Shell 

NCBoot: Empty/*? 

NCBoot : Empty 

NCBootExpansion/#? 

NCBoot : Expansion 

NCBoot :utilities/#? 

NCBoot : libs/mathieeedoub#? 

NCBoot : libs/translator . library 

NCBoot : f onts/ruby/#? 



QA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



C PROGRAMMING 



NCBoot : fonts /ruby 
NCBoot : font s / ruby . font 
NCBoot : f onts/diamond/#? 
NCBoot : fonts/diamond 
NCBoot : font s /diamond . font 
NCBoot : f onts/opal/#? 
NCBoot : fonts/opal 
NCBoot : font s /opal . font 
NCBoot : f onts/sapphire/#? 
NCBoot : font s/ sapphire 
NCBoot : font s / sapphire . font 
NCBoot : f onts /garnet /#? 
NCBoot : font s /garnet 
NCBoot : fonts/garnet . font 

Workbench 2 users will find that they don't have some of these files on their 
disk. To make room, they must also delete the following: 

NCBoot :pref s/wbpattern 

NCBoot :pref s/overscan 

NCBoot : pref s/palette 

NCBoot :pref s/screenmode 

NCBoot :pref s/time 

NCBoot : libs/rexxsupport . library 

NCBoot : libs/mathieeesingtrans . library 

NCBoot : libs/rexxsys lib. library 

NCBoot :rexxc/#? 

NCBoot : rexxc 

NCBoot : system/rexxmast 

NCBoot : c /magtape 

Now it's time to copy the relevant files from the NorthC disk on to your newly 
created NCBoot disk: 

copy NorthC :bin/NorthC NCBoot: utilities 
copy NorthC :bin/A68K NCBoot :utilities 
copy NorthC:bin/Blink NCBoot :utilities 
copy NorthC :bin/cc NCBoot :utilities 

The editor Memacs must also be copied into the utilities directory. Exactly 
how it is done will depend on the version of Workbench you are using. This 
works for version 1.3: 

copy "Extras 1.3 rtools/memacs' NCBoot :utilities 

Now to make directories for the include files and library files, and copy the 
stuff into them: 

makedir NCBoot : include 

copy NorthC: include /ft? NCBoot : include 

makedir NCBoot :clibs 

copy NorthC :clibs/libc. a NCBoot:clibs 

copy NorthC :clibs/crt0.o NCBoot :clibs 

Modify the startup-sequence so that the compiler knows where to find its 
include files and libraries. Use an editor such as Memacs and modify the 
disk's startup-sequence (held In the s directory) so that the final lines read 
as follows: 

;LoadWB delay 

cd NCBoot: 

assign clibs: NCBoot :clibs 

setenv INCLUDE NCBoot : include 

newshell "newcon:0/10/640/246/NorthC" 

endcli >nil: 

Workbench 2 users should replace the 'newshell' line with: 

newshell "con:0/10/640/246/NorthC" 

The final step is to make the disk bootable: 

install ? 

Insert the NCBoot into dfO:, type 'dfO:' and hit [Return]. Once the disk has 
stopped whirring, you're ready to reboot with your newly made development 
disk. 



to the second machine and then be 
capable of recompilation. This 
recompiled program should then run 
without hassle. 

Similar claims have been made 
for Basic, but there are so many 
versions that converting even a 
simple program from one machine to 
another involves a lot of re-writing. C, 
on the other hand, is standardised 
across all platforms. This is achieved 
by keeping the language small - C 
has surprisingly few keywords. 

You may be wondering how it can 
provide control over operating system 
commands, graphics, windows and 
so on across all machines, even 
those that don't have high resolution 
graphics or windows support? In fact 
C neatly side-steps the problem by 
not providing support for any of these 
things. Nor does it provide facilities 
for printing text to the screen, or 
even for dealing with strings of 
characters. 

IN SUPPORT OF C 

All of these functions are provided by 
a system of libraries. Each of these 
libraries holds a set of related 
functions, any one of which may be 
called from a user's program. The 
idea is that the compiler 
manufacturer will supply a set of 
libraries with its compiler for a 



required. Because different 
machines use different graphics 
formats, it is near impossible to 
create libraries sufficiently 
generalised to deal with all of them. 
So C compilers tend to come with 
two sets of libraries: the standard C 
ones, dealing with text input and 
output, strings and so forth, and 
machine-specific ones to cater for 
the more complex operations. 

What this means is that any but 
the simplest C programs will not be 
portable. Transferring an Amiga 
program which makes use of the 
blitter to the PC will cause problems, 
as the PC doesn't have a blitter. Ah, 
so the ideal of portability is an 
unattainable one, you may think, but 
this isn't entirely the case. 

The compromise involves the 
idea of modularity. Just as the C 
libraries are divided into general and 
machine-specific areas, so should 
your programs be split. The parts 
that deal with graphics, sound and 
so forth should be kept as separate 
as possible from the parts that 
manipulate data, perform logical 
decisions and so forth. The result is 
that if you come to implement the 
same program on a different 
machine, you can easily find and 
change the machine specific 
sections. Otherwise, you could be 



CHOOSING A COMPILER 



There is quite a number of C compilers for the Amiga. The package most 
professionals choose is SAS/LaWce C, available for £229 from HiSoft 
t 0525 718181. This is a lot of money for a language that you are as yet 
unfamiliar with, and which you are not sure is the one for you. Far safer, 
then, to try something from the public domain. We recommend NorthC, a 
package which includes a linker, assembler and numerous examples. It's on 
PDOM disk 211. We got our copy from Public Dominator which can be 
contacted on » 0279 757692. NorthC is now a charityware product. A lot of 
work has gone into it: and we urge you to send £15 to the Spastics Society 
as the author Steve Hawtin requests. 



particular machine. The actual code 
of the libraries themselves will vary 
depending on which machine they 
are written for, but they will provide 
the same functions as the libraries 
written for another machine. In this 
way, a user's program can make use 
of the libraries without worrying what 
type of machine it is running on. A 
program which calls the print 
function on the Amiga will access a 
library which delves deep into the 
Amiga's operating system: but the 
same program could be transferred 
to the IBM PC and re-compiled, 
where instead it would make use of a 
library which got to grips with the 
PC's operating system and library. 

This approach is all very well for 
simple text input and output, string 
handling and so forth, but it tends to 
fall down when more complex 
operations such as graphics are 



searching through a whole mass of 
code looking for those incompatible 
function calls. 

The C language itself is entirely 
portable, and since this series aims 
to explain C programming, most of 
the advice it gives will be applicable 
to C on any machine; it won't be until 
much later that we start to discuss 
the complex ideas of dealing with the 
Amiga's special functions. This 
means that what you learn here will 
be valuable on any platform. Become 
proficient in C and you become a 
valuable commodity in the 
programming world. Not only are you 
ready to write Amiga applications, 
but you're not far from entering the 
lucrative market for C programmers 
on the PC and Unix systems. 
Following this series, you should find 
it not only enjoyable and educational, 
but hopefully profitable too. €B 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



A R E XX 



If you've recently bought an 
Amiga or have upgraded your 
existing machine to 
Workbench 2.04, no doubt 
you've already heard of ARexx. But 
what is it and what are its 
capabilities? And why are the 



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Commodore may virtually ignore it 
within the Workbench 
manuals, but ARexx is one 
of the most powerful 
aspects of Workbench 2.04 



These are just a few of the many 
questions which we'll be exploring 
over the duration of this series. 

Before we can answer these 
questions though, it's important to 
understand precisely what ARexx is 
and what it is capable of. Sure, it's a 
programming language just 
like C or BASIC, but its 
Dower and flexibility are so 
great that it goes so much 
further than this. At its 
most basic level, ARexx 
has primarily three uses - 
as a programming 
language for writing 
stand-alone scripts 
(programs), as a macro 
language for controlling the 
operations of existing 
software and as a 
mediator between 
applications. 

Let's take a look at these 
three applications in a little 
more detail. 



a 

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techles getting so excited 
about It? There's no 
doubting that ARexx is 
important - after all, just 
flick through the pages of 
magazines such as Amiga 
Shopper and you'll see 
ARexx referred to over and 
over again, usually 
accompanied by words of 
praise. You may even have 
bought a software package L- 11 




ur-e Publishing Ltd 
HonnoiAh Stmt 



File definition 

Field raw Attributes 

Hate TXT 



Faint 

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(""Tent 
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which boasts ARexx compatibility 
on its packaging. But why are 
software vendors flocking to 
support an aspect of Workbench 
2.04 that Commodore virtually 
ignores in the Workbench manual? 



ARexx can be used as a macro 
language to automate common 
functions within packages as diverse 
as paint programs, page layout 
systems, databases, word 
processors and spreadsheets 



PROGRAMMING 

The basic ARexx command set is a 

bit of a hybrid 

between AmigaDOS "^^^^^™ 

and more 

conventional 

languages such as C 

and BASIC. As a 

result, ARexx can be 

used to create 

anything from a 

simple AmigaDOS-like 

script file to 

manipulate a set of 

files to full blown 

applications such as 

databases etc. In many ways, you' 

find ARexx preferable to other 



you'd expect from a modern 
programming language. 



"ARexx can be 

used to create 

anything from 

simple scripts to full 

blown applications 



MACROS 

One of the most 
powerful aspects of 
ARexx is its ability 
to talk to other 
applications 
running under the 
Amiga's 
multitasking 
environment via an 
-.ARexx 'port'. 
Although software 
applications have 
to be specifically 



written to support ARexx (this 
therefore rules out most pre- 




languages because ARexx scripts are 
often shorter and easier to write than 
a similar program written in a 
conventional programming language. 
The core commands of ARexx are 
quite powerful and are ideally suited 
to manipulating information in many 
different forms. The command set 
includes copy strings, strip leading 
characters from a string, extract 
substrings from strings (a bit like the 
MIDS command in BASIC), extract 
individual words from within a string, 
evaluate a string, generate a random 
number and much more besides. 
ARexx also includes all the sort of 
program control constructs that 



Workbench 2.04 software), 
developers are flocking to support 
ARexx simply because it provides a 
standardised way of controlling their 
software products externally. 

Say, for example, you wanted to 
convert a series of ray-traced frames 
stored in 24-bit format to HAM mode 
so that they could be displayed on a 
standard Amiga using a package 
such as ASDG's Art Department Pro. 
If you were to do this manually, it 
would not only be rather time 
consuming, but also rather boring. 
Because ADPro supports ARexx, you 
could automate this task by writing a 
simple ARexx script that tells ADPro 



THE AREXX SYSTEM 



The core of ARexx consists of a 
couple of very small files on the 
standard Workbench 2.04 
distribution disks. Among those 
included, there are basically three 
files that must be present to get 
ARexx programs up and running. All 
the ARexx command line programs 
can be found within a directory on 
your boot disk called 'REXX:'. 

• RexxMast - Within the current 
release of Workbench (2.04), ARexx 
isn't actually part of the firmware so 
it is necessary to install it before it 
can be utilised. 

This isn't as complicated as it 
sounds - providing that all the 
correct files are accessible, all you 
need to do is either run the 



RexxMast program manually or just 
add a line to your StartUp-Sequence 
so that it runs when the machine is 
booted up. ARexx doesn't stay 
resident when the machine is reset 
though, so it's much easier and less 
hassle to use the second option. 
RexxMast simply installs the ARexx 
command server so that it runs in 
the background. 

• RexxSysLib. library - This disk- 
based library must reside in the 
LIBS: directory of your boot disk 
when the RexxMast program is run. 
This library contains all the core 
instructions and functions of the 
ARexx language. Because it is a 
shared library, several ARexx scripts 
can access it simultaneously. 



• RX - Finally we have RX, a small 
Shell-based program that is used to 
execute your ARexx scripts. 

The RX program can also be 
used to execute ARexx statements 
directly from the command line or 
from within an AmigaDOS script. If 
RX is passed a filename, it will 
attempt to run an ARexx script of that 
name. 

Don't be too concerned about the 
other ARexx commands within the 
Rexx directory. 

We'll be covering these 
commands in some depth in a future 
issue, but in the meantime here's a 
quick rundown of what they do. 

• HI - If things start to get a bit out 
of hand, the HI command can be 
used to halt all active scripts 
immediately. 

• RXC - Closes down and kills the 



ARexx system if it is currently 
running. 

• TS - Turns on ARexx trace mode. 

• TE - Turns off ARexx trace mode. 

• TCO - Opens up an ARexx 'global 
tracing console'. 

• TCC - Closes the global tracing . 
console opened with the TCO 
command. 

• RXSET - Sets a global clip' 
variable. 

• RXLIB - Adds an ARexx function 
library to the system or displays a list 
of the currently accessible ARexx 
libraries installed. 

• WaltForPort - Instructs the system 
to wait for a message to be received 
from a given ARexx host (port). 



OQ AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



A R E X X 



what to do. You could then leave the 
Amiga running whilst it performed 
this task for you, leaving you to catch 
up on the latest happenings in 
Summer Bay or Ramsey Street. 

ARexx doesn't just automate 
applications, it can also be used to 
extend applications by creating new 
'super facilities' from an 
application's existing list of facilities. 
Say, for example, you needed to 
perform an operation on a 
spreadsheet that involved several 
distinct steps. 

Instead of having to carry out 
each step in turn, you could write an 
ARexx script that joined all these 
individual operations into one, 
effectively adding a new function to 



IN THE NOT SO DISTANT PAST 



ARexx (or simply 'Rexx' as trie 
original was known) was developed 
by a very clever chap called Mike 
Cowlishaw at IBM. Developed as a 
language that (in Cowlishaw's own 
words) was "designed for people, not 
machines", Rexx became an integral 
part of the CMS (Conversational 
Monitor System) user interface for 
IBM mainframes. Rexx enabled 
programmers and users alike to 
produce applications quickly and 
easily without the kind of mysterious 
error messages and unfathomable 



In the first of a regular series, 
Jason Holborn reveals the 
wonders of ARexx, possibly one 
of the most powerful aspects of 
Workbench 2.0 



the spreadsheet. As you can 
probably already start to appreciate, 
this sort of automation will not only 
speed up your work, but will also 
make the spreadsheet more powerful 
as several individual operations can 
be performed at once. 

TASK MEDIATOR 

As an extension to ARexx's ability to 
automate an application, it's also 
perfectly possible to 
use ARexx as a ■^^■^■■■^■a 



mediator between 
two (or more) 
previously 
incompatible 
applications. ARexx 
effectively sits 
between the two 
applications and 
passes messages 
between them. 

The best way to 
demonstrate this 
concept is by using a 
common example. 
Say, for example, 
you wanted to pull 

together an animation consisting of a 
series of ray traced frames but the 
package that you were using to 
generate these frames was not 
capable of creating animations itself. 
To get around this, you could use a 
second package that takes the 
output from your ray tracing program 
and pulls them together into an 
ANIM-format file. Now, this would 
usually involve a lot of work, but it's 
child's play to ARexx. 

Providing that both packages 
support ARexx, you could write a 
script that first instructs the ray 



"... ARexx scripts 

are often easier to 

write than similar 

programs written in 

a conventional 

programming 



language 



tracing package to load in a scene, 
generate the ray traced image and 
then save it off to disk. The script 
could then modify the scene (move 
the viewpoint, for example) and then 
instruct the ray tracer to render this 
scene and save it off to disk. The 
process would then continue 
automatically until all the frames 
were complete. Once this situation 
arose, the script would then instruct 

the animation 
mhmmbh program to pull in 
each frame one by 
one and then save 
out the resulting 
animation in ANIM- 
format. 

OK, this is not a 
perfect example of 
ARexx in action, but 
it does 

demonstrate how 
operations that 
usually require user 
interaction can be 
automated. If you 
were trying to 
construct a 
particularly complex animation using 
24-bit images, you could easily leave 
ARexx to do the job for you whilst you 
slept. In the morning you would 
(hopefully) find the final animation on 
your hard disk waiting to be 
displayed. Indeed, the only thing 
ARexx won't do is turn off the Amiga 
once its job is done! 



MULTIMEDIA AND AREXX 

ARexx's ability to control applications 
is by far the most powerful aspect of 
the language. Applications too can 



// 



syntax that most programmers had 
become used to. 

Rexx made its way on to the 
Amiga in 1987 thanks to William 
Hawes, the author of a number of PD 
and commercial Amiga titles 
including ConMan and WShell. The 
Amiga's multitasking operating 
system was perfect for Rexx since 
any application running under this 
environment could be treated as a 
host', enabling ARexx programmers 
to link applications together so that 
one application could control another 

take advantage of this. Take a 
multimedia authoring system, for 
example. Simply by coding a couple 
of ARexx scripts into the authoring 
system, you can extend its power 
immeasurably. If there's something 
that the authoring system can't do 



line 15 col JT 



CEDFilei HBYoCom.rexx 

RDPro Connunications script 

srgunents ; getcUp(ppuser_adargs) 

if args = " then exit 

parse war argunents width ';' (height ';' rendernode ';' filenane ';' node 



if 'shou(p. 'ftDPro') then 

call delavfll88) 
else 
do 

idstsrt s 1 

leave 
end 
early = 8 



if 'adstart then 
lo 

call setclip(ppuser_adclip, "8") 

exitjisgO 



:atl setcliplppuser.adclip, 



Don't worry If ARexx programs are 
meaningless to you - stick with us 
over the coming months and you'll 
be churning out ARexx scripts with 
the best of 'em 

but you have a package that can do 
the job, the authoring system can 
'sub-contract' the application to do 
the job for it, passing the results 
back once they're complete. 

GIMME MORE POWER 

Another very important (and quite 
exciting) aspect of ARexx is its 
expandability. 

Considering the kind of high 
power applications to which ARexx is 
suited that we've already discussed, 
you might actually be surprised to 
learn that the ARexx language itself 
is very simple indeed. This shouldn't 



and laborious tasks involving a 
number of different applications 
could be automated. 

Although ARexx has been floating 
around since 1987, support has 
been slow to arrive. Indeed, it is only 
with the recent general release of 
Workbench 2.04 that it has really 
started to gain the sort of acceptance 
that it truly deserves. Sure, 
developers embraced it with open 
arms simply because it suited their 
needs so well, but it remained a 
mystery to the rest of us for many 
years. Now that Workbench 2.04 has 
become the defacto standard though, 
I can guarantee you that you'll be 
hearing a lot more about ARexx. 

be considered a downfall though - in 
fact, it is probably ARexx's ace card. 
Because ARexx is based around 
a 'shared library' (that is, all its 
commands must be pulled in from a 
disk-based library file), it's very easy 
indeed to extend the language 

beyond recognition. 
There's already a 
wealth of add-on 
libraries for ARexx 
available in the 
Amiga PD libraries 
which enable you to 
code ARexx scripts 
to open windows, 
display requesters, 
perform database 
operations and 
even access Amiga 
ROM kernel 
routines. With this 
sort of support 
available, there's 
no reason why 
ARexx couldn't be 
used to code 
absolutely any application. 

PURSUIT OF PERFECTION 

Of course ARexx isn't perfect 
(although it's getting there). Because 
ARexx is an interpreted language, it's 
nowhere near as fast as languages 
such as C or assembler, so it 
wouldn't really be possible to code 
arcade games or any application 
which requires high speed 
calculations or data capture (sound 
sampling, for example). Then again, 
tasks such as data capture need 
only be handled by an ARexx library 
that passes the address of the 
captured data back to ARexx. 

As you see. ARexx is so flexible 
that there's always a way of 
getting around its self imposed 
limitations. Q^ 



NEXT MONTH* NEXT MONTH* NEXT MONTH 

Next month we'll be taking the first steps towards programming in ARexx. 
I'll show you how to print text on the screen, get an input from the user 
and much more besides. The wait will be unbearable, but I can guarantee 
you that it'll be worth it! Stay tuned. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



AMIGADOS 



Cracking 



Life, they say, is full of change; and with every change conies a 
transition (often painful) between the old and the new. Take 
AmigaDOS for instance - when Commodore revised and Improved 
the whole system, a lot of stuff went out and a lot of new things 
were introduced. However, for various reasons many people have bridged the 
gap by fitting two Kickstart ROMs to their machines. One boots AmigaDOS 
1.3, the other boots AmigaDOS 2 - but the two systems suffer from vast 
downward Incompatibility - not to mention a few bugs. 



LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 



Eclectic Startup-sequence (revised) 

1. ISTOO 

2. if warn 

3. C_l. 3 /ASSIGN C: SYS:C_1.3 

4. C : ASSIGN S: SYS:S_1.3 

5. C : ASSIGN DEVS : DEVS_1 . 3 

6. C : ASSIGN LIBS : LIBS_1 . 3 

7. C:ASSIGN L: L_1.3 

8. execute S: Startup-sequence 

9. endif 

10. ;The Workbench 2.04 startup continues here 



OOPS... 

The Eclectic startup-sequence (Amiga 
Shopper issue 16) was supposed to 
get around this problem - but as with 
most things Amiga, the situation 
became more confused than had 
first appeared. The idea was to 
check for a resident version of ECHO 
(only found from AmigaDOS 2) and 
select the appropriate Workbench 
automatically. Although the listing 
shown worked on the test machine, 
it did not work on many others - the 
main reason being a change to one 
of the commands. Here are the 
offending lines: 

1. which >RAM:temp ECHO 

2. search >NIL: RAMitemp J 
"RESIDENT" 

Under some versions of 1.3, the 
RAM disk is not reliable at this stage 
- so the program could be revised: 

1. which SYS:T/temp ECHO 

2. search SYS:T7temp 
"RESIDENT" 

However, as some of you might have 



already noticed this is not the main 
source of trouble. Under Workbench 
1.3, WHICH returns "RESIDENT 
xxxxx" and under 2.0x it returns 
"INTERNAL xxxx". Although this may 
sound trivial, it makes all the 
difference since the program relies 
upon that fact. In practice, the 1.3 
Workbench would always be selected 
and the test machine would always 
be running the wrong version of 
WHICH in its 2.04 C directory. This 
was my fault, and in recompense, 
here is a new AmigaDOS command 
which does work. 

When I say a command I mean 
just that - a tiny assembly language 
program which will fix that annoying 
ROM switch problem once and for 
all. Now I know many people get 
completely turned off by the thought 
of "machine code" and complain 
they haven't got an assembler - so I 
have provided some extra goodies to 
avoid all the pain. The extras are 
conversion programs written in ARexx 
(bundled with Workbench 2) to 
convert a hexadecimal dump of the 
program's binary into a real 
AmigaDOS program. They will find 



In the first part of an ARexx 
special, Mark Smiddy 
explains how to add a 
completely new AmigaDOS 
command to your system... 



other uses though. Since this is a 
two part feature. I'll be discussing 
those extra features later. 

In order to use the Eclectic 
startup-sequence, you must 
configure your hard disk with the 
correct directories and directory 
names (see Amiga Shopper 16 for 
details of how to do this). The 
revised startup is shown in Listing 1. 
All the hard work is done at Step 1. 
The program ISTOO (which should be 
present in the boot path or C:) 
returns a WARN condition if the 
machine is running Kickstart 1.3 and 
clear if it has 2.04 or higher. This 
allows the startup to make the 
appropriate assignments and boot 
the correct version of Workbench. 
The name incidentally, was coined 
after listening to an argument 
between two five-year-olds: "It's not 
yours" "Is too" "Tis not" and so on. 

Unless you have access to CIX 
(where the program is available for 
download in the Amiga Shopper 
conference) you will have to enter 
ISTOO yourself. If you already have 
an assembler, the program can be 



assembled directly from that. The 
prototype was developed using 
HiSoft Devpac 3. but just about any 
assembler including Cape 68K, 
ArgAsm and K-Seka should do the 
trick. The version listed here includes 
the LVOs and does not require the 
usual header files. 

If you don't have an assembler, 
you can use the ARexx HEX2BIN (hex 
compiler) to generate the command 
from the hex dump supplied. All you 
have to do is enter ISTOO.HEX in 
your favourite text editor and compile 
it with the ARexx program supplied. 
Assuming you have placed the hex 
code in S:, the command would look 
something like this: 

1>RX HEX2BIN SrHexDump J 
C: ISTOO 

HOW IT WORKS: 

ISTOO.S 

As my Editor would say, this is not a 
machine code tutorial - so this 
explanation will only touch the 
surface of what this program does. 
Even if you have never touched an 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



AmigaDOS - The most basic part of the Amiga's operating system - the 
collection of programs which take care of the general running 
of the machine. AmigaDOS concerns itself with device-handling: control 
of the keyboard, basic screen output, disk drives, printers and so on. 

Startup-sequence - A program which is executed every time the Amiga is 
switched on and after every reset. It sets up the system so that it is 
usable by the Workbench, and may be customised by those who have 
unusual hardware or software requirements. 



LISTING 2 


• LISTING 2 • LISTING 2 1 


ISTOO.S 








i. 


lea 


dosname(pc 


,al 


2. 


moveq 


#37, dO 


V37 doB = V2.04 ROMS 


3. 


move.l 


4,a6 ! 


get EXEC base 


4. 


jsr 


-552 <a6) ; 


call OpenLibrary 


S. 


tst.l 


dO ; 


version 37 opened? 


6. 


bne.s 


IsToo ; 


yes! 


7. 


moveq 


#5,d0 ; 


set DOS WARN 


8. 


rts 




return to DOS 


9. IsToo 


move.l 


dO.al ; 


DOS base to Al 


10. 


move.l 


4,a6 ; 


get EXEC base 


11. 


jsr 


-414 (a6) ; 


call CloseLibrary 


12. 


moveq 


#0,d0 ; 


Return normal exit 


13. 


rts 




return to DOS 


14. dosnamedc.b 


"dos . library" , 



00 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



AM I G A D O S 



assembler, you might want to read 
this description for more information. 
For the technically minded, it is re- 
entrant and re-executable (pure) so 
you could make it resident if you 
really wanted to do so. For safety, it 
does not make any assumptions 
about anything - hackers would have 
a good laugh at this strategy - but it 
works. Line numbers are for 
reference - they must not be entered. 

1. Stores the address (relative to 
where the program has loaded in 
RAM) of an ASCII string defined at 
Step 14 in Al. This is the name 
"dos. library" and it must be in lower 
case or the program will not work; 
this Kickstart "feature" can lead to 
some annoying bugs. 

2. Stores the value 37 in DO. This is 
the internal version number of the 
DOS library as returned by VERSION 
- not the Kickstart version number. If 
you are using ZKick and loading a 
ROM image into RAM, you might 
need to revise this to 36 - you can 
check this using: 

INVERSION dos. library 

while you have Workbench 2 and 
Kickstart 2 loaded, You only need to 
be concerned with the numbers left 
of the decimal point. 

3. Copies the value held at address 
4 into A6. This is called EXEC base 
and is the only absolute value in the 
entire system. Although its contents 
are liable to change, its position is 
not. 

4. Adds -552 to the value held in A6 
and jumps to that address as a 
subroutine. This is the entry point for 
the EXEC call, OpenLibrary, and this 
step asks EXEC to open the library 
whose name is pointed to by Al of 
version DO. In other words, 
dos.library V37. 

5. Step 4 always returns either "0" if 
the library opened or the address of 
the library base. This command sets 
a flag (a bit like the WARN flag in 
AmigaDOS) according to the contents 
of the return. 

6. This command branches to Step 9 
if the library opened correctly (a non- 
zero value was returned and found by 
Step 5). If not, it continues at Step 
7. 

7. Since the library version 37 did 
not open, this command places 5 
(WARN) in DO... 

8. ...and returns to AmigaDOS. 

9. The program gets here if the 
library did open and to be nice and 
clean, it should be closed before the 



program completes. (This isn't 
absolutely necessary for such a tiny 
program - but I believe in playing by 
the rules). To close the library, its 
pointer is copied from the return 
register DO to Al... 

10. EXEC base is copied back into 
A6, Again, not really necessary since 
A6 should already contain EXEC 
base, but this code is generated by 
the Devpac macros and only takes 
microseconds. 

11. Closes the dos.library for this 
task. Strictly speaking, dos.library is 
never closed, the program just gives 
back the rights to use it. See Step 4 
for more information; -414 is the LVO 
for EXEC CloseLibrary. 

12-13. Returns the all clear, EXIT OK 
to AmigaDOS. 

HOW IT WORKS: 

Hex2Bin 

Hex2Bin is an ARexx script - which is 
not AmigaDOS. However, ARexx and 
AmigaDOS are very closely related - 
much more so than AmigaDOS and 
AmigaBASIC. You can think of ARexx 
as an extension to the already 
powerful AmigaDOS scripting 
language and I will be including more 
of these in the coming months when 
the need arises. ARexx scripts are 
usually stored in the S: directory too. 
For direct comparison, let's assume 
you had made EX an alias for 
EXECUTE. Running an ARexx script 
and an AmigaDOS script looks 
almost identical: 

1>EX Hex2Bin Istco.HEX IsToo 
1>RX Hex2Bin Istoo.HEX IsToo 

The ARexx master process must be 
running first of course. You can 
usually accomplish this simply by 
placing it in your User-Startup file on 
Workbench 2. (Workbench 1.3 users 
can also use these programs by 
obtaining ARexx as an extra or better 
still, by upgrading to Workbench 2). 
The reasons these programs were 
written in ARexx rather than the more 
usual AmigaDOS is two-fold: ARexx is 
better at the job and an ARexx 
version is much shorter! You should 
enter this program using a text editor 
like ED and save it in REXX: or S: 
under the name HEX2BIN.REXX - but 
enough of that, here's how it works: 

1. All ARexx programs must start 
with a comment or ARexx will 
complain that it can't find the 
program. You can make the 
comment as long or short as you like 
but it must start with "/*" and end 
with "'/"just like C. 

2. This command takes the 
command line arguments and stores 
them in the variable, "com". (ARexx 



does not have a front-end template 
parser like AmigaDOS's EXECUTE so 
the programmer must supply his or 
her own). 

3. Sets the variable "infile" to the 
first word on the command line. This 
is the name of the input file to be 
converted, say RAM:lsToo.HEX. 

4. This line does the same as Step 
3, taking the second argument and 
storing it in Outfile. This is the name 
of the binary file to be created, say 
C:lsToo. 

5. This just checks you have 
supplied at least the two required 



arguments. If you miss one argument 
off, it gets swallowed by the variable 
"Infile". If both arguments are 
missed, the same thing happens, the 
test is true and control continues at 
Step 6. 

6. Warns of a bad argument 
template and provides help for the 
right one. If preferred you could use 
a two line script to let AmigaDOS 
handle this part (a better version will 
appear next month): 

.KEY lnFile/A,OutFile/A 

RX Hex2Bin <InFile> <OutFile> 

continued on page 94 



LISTING 3 • LISTING 3 • LISTING 3 



HEX2BIN.REXX 

1. /*REXX Convert HEX to executable with checksum */ 

2. arg com 

3. infile = word ( com, 1) 

4. outfile = word(ccjn,2) 

5. if outfile == "" then do 

6. say "Arguments not suitable for key - J 
RX HEX2BIN INFILE/a PROG/a" 

7. exit 20 

8. end 

9. if -exists (infile) then do 

10. say "Fatal - source file" infile "not found." 

11. exit 20 

12. end 

13. say "Converting: " infile "->" outfile 

14. openf 'hexin', infile, 'r') 

15. open( 'prog', outfile, w) 

16. sum ■ 

17. line = 1 

18. do while -eof ('hexin') 

19. hexline=readln( 'hexin') 

20. do X=l to words (hexline)-l 

21. long-word(hexline,X) 

22. do Y=l to 8 by 2 

23. writech ( 'prog ' , x2c ( substr ( long, Y, 2 ) ) ) 

24. if substr ( long, Y, 2) = " " then do 

25. say "Null (missing?) value in data" 

26. exit 10 

27. end 

28. sum=sum + (x2d ( substr ( long, Y, 2)) )«(Y+X) 

29. end 

30. end 

31. cksum=d2x(sum, 4) 

32. check=word(hexline,words(hexline)) 

33. if -eof ( 'hexin' ) then do 

34. if check==cksum then do 

35. say "line" line "correct" 

36. line = line +1 

37. end 

38. else do 

39. say "Fatal error in line" line "Check="check J 
"Result="cksum 

40. close ( 'prog' ) 

41. close ('hexin') 

42. exit 

43. end 

44. end 

45. end 

46. say line-1 "Lines compiled as " outfile 

47. close ('prog') 

48. close ('hexin') 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



91 



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continued from page 91 

7. Closes the ARexx script with a 
failure error return. 

8. Closes the IF construct opened at 
Step 5. 

9. Checks for the presence of the 
input file. 

This is directly equivalent to the 
AmigaDOS construct: 

IF NOT EXISTS <lnfile> 



(strings) and numbers; and ARexx's 
ability to do this easily makes the 
code much shorter than it might be 
in a conventional language. 

Some would argue this makes 
code harder to understand, but I 
disagree. 

ARexx is an everyman's language 
and anything it can do to make 
things simpler for the programmer is 
a good thing. 

17. Initialises the line counter 
variable to its start value. 



LISTING 4 • LISTING 4 • LISTING 4 



ISTOO.HEX 

1. 000003F3 

2. 00000000 

3. 43FA0026 

4. 4A806604 

5. 4EAEFE62 

6. 61727900 



00000000 
0000000D 
70252C79 
70054E75 
70004E75 
000003F2 



00000001 00000000 07B4 
000003E9 0000000D 11EA 
00000004 4EAEFDD8 37A3 
22402C79 00000004 4CB1 
646F732E 6C696272 7779 
8570 



in ARexx the tilde (~) is used to 
negate a test. 

10. Displays an error message... 

11. ...and quits the script. 

12. Closes the IF construct opened 
at Step 9. 

13. Assuming all has gone according 
to plan, this displays the opening 
progress message. Notice how in 
ARexx variables are assumed 
automatically? In AmigaDOS 2 this 
line could have read: 

ECHO "Converting: $infile J 
-> Soutfile" 

14. Opens the input file for read 
only. HEXIN (which must be enclosed 
in quotes) is a pseudonym used in 
ARexx Instead of a decimal file 
handle found in other languages. 
This construct is much simpler to 
use and aids readability. 

15. Performs the same operation as 
Step 14, only this time it opens an 
output file with the handle "PROG" 

16. Sets an initial value for the 
variable SUM. It's probably worth 
mentioning at this point that ARexx 
has "typeless" variables - the sort of 
thing that makes programmers of 
most other languages balk. 
AmigaDOS uses a similar, if more 
crude system. 

The idea is a variable can 
contain anything - text or numbers - 
and the interpreter decides which 
depending on the context in which 
those variables are used. As you will 
see later in this program, the same 
variables are treated as sentences 



18. Opens a DO. ..WHILE construct. 
This is a loop which will keep going 
until the end of the input file "HEXIN" 
is reached. 

19. Reads one complete line of text 
from the input file, HEXIN into the 
variable "hexline". 

20. Opens a DO loop which will loop 
once for each word in the "sentence" 
hexline. Typically this might look 
something like this: 

000003F3 00000000 00000001 
00000000 07B4 

Each "word" in the line is actually 
several bytes of hex code. The first 
four words are the code itself, the 
last word is the checksum. The 
variable X - which starts at one - will 
be incremented by one after each 
complete loop. 

21. The variable "long" is set to the 
word pointed to by position X. The 
choice of variable name reflects the 
fact four bytes (a longword) are being 
read from the string. On the first 
pass, using the previous example 
this variable would read: 

000003F3 

22. Opens another DO loop which 
will step the variable Y from one to 
eight adding two every complete 
loop: 1-3-5-7. 

23. This line looks quite complex at 
first glance, but in fact it's quite 
simple. Put simply it converts one 
byte from the hexadecimal longword 
in "long" and writes it to the output 
file, PROG. Let's break it down into 
some bite-sized pieces: 



1. HexByte=Bubstr(long,Y,2) 

2. Byte=x2c(HexByte) 

3. writech( 'prog' ,Byte) 

The first step takes two characters 
from the string in "long" starting at 
position Y. Using our previous 
example and assuming Y was one, 
HexByte contains "00". The second 
step converts the ASCII string "00" 
into a one-byte character equivalent 
- X2C is the ARexx function Hex to 
Character. Finally, at Step 3 this byte 
is written to the output file. You can 
see this part of the conversion in 
action by adding the following line 
between Step 23 and 24: 

say="Byte to convert:" J 
subBtr(long,Y,2) 

24. This tests for a space 
somewhere in the data. (This sort of 
error is unlikely because it's quite 
easy to spot, but it will not be caught 
by the checksum algorithm.) If a 
space is found where a value should 
be, execution continues at Step 25 
otherwise it jumps to Step 27. 

25. Prints a simple error message... 

26. ...and quits the script. 

27. Closes the IF construct opened 
at Step 24. 

28. Computes the current cumulative 
checksum. This line is quite complex 
at first glance so let's break this 
down: 

1. Hex=substr(long, Y,2) 

2. Byte=x2d(Hex) 

3. Byte=Byte* (X+Y) 

4. sum=sum + Byte 

Step 1 is the same as before - it 
takes the HEX value of the byte at 
the current position in the string and 
Step 2 converts this into a number. 
Next the byte value is multiplied by 
the sum of the X and Y position in 
the file - this prevents byte transpo- 
sition since the value generated 
depends on the position of the byte 
being read. Finally, that value is 
added to the cumulative checksum. 

29. Closes the DO loop opened at 
22. The value held in Y is 
incremented by two at this point and 
tested to see if it exceeds its preset 
value. 



30. This line closes the DO loop 
opened at 20. X is incremented by 
one here and tested to see if it 
exceeds the limit. 

31. Converts the checksum 
generated by the current line into a 
four byte hexadecimal value and 
stores it in "cksum". 

32. Reads the last word from the 
current sentence held in "hexline". 
This value is a checksum generated 
by the conversion program listed in 
the second part of this article. 

33. Tests the end of input file has 
not yet been reached. If it has 
control jumps to Step 45 otherwise it 
continues at Step 34. 

34. Makes sure the checksum 
generated by the compiled code is 
the same as the original. If it is 
control continues at Step 35, if not 
(something has gone wrong) it jumps 
to Step 38. 

35. Displays a progress message... 

36. ...and increments the line 
counter. 

37. Terminates the IF part of the IF 
construct opened at Step 34. Control 
now jumps to Step 44. 

38. Control reaches here if the test 
at Step 34 fails... 

39. ...and prints a useful status 
message... 

40-42. ...before closing down neatly. 

43. Terminates the ELSE DO block 
opened at Step 38. 

44-45. Tidy up the remaining 
constructs. 

46. Displays the closing message to 
say everything has gone according to 
plan... 

47-48. ...and close the currently 
open files. 

NEXT MONTH 

In next month's Cracking the Shell, 
I'll be explaining how the hex code 
was generated and supplying four 
more useful commands for 
debugging scripts. © 



Gotta Problem John? 



If you get stuck with AmigaDOS or there is anything specific you would 
like to see covered here, drop a line detailing your conundrum to: Mark 
Smiddy. Amiga Shopper, 30 Monmouth St, BATH. BA1 2BW. Sorry, no 
personal correspondence can be entered into. Desperate people, with no 
regard for telephone bills, can EMail me on CIX "SMIDOID". 



fkA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



AMIGA SUPER VALUE PACKS 



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MUSIC 



Tracking, that Is composing 
and creating sample-based 
songs for playing via the 
Amiga's sound chips, is one 
of the oldest of the Amiga's music 
areas simply because, right from 
the start, programmers needed a 
fast, convenient way of creating 
music for games and demos. One of 
the earliest utilities to appear was 
called SoundTracher and within a 
few years a proliferation of these 
'tracker' type clones had appeared. 



I • OctaMED Profassional ivl-i 



more development the promised 
professional version, OctaMED Pro, 
has been released. Now OctaMED 
Pro has a lot of facilities and, 
because a few general ME D-style 
tracking issues need to be 
discussed for the benefit of Amiga 
users who have never used one 
before, there isn't enough space to 
mention all of the enhancements. 
However, the following should give a 
good idea of what OctaMED Pro is 
capable of, and at the same time 
provide an 



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In-built sample editing is a big plus 
for OctaMED Pro 

Essentially programmers' tools, 
these utilities adopted programmer- 
like conventions for creating music 
sequences. Song descriptions 
tended to be built around lists 
showing the times and the pitches at 
which samples should be played. 
While not ideal from a musician's 
viewpoint this tracker method of 
composing music became 
established in Amiga circles and the 
race was on to create programs that 
were more powerful and user-friendly. 

In 1989 Teijo Kinnenun released 
a program called MED (Music EDitor) 
which allowed songs to be created by 
defining small blocks of music which 
could be linked. Blocks could be 
arranged and repeated in any way, 
so, once the blocks had been 
defined, building the song became 
easy. In April 1990 a MED Version 2 
was released which, among other 
things, provided a host of new 
editing facilities, a stand-alone song- 




The Synth Sound editor provides 
more OctaMED goodies 

player utility called MEDPIayer, and 
support for MIDI instruments. Up to 
this point these programs were PD 
but so much development work was 
being done that when a successor, 
OctaMED, arrived the decision was 
taken to make it a commercial (but 
reasonably priced) product. 

The good news now is that after 



introduction to the 
fascinating world 
of tracking. 

AN 
OVERVIEW 

The first thing that 
strikes you about 
Octamed Pro is 
the improvement 
in screen display 
layouts, because the program has a 
Workbench 2 style look - and of 
course runs under both Workbench 
1.3 and Workbench 2. There is also 
a much-improved file requester, 
options for input remapping, new 
BPM (beats per minute) timing 
options and a host of new MIDI and 
Player commands. 

OctaMED Pro contains many 
different screens but two areas of 
the display are always visible: a 
status bar which shows current edit 
modes, block/instrument numbers or 
names, and mute/play track status; 
and in the top right of the display a 
fifteen-button menu panel. Ten of the 
buttons display other control panels 
for loading and saving songs and 
instruments, setting relative track 
volumes, transposition character- 
istics, MIDI settings and a variety of 
block/track and editing facilities. 

The remaining five buttons 
switch between: a Block editor for 
entering note data in MED tracker 
format: a Graphic note editor, which 
lets you enter and 
display/print music 
a bar at a time 
using conventional 
notation; a Sample 
editor; a Synthetic 
Sound editor; and 
a Sample List 
editor. 

If you have the 
memory, up to 99 
songs can be held 
and even though such song sets 
need to share the same set of 
instruments OctaMED Pro can remap 
these when loading a new song. 
Most users will neither be able to, 
nor want to, work with such large 
numbers of songs but it is nice to 
have a few songs in memory 
because the editors allow copy and 
paste operations between songs and 
make it easy to re-use existing 



material. Compositions can be saved 
in a number of different formats: 
song files, files with song and 
instruments/samples, and modules 
containing multiple songs in a single 
file. Arrangements can also be saved 
in a Sound/ Noise/ ProTracker 
compatible form. MED started out as 
a four-channel tracker but OctaMED 
Pro provides splitting facilities which 
allow up to eight of the 16 tracks to 
be used with internal sounds 
(although sound quality suffers a bit 
when channels are split). 

Four types of OctaMED Pro 
instruments are available. There are 
the conventional sampled sounds 
which are played back through the 
Amiga's audio channels - here IFF 
8SVX and raw sample data can be 



be done. The basic tracker style of 
music entry hasn't changed although 
the display has improved since the 
early MED days and there is now an 
extra command digit available. The 
editor uses a spreadsheet-style two- 
dimensional grid of tracks and line 
numbers, where each line represents 
a l/16th note (every fourth line 
therefore represents a quarter-note 
or crotchet within a bar). The number 
of tracks visible on the display can 
be altered from four to sixteen but 
Figure 1 gives the general idea of the 
layout used... 

The data in Figure 1 are 
represented on the grid by a note 
description and a numerical entry. 
The example event shown (D#3 
20437) actually provides this sort of 
information to OctaMED... 




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.imposed by Nic Cusuorth 



TILES 
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1NSTR MIDI SVNTH 
BLOCK DJEHa StlPED 
EDIT flflllGt 

« ► 61/81 



888 G-2838888G-21 1 886811-2246868— 3888B8C-24BBeeBH-25b68B8—-bB8e68Dit2798B8B 
BB18-- 



882 -— 

883 — 

884 G-2 38888— 88888— 888B8IH-2 58888— 8B888H-2 68888--- 88888002 98888 

885 — 88888— 88888— 88888— 68888— 88888— 88868—- 8888J— 88888 



889 — 888B 

818 — 88888— 86888— 888661— 88888--- 88888--- 66868-- 68888— i 

811 — 88668— 86888—- 86888— 88868—- 66688— 88868— 66868-- 88888 

812 G-2 38668— 888881.-2 H8888H-2 5B888DII2 66888— 88888— e668BD»2 98888 
B13 --- 88888--- 88888--- 86888—- 66888-— 88888—- 86888—- 88688--- 88888 
814 — 68668-- 86888—- 88888— 6B888— 88868— 86888--- 86688— 88888 



Mm 7 WW 26S9872 I 

OctaMED Pro's Block editor in use. This Is where most of the block creation 
and song creation will be carried out 



used. Then there are the synthetic 
sounds which are special 
instruments constructed from pieces 
of waveforms whose pitch, vibrato, 
and arpeggio characteristics can be 
controlled by program instructions 
within a song. Third are 'Hybrid' 
sounds which are conventional 
samples controllable by program 
instructions. Finally OctaMED Pro 
supports the use of MIDI instru- 
ments and provides internal and 
external MIDI-clock sync facilities. 

Some useful MIDI facilities 
appeared with OctaMED and many 
new MIDI options have been added - 
as well as being able to use MIDI 
equipment as additional sources you 
can use an external keyboard to 
enter note data as you create songs. 

OCTAMED PRO EDITORS 

When the program starts up the 
lower half of the screen is occupied 
by the Block editor and this, for most 
users, is where the bulk of the block 
creation and song composition will 



D note 

#3 octave 

2 voice 

04 command (in this case speed 

and depth) 
37 other data (in this case speed 

and depth) 

Commands for things like volume 
control, creating arpeggios, slides, 
portamento, vibrato, hold and decay 
effects are provided for sampled 
sounds and there's a range of MIDI 
commands for setting controllers, 
sending pitchbend/modwheel and 
aftertouch messages and so on. The 
Block editor screenshot shows a real 
block description list. This approach 
is not too far removed from the track 
editing schemes used by MIDI 
sequencers such as DrT's KCS. 
One major difference is that 
these events control the playing of 
samples and so these event 
descriptions are not restricted to the 
playing of single notes. Suppose you 
want to create a repetitive drum part 



98 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



MUSIC 



containing bass drum, snare, open 
and closed hi-hats, and a couple of 
tom-toms. You could build it up using 
a number of tracks and perhaps even 
condense a good likeness of the 
finished part to a single track by 
eliminating a few of the drum beats 
that clashed. OctaMED Pro would 
still be doing a lot of work when 
playing that part and the seven drum 
sound samples would occupy a lot of 
space. An alternative is to program a 
MIDI drum machine to play the drum 
part and sample one bar of it. 
Nowadays most drum machines use 
high quality (16-bit) drum sounds. 
Sampling a pattern being played by a 
drum machine is a good way to get a 
decent drum track with the minimum 
of effort. The OctaMED Pro tracker 
programming for the drum track 



hi-hat voice), insert your one note per 
bar real sampled drum track, and 
adjust the program's playing tempo 
until the click track is in sync with 
your sample. Sampling one bar of 
music will produce a largish sample 
but it's unlikely to be as large as the 
space required for the individual 
drum samples. Another space/effort 
saver is to sample chords instead of 
notes because again this allows a 
chord backing track to be created by 
entering just single notes. 

Such tricks allow a lot of 
information to be placed on a couple 
of tracks with the minimum of effort. 
Given that an OctaMED Pro block can 
have as many as 256 lines and 16 
tracks this leaves a lot of track 
space for bass parts, melody lines 
etc, which can be entered more 



Sample editor. The latter is conve- 
nient because it allows you to remap 
sample frequencies and do all the 
usual types of ranged cutting/ 
copying and paste editing without 



an ARexx interface. 

If you have existing songs 
created by other trackers the 
Amiganut's AMFC (Amiga Music File 
Converter) utility is worth getting hold 



Figure 1 : A s 

-^ Lines >- 


[hematic layout of OctaMED Pro's block editing arrangements 


1 2 3 4 5 etc 


001 


MB 20437 












002 














003 














004 














005 














- 














- 















ever leaving the OctaMED Pro 
environment. You can also collect 
samples from any parallel-port 
sampling hardware. The Sample List 
editor is available for storing details 
of instrument names and locations. 



This month Paul Overaa moves 
away from pure MIDI matters to 
talk about the New OctaMED 
Professional tracker program 

F UNDATI M. 



H-»~ OctaMED ~Profosslon*l (vi.oo)- 



sees 



BLOCK TflBtr HI IMS K«N&r INSTB: »TH1 ' CUB* TILES ;M1SC 



WfCtCIv 
INSTB. NOTE: > «. -. OtI* oil* PL * 



2 * = S 



DEL 86'-»;4»BS 'LflV TRANSPOSE 

TCHT:g 

W6/8M 9 883 /81 2 12 Q *P ram i! ",'i!**6 r i I 



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BLOCK hmim SMPCP 
EDIT R&MGt 

life 81 <U 




-+<!U I 

■■■■ 
Graphic notation editor allows note data to be entered In conventional form 



becomes ridiculously simple - only 
one single note and one voice (the 
sampled drum track) per bar is 
needed no matter how complex the 
original drum part. 

You do have to take care with 
timing so the drum part synchronizes 
to the rest of the tracks. You can set 
the tempo of the drum part sample 
two ways: you can alter the OctaMED 
Pro event's note value (unlike other 
instruments small changes in pitch 
with drum sounds will not appear 
'out of tune'); or you can remap the 
sample using the sample editor. 

What then has to be done is to 
make sure that your one bar sample 
syncs with OctaMED Pro's idea of a 
bar of music. Here it is a good idea 
to lay down a temporary straight- 
fours click track (using say a closed 



conventionally. Melodies can be 
added in real-time by selecting a 
suitable voice and 'playing along' 
with the existing tracks. 

An alternative to the Block editor 
approach is the Graphic Notation 
editor which lets you enter, edit, 



OCTAMED PRO PLAYER 

This is a stand-alone program which 
allows OctaMED Pro compositions to 
be played. If, for example, you create 
a single OctaMED song and save it 
using the 'Song+Samples' file format 
then you can play it from a CLI/Shell 
window just by typing... 
OctaMEDPlayer <filename> 
If you want it to run as a separate 
background process AmigaDOS's 
RUN command can be used like this 
nan OctaMEDPlayer <filename> 
Insert this into a startup-sequence 
and you can kick off a piece of 
background music that plays while 
other programs are running. The 
player will run from the CLI/Shell or 
the WorkBench and can handle MIDI 
and OctaMED'% multiple song files 
as well as single songs. The new 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



DMA - Stands for Direct Memory Access and it is a hardware technique that 
enables data transfers to and from memory to be made without direct 
involvement of the Amiga's main 68000 processor. 

MIDI-Clocks - Special MIDI messages sent to provide timing information. 



play, and print music using stave 
notation. Having entered music in 
conventional note form you can 
switch to the block editor to add any 
special commands. In addition there 
is a Synthetic sound editor and the 



player cannot play existing MED 
songs but this is not a problem since 
earlier formats can be loaded into 
OctaMED Pro and re-saved in one of 
the new file formats. Among its other 
goodies the OctaMED player now has 



of because it automates music file 
conversion. 

LAST WORDS 

MED stood the test of time despite 
the limitations of early tracker 
programs. OctaMED Pro provides 
some major enhancements. MED- 
users will move to this with no 
problems and new users will find that 
life has never been easier. OctaMED 
Pro has good documentation on disk 
and there is now a printed user- 
guide. I would recommend it to 
anyone who needs a decent tracker. 



ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 

OctaMED Professional £22.50 

(includes disk documentation) 

Upgrade from Version 2 £12.50 

Printed manual £8.50 

AMFC Music File Converter ... £5.00 

All available from: Amiganuts United, 
169 Dale Valley Rd, 
Hollybrook 

Southampton SOI 6QX 
"010800722 2261 



CHECKOUT 
OctaMED Pro 



Ease of Use • • • • O 

Easy package to get to grips with. 

Features • • • • O 

More facilities than the original MED. 

Documentation • • • O O 

Much improved since early MED days - 
now has a very readable manual. Useful 
disk documentation is also still provided. 

Price Value • • • • O 

Hard to beat. 

Overall rating • • • • o 

Despite the fact that it is no longer as 
cheap as the original MED program, 
OctaMED Pro is an excellent buy. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



99 



MUSIC 




Paul Overaa takes a look at the 
new budget priced sampling 
package from City Beat.. 



Beat Studio Is produced by City 
Beat and I've had It on my desk for 
a good couple of months now. In 
fact when I first opened the box and 
saw a flimsy manual, a disk and a 
small cartridge (all too obviously 
destined to be shoved Into the 
Amiga's parallel port) I cringed 
because It looked like 'yet another' 
sound sampler. As It happens Beat 
Studio turns out to be a surprisingly 
good little package and one of the 
best new offerings I've seen for 
quite a while. Why? Because It is 
cheap, comes with some reasonable 
hardware and software, and most 
important of all - It does a perfectly 
adequate Job. 



The sampling cartridge looks well 
constructed and, like most such 
hardware nowadays, it works well - 
you plug the unit into the parallel 
port and forget about it. The software 
side of the package provides 
mono/stereo and simulated stereo 
sampling and has signal metering 
and the usual range of cut/paste 
editing options, including loop and 
zero point location facilities. There 
are real-time effects (including 
inversion, phasing, echo and 
compression), and RAM-scanning is 
provided which allows the Amiga's 
memory to be searched for samples. 
Samples can be loaded and saved 
both in raw and IFF 8SVX formats. 



Beat Studio, pictured to the left, provides a perfectly adequate working 
environment for sample taking and editing 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Clipping - Caused by a signal being too strong for the input stages of a 

recording or sampling device. The input circuitry gets overloaded and the 

top parts of the incoming waveform get distorted or chopped off - the 

end result is a poor quality sound. 
IFF 8SVX - This is the IFF (Interchange File Format) name of a file 

arrangement used for storing sound samples. 
RAM Scanning - This means exactly what it says - programs which provide 

RAM scanning facilities allow you to scan through the Amiga's memory 

and, by 'playing' the data, look for sound samples. 
Raw Sample - Basically a copy of the byte values of a sound sample just as 

they appear in memory (as opposed to a sample stored in a specially 

designed file structure such as IFF 8SVX). 



Sampling with Beat Studio is 
straightforward. Set the sample size, 
click on THRU to monitor the sound 
and adjust the volume of the signal 
to just below the level where clipping 
occurs. When you hit the record 
button a prompt appears telling you 
that sampling will begin as soon as 
you click on the left-mouse button. 
The software, although not 'state of 
the art' in terms of Amiga sample 
editing, works as it should and 
provides all the basic functions that 
are necessary to do useful work. 

BEAT STUDIO IN USE... 

The key to good sampling is a good 
input signal, so it is best to sample 
directly from source rather than with 
a microphone - this ensures a clean, 
strong signal. With good quality 
leads, direct sampling, and good 
signal strengths Beat Studio 
produces surprisingly good results - 
simply excellent. 

THE BOTTOM LINE... 

My only real niggle is that Beat 
Studio's manual is not particularly 
good. Someone new to sampling 
might well struggle, although anyone 
who has used a sampler before 
would get by. f j$ 




ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 

Beat Studio £29.95 

by Gty Beat 

Available from: 
Pandoal Marketing Ltd 
• 0234 843344 



CHECKOUT 

Beat Studio 



Ease of Use • • • O O 

An easy package to get to grips with. 

Features • • • O O 

Has all the basic facilities needed to get 
you into the world of Amiga sampling. 

Documentation • O O O O 
Barely adequate and should really be 
improved. 

Price Value • • • • O 

You are unlikely to find anything 
significantly cheaper. 



Overall rating 



>o 



Beat Studio performed very well and at its 
current price it deserves to win many 
friends. 



BEGINNERS • BEGINNERS 



SOUND SAMPLING... 

A musical note is made up of sound 
waves that have a certain pitch 
(frequency) and a certain loudness 
(amplitude). When you hear a piece of 
music, what you are listening to is a 
mass of sound waves which include 
many different frequencies and 
amplitudes. The result, in most 
cases, is a very complex waveform. 
Suppose you could 'freeze' the 
sound you were hearing and measure 
the amplitude of that part of the 
soundwave. Using some agreed 
convention you could then express 
that amplitude as a number. By 
repeating the process you would get 
a list of numbers, with each being 
the numerical equivalent of the 



m 



original sound. 

This is the idea 
behind sound sampling. By using 
special hardware which grabs and 
measures (digitises) that amplitude 
information many thousands of times 
a second it is possible to build up a 
very detailed digital copy of the 
original sound. 

This opens up a whole new world 
because computers can then be used 
to carry out sophisticated editing, 
making it possible to achieve effects 
which are impossible with 
conventional analogue recording 
techniques. You can take pieces of 
one sound and mix them with 
another, speed up or slow down the 
rate at which a sample is played, or 



BEGINNERS 
'START HERE 




even shift the 
time-position of a 
sample before adding it back to itself 
in a modified form. As you would 
expect, the quality of the result 
depends on the accuracy of the 
digitisation process and here there 
are two variables to consider: 
sampling rate and the resolution of 
the numbers used to define the 
amplitude. Fast sampling rates give 
better waveform detail. You can also 
improve quality by increasing the 
range of numbers used to represent 
the amplitude measurements. 

On the Amiga, amplitude 
digitisation is performed to an 
accuracy of 8 bits, so there are 256 
possible values. This is sufficient for 



producing some excellent playback 
sounds with the Amiga's internal 
sound chips, but not as good as CD 
technology sampling (which uses 16- 
bit resolution). This has limited the 
interest In Amiga sampling for the 
more demanding applications but, for 
non-professional use, Amiga samplers 
have caught on in a big way. All Amiga 
sampling software makes use of the 
IFF 8SVX sample format, so sounds 
captured with one program can be 
loaded and used with any of the large 
number of IFF-based music programs 
available. Basically all you need to get 
into the world of sampling is some 
digitiser hardware and the software to 
control it - and most of the Amiga 
sampling packages include both. 



100 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 




surma 



**#& )-' r - 



_ 



/>:o. 



MUSIC 



Take our sound advice 



T 



KB 



he perfect magazine about music technology would have... 

i 



2 




5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

♦ 



Authoritative reviews of the latest hardware and software, 
written by musicians who have used the equipment under the 
same real-world conditions you'd be facing. 

Expert technical advice and help on any problem to do with 
creating, recording and performing. 

Informative interviews with performers and sound crew, and 
profiles of prominent music personalities, giving you the 
professionals' tips on improving your music. 

Adverts packed with bargains, useful services, new releases 
and second-hand buys. 

News pages packed with previews, launches, opinions, 
updates, events and personalities. 

Easy-to-follow tutorials that show you how to get the most 
from your equipment and don't just rehash the manual. 

Comprehensive buyers' guides to all the existing hardware 
and software, regularly updated. 

Covermounts that are genuinely useful and superb value for 
money. 

The resources and commitment to quality of Future Publishing 
behind it. 

An experienced team of journalists and designers, determined 
to produce a top-quality magazine with no jargon, no technical 
waffle and no uninteresting pages. 

On Thursday 15 October Future Music will make all these 
things a reality, and much more besides. Don't miss it! 




Future Publishing -Your 
guarantee of value 

AS WELL AS THE FINE MAGAZINE YOU'RE 
reading right now, Future Publishing pro- 
duces more than 20 market-leading 
magazines, every single one of them with the 
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and PC Format, Future publish game console 
magazines like Sega Power and Total! and 
special interest magazines like Classic CD, 
Mountain Biking UK, Needlecraft and Photo 
Plus. Every one of our magazines is a market 
leader because we put you first and always 
strive to satisfy your needs. Future Publishing 
is your guarantee of value. 



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A limited number of refurbished ASOO/1500's 

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Also, ask about refurbished printers, 590 and 

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AMIGA 3000 

12 MONTH ON-SITE MAINTENANCE 

latest version, 68030 25MH-, 3.5" 880K FD ♦ spore drive bay (or 
4 spore boys on Tower),5l ffl 32 bil ROM, 4 Zorro m, slots with 2PC AI | 
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With Mettimdki Pod: AmigoVision, 




Deluxe Pint 4. 1 and Scola ADD £1 95.99 


Or with Pro Page 3 + Pro Draw 3 ADD El 65.99 


With extra 4MB Fast RAM (lifted il req»ired)ADD £1 69.99 


Witt PMps SVGA 28dpi mc. tilt t swivel A 


ID £259.00 


STARTER PACK 1 




MAXVALUE/RRP 


• 1 Blank Discs + 80 capacity lodtaUe disc box 


26.98 


• Mouse Mat 


4.99 


• Virus Killer Disk 


4.99 


• DPoint III or Home Accounts 


79.99 


• 4 disc DP pock inc. Fonts, Op Art and Disc Tutor 


9.99 


TOTAL VALUE 


126.94 



I 



WITH AMIGA/CDTV 17.99 
SEPARATELY 24.99 



NO OTHER DEALER CAN 
BEAT OUR CREDENTIALS 

> 8+ years experience in Commodore product and here to stay 

■ Commodore trained staff ore friendly and helpful and are 
parents, multimedia, educational, games, programming or 
technical specialists (usually more than one!) 

• Open 9-6 pm Monday to Saturday and 1 0.00 am to 4.30 
pm Sundays for convenient shopping. 

■ Callers welcome for advice and demonstration at our 1 600+ sq 
ft High St, Town Centre branches 

» Next day delivery for most orders received by 5 pm; express am 
and Saturday services available 

• Hordwore carefully handled and delivered safely and reliably 
by caged, insured, lop nome courier service 

• 1 00% pre-despotch testing on Amigas 

• Free 30 day, next day courier collection and delivery of NEW 
replocemenr.lexcept product with on-site maintenance) 

• Hotline support and in-house engineers 

• Upgrade and trade in offers to keep you up to date 

• Exceptional after soles service 



600 



A600 wrrh 1 2 month on-site warranty, 

1MB, WB 2.05, 3.5' FD + Smart Cord Interface 
WITH 
ALONE UK8833/CBM1084 
A600 264.00 444.00 

A600 20MB HD 434.00 609.00 

A6O0 20MB* 394.00 574.00 

A600 60MB* 494.00 674.00 

A60080MB* 534.00 714.00 

A600 120MB* 594.00 774.00 

2MB VERSION ADD £45 
WITH DELUXE PAINT III + GAME ADD £5 
See below/across for alternative software packs 
' Top quality 3rd party drives, covered by full 12 month retum- 
to-bose warranty 



OLD AMIGA TRADE-IN 

Tin best trade-in allowance, extra for peripherals and 
accessories. Trade in your oH agai n lor a brand new 
A600/ Al 500/2006/3000, CDTV or even a PC 



1 500 PACK 
EXTRA 

(ALSO FOR A500.A500+, 
A600 CDTV, 3000) 

VALUE/RRP 

The Works Platinum, word processor, spreadsheet, 

database 169.95 

Deluxe Point III with animation 79.99 

Got the most out of your Amiga book 9.95 

Hobbytc PD Greats Pack - see panel opp. below right 39.99 

4 disc DP pack int Fonts, Gp Art and Disc Tutor 

Puzinic 

laid 

Diqilal Home Accounts 

Elf 

Joystick 

TOTAL VALUE 



WITH AMIGA/CDTV 
SEPARATELY 



9.99 
24.99 
24.99 
29.99 
29.99 

9.99 
429.82 
49.99 
69.99 



REE 



S5g253& 



WHAT THE CUSTOMERS SAY 

..."extremely courteous ond rapid response to my problem*...*! will not 
hesitate to recommend you to my colleagues.' 

Dr Done! Moddy ■ Slough 
Thonk you for dealing so promptly with my requests.*...*! was reluctant 
about ordering my computer moil order. However I have been very pleased 
with my dealings with Hobbyle -you ore to be commended for your 
customer servke." 

Trevor Patterson - Bangor 
*We have dealt with many of the leading computer suppliers, in the post, 
but the service you provided was secondto none.' r w » 1 Pmsioa 

...Thonk you for everyone's good service'...' it arrived ot 7.20om the next 

morning.' 

David J Thomas - Wolverhampton 

"I was very impressed with the service I received in the first instance, I 

really appreciated how quickly you monoged to get the printer despatched 

from your luton branch for me." . . - .. . . 

' i S Cozodinm - Amorsnam 



aiuurcus-o-ne"- 



ftise'P" 






WE WANT TO 
■AT ALL PRICES! 

CALL US!! 



[AMIGA 1500/2000 

K spec with 1 MB RAM, mouse, expansion as 2000, leads, manuals. New 
including Kkkslorl 8 Workbench 2.04. 

Hard disc configuration inc. the high performance GVP II controller cord, 
EXPANDABLE TO 8M8. Fost reliable 52MB + 1 20MB Quantum Drives ore used. 
ALONE WITH WITH 7CM 

8833/1084 +M/W FFIXER 

Dual Drive 485.00 662.00 889.00 

DD+GVP+20MB HD 699.00 879.00 1099.00 

DD+GVP+52MB HD 765.00 949.00 1169.00 

DD+GVP+120MBHO 908.00 1092.00 1299.00 

Per extra 2MB fitted to GVP ADD £60.00 

Also with Kickslart 1.3 + ROM Sharer ADD £39.90 

Also with XT/AT BB for PC compatibility ADD £95/£2O0.00 



CDTV 



1MB, with Disc Caddy, Welcome CD + tutorial + remote control unit. 

AS ABOVE WITH MATCHING DRIVE 

KEYBOARD, MOUSE + WB 1.3 
As above £299* £349* 

With Goldstar Block TV .£458* £508* 

monitor + remote eoatiol 

Extra RAM £P0A 

* When you node in your old Amiga 500 - 
phone for details. 
For price without trade in ■ please phone 

See below/across for software packs 



fR0 



THE HOT LOT PACK MKII 

(1MB REQUIRED) 

VALUE/RRP 

• Cartoon flossies Games: Lemmings OR Elf 25.99 

The Simpsons Toki 24.99 
Captain Planet Punnk 25.99 

• Deluxe Paint III with animation 79.99 

• 10 GREAT individually packaged gomes, previous 269.82 
RRPs up to 39.99 each, phone to choose from current list, or 
leave it to us! Children's games available. 

• Hobbyte PO Greats Pock n -see insert 39.99 

• 4 disc DP pack rnc Fonts, Gp Art and Disc Tutor 9.99 

• Dust Covert mouse mat 9.98 

• 1 Blank Discs + 80 Capacity Disc Box 26.98 
Microswitch turbo joystick 9.99 

TOTAL VALUE 523.71 

WITH AMIGA 59.99 

SEPARATELY 
SPECIAL: ALSO 10 extra great gomes ADD 25.00 



PROFESSIONAL 
FAMILY PACK 

(1MB REQUIRED) 

VALUE/RRP 

• Cartoon Qossio Games: Lemmings 25.99 

The Simpsons 24.99 

Coptain Manet 25.99 

• Deluxe Point m with animation 79.99 

• Trie Works Platinum Word Processor, Spreadsheet 

ond Database 169.99 

• Ed the Duck 29.99 
OR Bode to the Future ond Postman Pat (1 .3 only) 

OR Digital Home Accounts 

• Virus Killer Disk 4.99 

• Hobbyte PO Greats Pack -see panel opp. below right 39.99 

• 4 disc DP pock inc. Fonts, Op Art ond Disc Tutor 9.99 

• Hobbyle Infant, Junior (specify) or Secondory 

Educational Park 19.99 

• 10 Blank Discs + 80 Capacity lockable disc box 26.98 

• Mouse Mat + Dust Cover 9.98 

• Joystick 9.99 

TOTAL VALUE 478.85 

WITH AMIGA/CDTV 79.99 
SEPARATELY 
SPECIAL: Also with Star LC 200 9 PIN 
Colour Printer and Starter Pack ADD 1 79.00 

Also with Citizen 224+24 Pm 
Colour Printer and Slorler Pock ADD 230.00 



• AMIGA SPECIALISTS • STAR G 






COMMODORE 386SX 
GAMES + WP PACK 

CBM 386 16MHZ, 40MB HO, 1MB EXP TO 
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• Mouse 

• 8 entertainment titles: Wing Commander, Hard Drivin 2, Mig 29, 
Trivial Pursuit, Escopo from Hit Planet of the Robot Monsters, 
Piilighlcr, Castle Master, Super Space Invaders 

• Secretory Bird WR Spreadsheet, Dolobose 

• DOSS 

• User Friendly Front End Icon Menu CA/IO* 

• Full 1 year on-site worronly JfcO"t# 



Also with Star LC 24-20 Printer, lead, 
paper ond printer stand 



£824* 



•WITH 1MB A500 PART EXCHANGE!! 
- PHONE FOR DETAILS! 

COMPUTE RANGE OF PCS t NOTEBOOKS AVAILABLE 



A30OO24BIT 



THE ULTIMATE!! 

• Extra 4MB Fast RAM • Progressive 68040 accelerator! 

• 24 bit colour cord • Vlob 24 bit colour real time digitiz] 

• 24 bit 3D Art + animation s/w 

• Fitting ond Free 1/2 day customised training 

TOTAL RETAIL PRICE OVER £6,00<| 
HOBBYTE PRICE £3995 INC 



G650/40 

A3 postscript colour ink jet printer, 8MB wilh starter kit ' 

HOBBYTE PRICE £7349 IMC VAT 



ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS 
PACK 3-9 YEARS 

VAIUE/RRP 

• Fun School 2, under 4 years, 6-8 years or 8+ years 19.99 

• Fun School 3 or 4, specify under 5 years, 5 to 7 years or 
7+ yeors. 

- 1 2 stunning UK educational games with beautiful 

pictures, exciting animation ond music that helps to develop 

number, word and other skills. Up to 6 skill levels. 

Conform lo National Curriculum requirements. 24.99 

• Postman Pal ( 1 .3 only), OR Edd the Ouck (7+ yeors) OR 
Matched Pairs OR Blinky's Scary School 14.99 

• Hobbyle Infant or Junior (specify} Educational Pock, 
featuring up lo 1 2 "Learn while you pfay" gomes 1 9.99 

• Hobbyle 30 Easy Children's Games, 10 pack disc 
including Train Set and other lop entertaining PD titles 1 9.99 

4.99 

9.99 

89.99 

9.99 

216.91 

49.99 

69.99 



10 Blank Discs 

Joystick 

Deluxe Paint H/Photon Paint rj or Bl or Puzznic 

4 disc DP pock inc. Fonts, Op Art ond Disc Tulor 



ITAL VALUE 
WITH AeWiGA/CDTY 
SEPARATELY 

SPECIAL With 3 great boxed gomes and Dpaint Ml + 
animation instead of Dpainl ll/Photon Paint II (1MB tea.) 

VALUE 80.00 
ADD 16.99 



AMOS 
PROGRAMMER'S PACK| 

(1MB REQ.) 

VALUE/Rj 
EASY AMOS • complete, simplest possible, fun-lo-use beginnei 
programming course. Learn to write professional looking 
arcade games, educational, etc. software in weeks, not years.! 
Complete wilh graphics, sound, animation and more. 
OR Amos the Creator. 34.9) 

Cortoon Classics Games: OR 

Lemmings FJf 2S.9 

Captain Planel Puzznik 25.9| 

The Simpsons Digita Home Accounts 24.9 

Hobbyle PD Greats Pack - see panel below right 39.9 

20 Blank Discs + 80 Capacity LockableDisc Box 33.9fl 

Mouse Mol.Dust Cover & Microswilch Turbo Joystick 1 9.971 
'Get the Most out of Your Amiga' book 9.951 

TOTAL VALUE 215.841 

WITH AMFGA/CDTV 64.991 
SEPARATELY 79.99 1 



TRAMPY'S OR THOMAS'S 
PACK 

2-9 YEARS 

AT LEAST 57 EDUCATIONAL/FUN FILLED GAMESI 

MAX VAIUE/RRP 

• Tho Shoe People - 6 colourful ond entertaining gome* 29.99 
featuring Trompy and friends to encourage early number 
reading and pre-reading skills. Wilh Shoe People music 

OR Thomas the Tank Engine's Fun wilh Words - 6 separate eosy 
to use learning programmes wilh animation ond sound. 

• Shapes and Colours - Bobby ihe Clown enlertoins and 
lays down the foundation for maths and writing in 6 
colourful animated games. 

• Fun School 2, 3 or 4 - the "Fun School" suite hove won 
just aboul every award going. 5 or 6 wonderful 
animated games. 

OR Picture Book: 4 colourful and amusing games from 
ex 'Fun School' design manager will delight young children. 



9.99 



24.99 



Deluxe Paint II/Phoion Point II or FJf or Puzznic 
Hobbyle Infant Educational PD Pack, containing 10 
fun while you learn games 
Hobbyle 30 Easy Children's Games Pack 
10 Blank Discs, Disc Box, Joystick, Mouse Mat 
4 disc DP pock inc. Fonts, Gp Art and Disc Tutor 
TOT" - ' 



89.99 
19.99 



19.99 
24.94* 
9.99 
231.89 
49.99 
69.99 



TOTAL VALUE 
WITH AMIGA/CDTV 
SEPARATELY 
SPECIAL: With 3 great boxed gomes and Dpaint III + 
animation instead of Dpainl ll/Pholon Paint II (1MB req.) 

VALUE 80.00 
ADD 16.99 



ARTISTS DTP/CAD PACK 

VALUE/RRP 

• Deluxe Paint HI with animation (upgradeable to DP IV) 79.99 

• Power 400dpi scanner with Powerscon professional s/w 99.99 

• 10 disc Hobbyle PD Graphics Pock inc. dip art + utilities 39.99 

• Cartoon Classics Games: OR 

lemmings Elf 25.99 

Caploin Planel Puzznik 25.99 

The Simpsons Digita Home Accounts 24.99 

• Hobbyle PD Greats Pack -see panel below right 39.99 

• 20 Blonk Discs + 80 Capacity LockableDisc Box 33.97 

• Mouse Mol.DusI Cover & Microswilch Turbo Joystick 19.97 

• 'Gel the Most out of Your Amiga' book 9.95 

TOTAL VALUE 400.82 

WITH AMIGA/CDTV 139.99 
SEPARATELY 169.99 

AS ABOVE, PLUS PRO PAGE 3 AND PRO DRAW 3 

VALUE 449.00 
ADD 149.00 



J 



Nr 



ACCESSORIES 

Blitz virus protector + backup devke for ony external drive 23.99 

A520 Modulator 1 9.99 

A5O0 Deluxe control centre 44.99 

A400 Control Centre 29.90 

CDTV Keyboard 39.99 

MODEMS 

Amstrod SM 2400 Modem 1 18.99 

Supra Fox 2400 + 5 year warranty 78.95 

Supra Fax 2400 Plus 1 5 year worronly 137.95 

FLOPPY DRIVES 

Zydec 3.5 external drive, doisychain + on/off 48.95 

Cumano CAX 354 3.5 exlemol drive, beige 52.99 

CDTV external 3.5 drive, block 49.99 

PC 880B with onli dick t Blitz back up ond virus protector 47.95 

PC 880B os above, Cyclone compatible ..78.99 

Dual drive os PC 8B0B ..1 15.95 

MOMIORS/ACCESSOWES 

CBM 1084SDI monitor + leads 194.99 

Philips UK 8833 MKII mon.+lecnk+fTurbo Challenge + on-sfle) 199.00 

Till + swivel stand for Philips 8B33 12.99 

Philips 3332 FSTTV/Monilor 238.99 

CBM 1 940 High res monitor 379.99 

Philips 7CM Hi-res SVGA ,28dp inc till & swivel 259.99 

NEC 4FG Multi-Sync 544.99 

Miaowoyftdcer Fixer 135.99 

ICD Flicker Free Video 2-A500 197.90 

SCANNERS & DIGITISERS 

Epson GT 4000, 600dpi 24 bit A4 982.99 

Epson GT 8000,800dpi 24 bit A4 1 192.99 

Power Hand Scanner, 400 dpi, 44 Grayscale, Powerscon software 88.99 

Power Colour Hond Scanner 219.49 

Sharp JX 100 A4 Scanner + sconlob s/w up lo 18 bit 469.99 

Sharp JX 320A4 Scanner t s/w up to 24 bit -..898.99 

Vidi Amiga 1 2 .77.99 

GENLOCKS 

Oil-- 6802/8804 POA Roger, Plus 11449 

(lsMRandole8802SVHS 529.99 Progen 85.99 

Rocgen 78.95 HdeoF_v330 994.94 

DISCS 

10 Blank DS/DD discs in box..6.99 50 Blonk DS/DD discs 17.99 

1 Blonk DS/HD discs 8.99 50 Blank 0S/HD discs 27.99 



ACCELERATORS/HD 
A500/600 

_458.99 Feeds Rorhord 40MB 



A530IMB52MB 658.99 Fccd9cltochard40MB___16Z99 

A5301MB105M8 827.99 Isodec rCodnd 60MB 256.99 

A5301MB24OMB 1017.99 R«lK|!«hrj.80MJ) 326.99 

A53068882 227.99 Fcodec Rochord 120MB 362.99 



GVPHD852MFL 
GVPHOB120MB 
GYP HD8 240MB 



...344.50 ASM 20MB 259.99 



__4*3.99 A570 lor 2.04 1 MB 500 309.99 

725.99 IVSTriirp_d42MBH0 279.99 

Per extra 2MB fitted lo ony of the above 62.99 

ACCELERATORS/ 
HD A1 500/20000/3000 

(WSeriesl)52MB___ 278.99 G Force 030 40MHZ 4MB 889.99 

GVPSeriesll 105MB- 416.99 GFcra03050MHZ4M8_.1259.99 

GVP Sarias « 240MB ______.643.99 Fty_0»2rMfZ4W 1739.99 

GFcrce03025MHZIMB 539.99 FnjjMamryOI028MHZ(3CrX)1349.99 

Per extra 2MB fitted to ony of the obove - -62.99 



1 .3 TO PLUS UPGRADE 

Chip filling and board upgrade available, by 

out qualified engineers or Pff kit,,.,, „„. , ..,,,, POA 



EMULATION 

KCS Powerboord 174.99 GVP 284 for GVPII +530 ....216.99 

KCS Powerboord wilh DOS ..1 99.95 XT Bridgeboard for 1 500 99.00 

KCS adaptor 69.50 AT Once 214.99 

AT Bridgeboard fori 500 329.99 GYP 40/4 lor 1500 945.99 

Vortex 386sx 25MHz 438.99 



WITH WITH 

ALONE STUtm ALONC STMTHc 

PACK PAW 

Otizen 1 20+D 1 08.99 Citizen Swift 24e 239.25 

Star LC20 117.25 o« Gtizen Swift 24e col' .248.25 o« 

Star LQOO col 167.25 o- Star XB 24/200 col" ..347.99 » 

GtizenSwifl9 _147.25 • Slot XB 24/250 col". .41 6.99 • 

Star LC 24-20 177.25 «•* HP Deskjet 329.99 «"* 

Star IC 24-200 197.25 "~ HP Deskjet col 509.99 *~ 

SlorLC 24-200 col 239.99 w HP PaintJet 429.95 **' 

Gtizen 1240 174.99 a BJ10exBubblejelporl.204.99 Q 

Gtizen 224 205.99 _. BJ 300 ..338.99 _ 

Citizen 224+col* 218.99 «« Star SJ 48 _ 204.99 «t 

STARTER PACK: 500 Sheets A4 or continuous paper, Amiga to 
printer lead & Universal Printer Stand • with new driver 



GRAPHKS/CAD 

hUm .47.50 

Art Dept. Pro 2.1 ...98.99 

Deluxe Paint III 9.49 

Deluxe PoinllV 53.99 

Expert 4DJunior...34.99 

Expert Draw 48.99 

Imagine v2 184.99 

Pro. Draw 3 69.99 

Real 3D Beg 1.4 ...83.99 
Real 3D 

Turbo Pro 1.4 ...229.50 

Scalo500 68.99 

Scola MM200 434.99 

ScolaProl,13....173.50 
Sculpt 

Animate 4D 198.99 

Spectra Colour . — 57.99 

X CAD 2000 89.50 

X CAD 3000 238.90 

VIDEO PRODUCTION/ 
TITLING 

AmigaYrsion 47.50 

Broadcast 

Tiller II 148.99 

Deluxe Photolob ...51.49 
Pro Video Plus ...137.99 

TV Show Pro 51.39 

TV Text Pro 68.99 

Video Director 106.99 

Walt Disney 
Animator 63.99 



SOFTWARE 

EDUCATIONAL 

Any Fun School ....15.50 

AnyADI 17.50 

See also software packs 

UTILITIES/ 

LANGUAGES 

AMAXIIPIus 289.99 

Amos3D.._ 21.49 

Amos the Geolor ..30.95 

Amos Compiler 19.49 

Eosy Amos 22.49 

Cross Dos v5 22.75 

Disk Master II 43.75 

GFABosic 17.99 

Lattice Cv5.7 147.99 

Quarter bock 34.50 

Quarter bock Took 44.99 
APPLICATION 

Arena Accounts 89.50 

Excellence 3 88.99 

final Copy 47.49 

Kind Words III 35.99 

Maxiplon Plus v4 ..38.99 

Mini Office 43.99 

Pogestreom 2.2. .122.99 

Pogesetter II 42.49 

Pen Pal 1.4 52.50 

Personal finance 

Manager Plus 31.99 

Pro. Page v3 137.99 

Saxon Publisher POA 

Superbose Pro 4.148.99 

Wordsworth 69.99 

Works Platinum ....49.95 



MUSIC 

AD 10 12 Studio 16 

Sampler 349.95 

Audio Engineer 

Plus 2 Sampler. 188.99 

Audio Master 4 44.49 

Bars 8 Pipes 

Prol.OE 172.13 

GVP Digital 

SoundSludio 48.99 

Midi Interface 19.95 

Rombo Megamix .23.99 

24 NT 

A Video 24 with TV Paint 

for 500 588.90 

ArtDept. 

Pro2.1A 174.99 

DCTV 395.99 

Firecracker POA 

GYP Impact Vision 

24bfl cord 1545.95 

Harlequin 4000 

24 bit cord 1498.95 

Image Master...l049.00 
OpalVision 24 bit board 

+ Opal Paint, Opal 

Presents , Karate 24 bit 

software _839.95 

Rembrandt 

24 bit board.. 2489.99 
V lob 24 bit real time 

digitiser 279.99 



• HP AUTHORISED DEALER • CITIZE 



Amiga rimes. WeptlwhcfcUtatci 

ITIZEN DEALE 



ORDERING: 
TELISAUS HOt (0727) 56005 

Next day dekvery for credit card orders placed before 4.30pm subject to availability. Alternatively send cheque, postal order, 
bonkers draft or offklol order (PLCs, Education and Government bodies only) to; Dept. AS, Hobbyle Computer Centre, 1 Market 
Ptece, St. Albans, Harts A13 5DG. Pfaose alow 7 wortdng days for cheque demace. Subiecf to moikibility, despatch is normally within 
24 hours of receipt of deared payment. Prkes ore correct c«rrarfgcir(jlo|x_,ricwMi,weaesomermBlc«cedlocr««n5 
them, either up or down. Please check before ordering. Additional servkes and different packages may ho offered h out showrooms, 
ond prkes may wry from Mail Order prices. Petsonol callers are asked to quote this ad to ensure MoS Older prxkaoes are offeract. 

DC-VERY OUIOfS: UK MAINLAND (NOT HIGHLANDS) 
Smol corBumcWes & DespatcJied by past, pteose check 

software items charges when entering 

Other items, except losers Next day courier service. El per box 

OtTshmaruHtftn.' Pease enquire 

IN ADDITION WF OFFER THE FOLLOWING EXPRESS SERVICES: 

Soiurday deliveries Normal rate plus .1 5 1 VAT per box 

Am next day Normd tale phis £8 + VA1 per box 



NO DEPOSIT 



Credit letim 01 34 8". APR (voi table) « 

btoitongedfoi pwthosesovei CISC vut> 

(0 *tulus tompelilive leaving uhpmes in 

okc available loi buvmettev including ui 

liod*f. aftrf «iflnenhi(M Just telephone I 

lail. nndapplitalion foim 



COMMS 



OUlIi LlriC 14,400 Hi! 

DIG PROFESSIONAL 
24 HOURS 



FOR THE OEVHOWIEIII BUD SUPPORT 

ihe onion oohpuier c ii-s sofiuBi 



The title screen from 01 for Amiga, probably the 
best Amiga BBS In the world 



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Chlba City - the Cyberpunk feel begins at the 



There are a host of bulletin 
boards all over Britain, 
many of which cover the 
Amiga to some extent, 
many exclusively. But finding out 
which ones you should visit can be 
very difficult. To help you, we've 
come up with three different boards 
for you to take a look at. All three 
offer something for the Amiga owner 
and are well worth a look for 
different reasons. Let's visit 01 for 
Amiga, Guru-lO and Chiba City. 

First stop, a board a lot of people 
will have already heard of, 01 for 
Amiga. 



01 FOR AMIGA 



01 for Amiga (01 to its friends) has 
been around for no less than six 
years. It started life on an Amiga 
500, running a system called BBS- 
PC. It has over 1500 members now 
and runs on an Amiga 3000 with 
some RAM and a hard drive, using 
the Dialog Professional BBS system. 
Recently a CD-ROM drive was added 
to the system. 

The CD-ROM has facilitated the 
addition of all the Fish disks, yes all 
of them! There is also an on-line 
database which enables users to 
find any program on the disks and 
then download it. This is a superb 
service which makes it well worth 
subscribing to the system. 

01 is one of the few Amiga 
boards to offer a subscription 
service. The subscription fee is 
purely optional and there are three 
grades, £5, £10 and £20 plus. Each 
of these three rates gives you 
different access times and 
upload/download ratios. The nice 
thing is that there is absolutely no 
pressure to subscribe, but if you do, 
the benefits are worth it. 

Subscription also gives you 
access to a couple of subscribers- 
only lines which will prove to be very 
handy. 01 is a very popular board 
indeed. Although the board has 
several lines, these are very often 
engaged, so access to the other 
lines alone is worth a fiver, and 
access to the Fish collection can be 
invaluable. 



else Is on-line. It's the expensive rate at the moment so main menu and continues throughout the board 
it's Just me and the sysop 



01 also has a special "Guest" 
user option which enables you to 
take a look round the board without 
having to go through the quite 
lengthy registration process. This 
comes in very handy, and it would be 
nice if more boards used this idea. 
To visit the board as a guest, use a 
name of "guest" and a password of 
"guest" when you call the board. 

FILES GALORE 

But what do you get on the board 
itself? There are no less than sixty 
files areas including comms, 
JRComm, NComm, BBS software, 
printer related files, CLI utilities, 
Workbench utilities, editors, CanDo 
and AMOS, amongst others. There 
are also some more obscure areas, 
X-CAD and EMC Fonts to name but 
two. 

Of course a board this big can't 
do without messages. There are 27 



Treading 
the boards 



constantly changing. With this much 
traffic you won't get anywhere 
without an off-line reader. As has 
been mentioned before, an off-line 
reader enables you to download 
unread messages from areas you are 
interested in and read them at a 
later date. This saves you money and 
enables you to participate fully in all 
the echoes you want. We'll be 
covering off-line readers in more 



LET YOUR FINGERS DO THE WALKING... 



I've had many requests for more BBS numbers, hopefully In the future we 
will be able to bring you a full list, but for now, here's a few UK boards you 
might like to try... 



Chiba City 

01 for Amiga 

Guru 10 

Meridian Amiga BBS 

Yukon Ho! 

The Amiga Forgery 

Protocol BBS 

Theatre West End 

Ponty BBS 

061 developments UK 

Saxon 

Cliffnet 



0501 44262 
071 377 1358 
0738 52063 
0273 588924 
0232 768163 
0908 604229 
0403 272931 
0625 828795 
0443 409882 
061 799 4922 
0273 308800 
0642 467324 



If you give some of these a ring, there are bound to be others listed on 
those boards. Eventually you'll end up with a massive list, and a phone bill 
to match. 



message areas, many of which are 
Fidonet echoes. These message 
areas include some more rare topics, 
such as Transamiga BBS echo, 
Welmat and ICPUG. 

There are about 6,500 
messages on the board which are 



detail in a future issue. 

01 also features live 
teleconferencing facilities. This 
enables several people who are 
currently calling the board to enter a 
conference room and hold a real 
time conversation. 



CONSIDER A 
CONFERENCE 

Conferencing Is a fun idea, but it 
really needs to be prearranged 
before it becomes interesting. For a 
conference to occur, several people 
have to be in the "conference room" 
at the same time - this seldom 
happens by accident. 

It would be nice if 01 could 
arrange guest nights where special 
guests from the Amiga industry could 
be in the conference room to field 
questions from callers, a sort of 
electronic phone-in. Unfortunately, 
this sort of thing never seems to 
happen in the UK, perhaps if anyone 
from 01 is reading... 

CONCLUSIONS 

01 for Amiga is an excellent board. 
The sysops and callers are true 
Amiga fans and you're highly likely to 
meet well known names from the 
Amiga world, particularly 
programmers and journalists. 

The only complaint I have is that 
the menus are a bit bland and the 
organisation a little sloppy. Text files 
tend to scroll off the screen before 
you get a chance to read them 
properly, that sort of thing. It doesn't 
detract from the board too much 
though and the content more tfian 
makes up for it. 



GURU- 10 



The second board we're going to 
take a look at is the Guru-10 BBS, 
an Amiga and PC board, based on a 
PC using the Remote Access 
software. Remote Access is a very 
popular and reliable BBS system, 
used by a lot of PC boards these 



106 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



COMMS 



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Ending Stony 
IfllllD Hapnu 



1) !,p«:e Enpine Cane 1 2> Space Enpir? Gane 2 
A) S I B S I HUM 5) PafaUonld Mmntw* 

n) Ulster Ulna 

D) L G.n.PMpH II Infi«l 

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F) Ifcuga fisit Oiifc ViM-tr X) In* lint Bank 



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Chlba City's strongest point Is on-line games. You 
can also get to the Fish database and the time 
bank from here 



The Guru-10 main menu, including that useful virus 
database, too bad it's for the PC 



The Guru-10 games area, not as many as Chlba 
City has, but it does have 'Inter BBS' games 



This month our comms expert, 
Phil Harris, takes a look at three 
Amiga bulletin boards - Chiba 
City, 1 for Amiga and Guru- 10 



days. It also has a variety of useful 
utilities available for it which make 
for interesting boards. 

Guru-10 has a pretty short 
registration sequence but you are 
then asked at the main menu to fill 
in a second "form". This asks for 
things such as your age, address, 
occupation and why you call bulletin 
boards. Once you've filled all this in 
the sysop will verify the details and 
within about 24 hours you'll become 
a registered member of the board. 
This gives you access to all the files 
areas. 

Guru-10 asks for your date of 
birth. This Is used to tell people 
when your birthday is coming up so 
that they can send you a message. 
This is a good idea that is becoming 
more common throughout the 
comms community. 

The Guru-10 bulletin area 
features a few interesting files 
including a plain English guide to 
public domain and shareware and its 
variations. There is also a complete 
set of download and upload stats for 
you to find out which are the most 
popular files. 

MESSAGES AND FILES 

Of course there are messages, 
seventeen different areas, the 
majority of which are Fidonet echoes. 
And there are files as well. Again 
there are 17 areas but the majority 
of these are PC-based which is a 
shame. The majority of popular 
Amiga files are available though and 
it also provides you with a good 
opportunity to upload files the board 
doesn't already have. 

Guru-10 also has some 
interesting on-line games: Dragon 



Warz and ISA in particular are unique 
in that you play against other callers 
on other boards running the 
software, not just against local 
players. 

Each night the moves which have 
been made are transferred via EMail 
to other boards running the software 
and the game continues. That way, 
you can find yourself playing people 
from hundreds of miles away, in a 
similar manner to a play-by-mail 
game. 

The board also features an on- 
line virus database. At first sight this 
seems a great idea, but 
unfortunately it's only for PC viruses. 
Perhaps an Amiga programmer might 
like to come up with something 
similar for the Amiga. 

CONCLUSIONS 

Guru-10 is a very colourful board. The 
sysop puts a lot of effort into the 
look and feel to make sure you enjoy 
your visits to the board. 

File and message coverage is 
reasonably good, and there is an off- 
line reader available to keep those 
bills down. The internet on-line 
games are a nice twist, hopefully 
they'll become more popular in the 
near future. 



CHIBA CITY 



I've mentioned Chiba City before but 
it's well worth an even closer look. 
Based in Whitburn, Chiba is another 
Amiga-based board, this time running 
some software called Star-Net BBS. 
Star-Net is closely based on the 
Amiga BBS, Paragon. This has been 
very popular in the past and with its 
new owner is likely to become even 



more popular in the future. Chiba City 
is also a technical support board for 
Star-Net so anyone who owns the 
program can download updates from 
the board itself. 

The name Chiba City comes from 
a series of books written by science 
fiction author, William Gibson. The 
Cyberpunk genre named after his 
creation Cyberspace is becoming 
very popular, particularly with the 
advent of virtual reality. The sysop of 
Chiba City has tried to give the board 
a cyberpunk feel by using 
Gibsonesque terminology and 
phrases. The Amiga area is called 
Amiga Warez and the games area is 
called Cyberspace. 

The menus have also been given 
a computer feel, as though they are 
printed on a computer print-out. This 
works well but could be extended 
even more, I get the feeling it is all a 
bit half-hearted. 

The reliability of Star-Net must be 
in question at the moment, the Chiba 
City user database crashed recently 
so all users have had to re-register. 
Whether this will affect the popularity 
of the board is difficult to say, but 
I'm sure some callers won't bother 
to go through the hassle again. 

AMIGA AND PC 

Again, Chiba City is a PC and Amiga 
board although as it runs on an 
Amiga, the emphasis is perhaps 
more on the Amiga. The file areas 
reflect this although there aren't that 
many (seven). They do contain most 
major programs though, and a few 
other less well known programs. The 
areas covered are pretty wide so you 
tend to get a lot of files in each area. 
And of course there is a selection of 
message areas. 

Chiba City really shines at on-line 



games. There are no less than 23 
on-line games for you to play with, 
including ten Infocom adventure 
games - beware though, because 
these can be expensively addictive. 
There are also some more common 
games, including Chess, Master 
Mind, Lotto and a trivia game, as 
well as a couple of space battle 
games which are good fun. 

Chiba City also includes a Fish 
database link although it doesn't let 
you download the files you find, you 
should go to 01 for Amiga for that. It 
is a helpful facility though, enabling 
you to find the programs you want 
before your order them from a PD 
company. 

The program itself is easy to use, 
you just enter the number of the disk 
you want to look at, or a range of 
disks and away you go. You can also 
find the latest version of a particular 
program and you get the full 
descriptions for each program, not a 
cut-down summary. 

You'll find the sysop of Chiba 
City very friendly, more than happy to 
chat and give you some help in 
return for an upload or two. There is 
also the possibility that he will be 
writing his own BBS system in the 
future. We'll be keeping an eye on 
him and keep you posted - it's about 
time the UK had its own BBS 
system. 

CONCLUSION 

Chiba City is a well presented board, 
with a slight Cyberpunk feel which 
will make sci-fi freaks feel right at 
home. 

The file and message areas are 
good but the files areas in particular 
could do with being categorised 
more. All in all, Chiba City is a very 
good board. Q3 



COMING NEXT MONTH • COMING NEXT MONTH 

That's it for now, I hope you enjoy visiting these three boards. If you like 
the board, drop the sysop a note and remember to mention Amiga Shopper. 

Next month I'll be taking a look at comms from a beginner's point of 
view. I'll take you step by step through a BBS log-on and registration so 
you know exactly what to expect. I'll also be giving some coaching on the 
various areas of the boards, including messaging, uploads and downloads. 
Until then, happy comms. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



10 



MEGA GAMES PACKS 



HARWOODS MEGA GAMES PACKS ARE NOW BASED ON THE EXCITING NEW 

AMIGA A600 RANGE OF 1Mb COMPUTERS AND ARE ONLY AVAILABLE FROM 

GORDON HARWOOD COMPUTERS...The Original Pack Specialists' 



- ILL OUR AMIGAS ARE UNITED 

KNGDOM SPECIFICATION AND 

INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING... 

A600FD 

1 Mb. Disk Drive, 1Mb RAM, 

Integral TV Modulator, 
4096 Colours, Multi Tasking, 
Speech Synthesis, 4 Channel 
Digital Stereo Sound, Mouse. 
Workbench Disks & Manuals 
ALL Connecting Cables, 
One Great Game from 
Commodore & Deluxe Paint III 

A600HD 

Spec, as above but with 
a 20 Mb. Hard Drive fitted. 

PLEASE NOTE... 
Neither the Commodore Game 

or Deluxe Paint III are 
included with the A600HD 




Why not have Ihe Amiga 

A600HD machine with a 

20Mb Hard Drive instead 

ol the ABOOFDtor only 

(79 95 EXTRA 






THAT'S RIGHT HARWOODS HAVE PUT TOGETHER THE ULTIMATE AMIGA PACKS YET AGAIN- 
STARTING WITH THE MEGA GAMES PACK 1 WHICH INCLUDES SOME GREAT GAMES! 

Just look at what you get NOW... 

•AMIGA A600FD COMPUTER WITH A FULL 1Mb. OF MEMORY 

•THE LATEST GREAT COMMODORE GAME - With every A600FD you 

can look forward to receiving a fantastic leading title supplied by CBM 

which periodically changes [Supplied with A600FD ONLY not A600HD's] 

•DELUXE PAINT III [Supplied with A600FD ONLY not A600HD's) 

•TAILORED DUST COVER AND MOUSE MAT 

•AND A SUPERB HIGH QUALITY MICROSWITCHED JOYSTICK, 

•PLUS.... 18 MORE GREAT GAMES, THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE... 

BL00DWYCH - Fantasy role-playing game, great interaction with your computer created environment 

BUBBLE+ - Help the dawdling ghost and the soap bubble, escape from the old deserted manor house 

CAPTAIN BLOOD - Astonishing creatures and animated 3D graphics, this is a game you just have to play 

ELIMINATOR - A progressive multi stage flying shoot 'em up, on a long winding course, survive if you can! 

HOSTAGES - You must get your team and hostages out of the terrorist overrun embassy, without loss of lite 

JUMPING JACKSON - In a deluge of colour and sound save, the earth from sadness and melacholy music 

KRYPTON EGG - A classic Breakout game, 60 screens, separated by 6 combat sequences 

LANCASTER - Your mission is to fly the classic WWII bomber on its dangerous raids over enemy territiory 

LOMBARD RAC RALLY - You drive your 300 bhp Sierra Cosworth through demanding stages ot the rally 

PURPLE SATURN DAY - Four arcade games, an exciting" high speed trip into total cosmic 3D space 

SAFARI GUNS - Live the African experience in an animal sanctuary, track the poachers & ivory traffickers 

STIR CRAZY (Featuring Bobo) - Bobo & his inmates are planning a stunning trampoline jump prison escape 

SKYCHASE - Airborne combat for every simulation fan. In this one or two player game, battle against your 

MIG flying adversary in your F-16 Falcon. 

SKYFOX II - Skyfox II, the only ship fast enough to carry on the Skyfox legend. Fight to blow your federation 

enemies trom the Galaxy, at speeds of 9000 kilometres/second! 

STRIKE FORCE HARRIER - Puts you in the cockpit of one of Britains most exiting tighter aircraft. Multiple 

skill levels let you progress to become an ace pilot 

TINTIN ON THE MOON - We've been captured by Colonel Jorgen and he's tring to scupper the moon mission 

Come on Tintin, you're the only one who can save us, and be the first on the moon 

TV SPORTS FOOTBALL - Strap on your helmet for American football simulation that looks like the real thing. 

XENON 2 MEGABLAST - This time it's war! The Xenites are back and have thrown time itself into turmoil. 




A600FD PACK Priced at an INCREDIBLE 



£324 



.95 



We reserve the right to substitute individual software titles or pack items should the need arise. 



A600HD PACK FOR AN EXTRA... 

That's right have Games Pack 1 
with an Amiga A600HD with 20Mb. 
Hard Drive in place of the A600FD 

i 



i hh ca i nH... 



Including VAT 



Nintendo 



IiEGf^ CITIZEN GVI 



HARWOOD'S 
BRILLIANT 1Mb 

AMIGA 600FD 

MEGA GAMES 
PACK 2 

That's right you get 
the fantastic Amiga & 

ALL THE EXTRAS 
detailed in Harwoods 
Mega Games Pack 1 

AND you also get... 

THE PHILIPS 

CM8833 II 

STEREO COLOUR 

MONITOR 



(Lit! 



r A*^ 


A 
3 


MONRORGAMBMCX 


IITIi 




•■■■■(I! 


PACK TOO 



yft .YOU f»N CHOOSE A HflLIPS 
MONITOR TV lof ji»l £20 EXTRA' 
Sw page 3 lor FULL Mian ol thb 
remwlutiie Fitl Tt.i Monitor TV 



fc .. [£524-tl 



Our monitor section on page 3 
gives full details for your choke 
ol Philips Monitors & Monitor TV's 



A600HD PACK 2 FOR AN EXTRA... 

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w» on «jt»ji MMHD -tlh 2 

mnirXnnpUnollh ' 

ft*. CM Qm ID I 



tvr\ at run «*» en i n>*_.. 



iDcwtilhorutitaittiowi 



POWERPRO 



"IT'S THE- 

BUSINESS" 

A TRULY PROFESSIONAL 
PACKAGE SPECIFICALLY 

FOR THE BUSINESS 

MINDED AMIGA USER. 
THIS ONE SHOULD 

FULFILL EVERY AREA 

OF HOME BUSINESS 
YOU'RE LIKELY TO NEED! 

THE BUSINESS PACK 
FROM HARWOODS 
INCLUDES ALL THE 
FOLLOWING... 
AMIGA A600FD 
WITH 1Mb. MEMORY 
+ 
PHILIPS CM 8833/II 
STEREO COLOUR MONITOR 

See Monitor Panel on Page 3 lor Details 

STAR LC200 9 PIN NLfibp 
FULL COLOUR PRINTER 3 ^ 

See Printer Panelon Page 3 tor Details 

* HOST OF BUSINESS SOFTWARE 4 ACCESSORIES... 

PEN PAL V1.3 (Word Processor)...1Mb. 
SUPERBASE II PERSONAL (Database) 

(Sprfaffif N 1Mb 

ft A GREAT CBM GAME 

i DELUXE PAINT III 
Now with ANIMATION 
;, MICROSWrTCHED JOYSTICK 
ft 10 BLANK 3S DISKS 
i DISK LIBRARY CASE 
ft MOUSE MAT 
i 3 TAILORED DUST COVERS 




PROFESSIONAL 
PACK 



OR... YOU CAN CHOOSE 
A PHILIPS MONITOR TV 

lot Just £20 EXTRA! 

See page 3 for FULL 
details ol this remarkable 



Hill 

""in. 

H'lim 

*i;n 




AoOOHD POWERPRO PACK FOR AN EXTRA.. 

Thrfir^ftferttPowpro! 

<riBi*lAMpMKMD< ~ 

(tt«i1["iv.tnpt»ieio.t) 

fM-OIIGm 1 PKI h MOT ut*Cati HO P«»] 



rnu r*v« run wi ca i rut. 




Can© 



O 



ADDACUMANA 

CAX 354 2ND DRIVE 

FOR JUST £50 



HARWOOD'S GREAT 

1Mb AMIGA A600FD 

MEGA GAMES PACK 3 

That's right you get the fantastic 

Amiga & ALL THE EXTRAS 

detailed in Harwoods Mega 

Games Pack 1 (far left) AND... 

then you also get... 

[ THE SUPERB PHILIPS CM8833/II 

STEREOC0LOUR MONITOR 

Our monitor section ^^^ 
on page 3 gives 
lull details tor your 
choice of Philips 
Monilors & Monitor TVs 

•THE SUPER STAR 
LC 200 COLOUR PRINTER... 

185/40 cps. Full Colour 9 Pin NLQ Dot 
'■Jim Printer with a FREE Dust Cover & 
cable to vour Amiga (See primer 
, - panel tort 




■mm 
*lll| 



OR...YOU CAN CHOOSE A PHILIPS 
MONITOR T (or Just £20 EXTRA! 

See page 3 (or FULL details ol Itiis 
remarkable Fasl Text Monitor TV 







£ / f * **||? 



A600HD PACK 3 FOR AN EXTRA... 
ThrfirtgNhntGmiPKll • ■ * « fl - 
.•.'jiir-jji itowd wm Mfc fc ; /fl, ?5. 
t*nlOtv.rpi«. D (lh,AaSOFD% l*T M . 
K*-CQU Gr* 1 P PiM II Mjr kKfaO ■» 41 P**J 



PRIMARY & JUNIOR PACK A 

Get your children off to the right 
computing start with this software 
learn and play Compendium 6 pack... 

UDSTfK WEATHER WATCHER, 

CALOOM QUIZ. WORDS t HUMMUS. 

UK SET t HATCH, 

WHAT SIT?- WHERE IS IT? 

AcUve. mqulrnQ iwint] minds wfl love Hie tun 

otttesesrxeraertwngbijteoaeaoonaliicM 

Your chrWiw protaoly trait even ruflse 

Bin ilteii iKsons- ItM Dugunlt! . 

H0MEMSE 

ic-til haie dotage TfiUn fMjIlMlleillri Mk 

st/jdentrBcordselc. Ear/touse 'push btflon'coBlracs. 

PRIMARY MATHS COURSE 

ArounJ 2* modules it Hits course from 3 yrj otd 

lloW up to secondary lent fctos »C. 

REAMS IWRITrlK COURSE 

24(iwosfccwrseTeachtaflfrcmtr«owiouter 

andboofc fa earty starters A neo>si«K 

A GREAT EDUCTIONAL PACK 

FOR YOUR CHILDREN AT A 

FRACTION OF THE NORMAL COST 

GCSE/O' LEVEL PACK B 

GCSE examination level studies on your 

Amiga computer that's tun! 
MICRO ENGLISH. MICRO FRENCH AND 

MICRO MATHS 
» tel ol B tee unpJSN HMaSM ccl :,-.; H BCSE |M| 
wnWi art also be used lor revtetcn wort All programs 
adhere to me rtidomt Cuitttiuti and were dew; tied 

aod rested in sctiooes tv protesioaal tsachers. 
Mlcro French IncWes "rail speech' to help your accent! 

PEN PAL- Grt*Mcil Wirt rToctttor 

A rartetcwotdptocessorw&Jialrjie tools youl need 

to create eflecfce mIRki wort. Ideal lor home wort, 

orojeds ere « tot thelarrefies Wets. Tea wraps 

. aulctrttaticilry around gtaphka, even is you type' 

Includes a bolt-In database ml Forms Manager. 

H0MEIASE 

Honvtcase a me Ideal irriontiabOn storage program lor 

things W» household Kb, student notes, and chiatens 

edjcatttoral pnaiecls. Inc. dwarty habolsed *[uefi btilton* 

controes and clear comprotrensrve reference manuals 

A GREAT EDUCTIONAL PACK 

FOR YOUR CHILDREN AT A 

FRACTION OF THE NORMAL COST 




mm 

O 

IP** 

Ilium 
ll»" , |l 

imiiji 

iiiiiiii 

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IIIIIIII 

.ullll. 



£6*1 





mm 

iniiiji 



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HillISi 



£8*! 



Apple 



^wm 



Before you choose Irom whom to purchase please phone us. We are alway, 

happy to discuss your requirements, and answer any queries you may have 

,v Pnone oui Order Holline w-th your Access Visa, Maslerca 

J S.V'ic ■ -i -embard Creditcriarge Card Quoting number Sexpiry Gate (Dixois.O 

*^ ' NA.SCP and other SiO'e cards are Lonibaro Cfedilch^ge and a'6 accepted 0v i 

pr— 71 '' Matt cheques banker building society drafts oroostalofd 

[^^1 payaole to GORDON HARWOOD COMPUTERS (Personal business cheques t 

t£ -~ :a ;(jgy« -, =, fron day j' 'eceiptwnereuponyou' order *vili be despatched) Pie 

sf'-d Name Address anc rnost importantly ^ nossible. a Daytrme Teleprione Numl 

along with your order requirements Please check you are ordering tram one of o 

a iavemsements beice posting (phone rt you require contirrnation). Please rer 

emDe' that 'or example many September pnolications apoear during An g 

prices you see nay have changed leilhe' jp or down) 

_-■ =RFf ."I-::', u working days. UK Mainland oniw O 

Add £8 V per -najor i*err tor next working day delivery Lit 

Ma n-irtd most regions 

Most items are available al TAX FREE PRICES to non UK 
I residents and service personnel when visiting export shipment Please contact ii 

: 

'PORT You will be given our Exclusive Technical Support Phone Nurnq 

call should you require any help or advee on any aspect ol the system you have puichasij 

terns proving faulty within 30 days ol purchase are 'solaced w 

NEW UNITS unless otherwise stated. For the whole guarantee penod warranty service w 

completely FREE OF CHARGE 



and a FAST turnaround is GUARANTEED by oji OWN ENGINEERS' 

All computers are tested prior to despatch, and all items 
supplied with mains plug and leads as required ■ iust connect jp and use straight away 

I 

All listed prices are what YOU PA Y, and there are NO HIDDEN EXTRAS. 
VAT and postage are included, and prices are correct at time of going t 
press (Pack details may vary from time to time). Offers are subject to 
availability and to being the latest advertised packs and prices Our offe 
are NOT supplied on a trial basis E&Ol 

< tailored to suit your needs. Written details on request 
Gordon Harwood Computers offer facilities to purchase using our budget account sch< 
APR 36 a\ (Variable) Available fo most adults of eighteen years or over, subject to si 
Simply phone or write and we will send you written details along with an application li 
Applications, required in advance, available (o full lime U.K. mainland residents anc 
overseas British forces personnel Showroom visitors, please ask for details ol our 
store "Instant Account" Written quotations on request ^^ 

If you are already the holder of a Lombard Credit Charge Card you „^ 
can use this to purchase from us (subject to your personal card limit) ^> 

Please pay us a visit where our full range ol advertised products & 
more, is available at the SAME COMPETITIVE PRICES, in the pleas 
surroundings at our purpose built showroom (see "opening times") 
There's plenty ot FREE parking close by too! 




OURHEWSWV.-ROOMI5 
JUST 5 MINUTES FROM ■ 
WEMUUNCTIGH28 







ttf 



C(0PH- 



Enquiries & Order Line 






1 1 n a nix' Facilities Available 



GORDON 

ai rR 



The Closer you look, The Better we k 



RINTERS 



CH£ CK0UR NEw 
^PRICES I 



All printers in our range Include a standard Centronics/Parallel Port 
tor direct connection to Amiga, PC's, Atari STs, Archimedes etc. 
With all our printers you'll get a Free Lead to your comptuer and 
with Dot Matrix Printers you also get a Free Quality Dust Cover. 



The Harwoods Amiga Help Bulletins provided with ALL printers get you going 
straight away by covering specific Workbench Set Up Parameters etc. 

CITIZEN 120Ot 9 PIN MONO -Up to 120/25 cps I ... . nc 

J Very reliable low cost printer with interchangabio interlaces lor 1J4.9S 

Centronics/RS232/serial type (C64 etc.) J 2 Year manufacturers warranty 

STAR LC20 9 PIN MONO • Up to 1 50/38 eps 

lJ Simultaneous, continuous ana single _l 240 x 240 dpi Graphics 
sheet stationery, great paper handling _J Multiple lonl options 

STAR LC200 9 PIN COLOUR PRINTER - 185/40 cps — 

_] 80 Column Dot Matrix _l Push/pull tractor, rear/bottom 
U 240 dpi - 9 Pin COLOUR teeds & Reverse paper teeds □ Paper park with auto 
_] 16K Buffer, 8 Fonts CI Micro paper feed single sheet loading 

Q Front panel programming 3 Colour 8 mono ribbons Q 12 month warranty 



£154.95 



£199.95 



£199.95 



CITIZEN SWIFT 9 PIN COLOUR - 1 

Q 8K Buffer. 4 Fonts LJ Feed for labels/mufti part stationery 

j Push and pull tractor u 240x240 dpi Colour Graphics LI 2 Year Citizen warranty 

STAR SJ48 INKJET PRINTER 

□ 64 Nozzle ink jet Q Optional Ni-Cad battery 
Q Comes with AC adaptor LJ Emulates Epson LQ /IBM □ 360x360 dpi near laser 

□ Large 28K Buffer u Proprinter.full compatibility print quality 



£239.95 



CANON BJ1 Oex NOW AVAILABLE FROM HARWOODS COOQ QC 

A fantastic near laser quality InkJet printer [spec as SJ48 above] i"9.95 



STAR LC24/200 24 PIN MONO • 220/55 cps 

Mono version of LC24I200 Colour, same spec except for a smaller 7K buffer 



STAR LC24/2O0 24 PIN COLOUR - 220/55 eps • 

'_! 80 Column Dot Matrix CI Push/pull Iractor 8 rear/bottom feeds 



£239.95 



£289.95 



_> Micro paper feed 
Q Program from front panel, 
□ No DIP switches 
12 month warranty 



□ 360 dpi • 24 Pin MONO □ Paper park with auto single 

□ 30K Buffer (expandable) sheet loading 
CI 10 Resident Fonts □ Supplied with mono ribbon 
CJ Front Panel Pitch Select ci Reverse paper feed 

NEW 24 Pin CITIZEN 224 COLOUR • 160/53 cps 

CI 80 Column Dot Matrix with 4 Fonts a Push 8 pull tractor feeds 

cl 360 dpi - 24 Pin COLOUR Id Complete paper parking facilities. 

CI 8K Buffer expandable to 32K □ Supplied with mono 8 colour ribbons 

CI Easy to use front panel controls □ Full 2 Year Citizen Warranty 



£229.95 



NEW 24 Pin CITIZEN SWIFT 24E COLOUR - 180/60 cps I O0Q Q c 

□ 80 Column Dot Matrix with 7 Fonts □ Push/pulKbottom Iractor feeds '-^"•gJ 



CI Complete paper parking facilities. 
d Supplied with mono 8 colour ribbons 
d Full 2 Year Citizen Warranty 



d 360 dpi -24 Pin COLOUR 
d 8K Buffer expandable to 32K 
d Easy to use LCD panel controls 

STAR XB 24 PIN COLOUR RANGE... 
XB24-200 and XB24-250 - 275/80 cps 

d Exceptional print quality 

d 4 x 48Pin super letter quality fonts 

d 14 x24Pin near letter quality fonts d 360 x 360 dpi Colour Graphics 

d Buffer 29K(XB24/200) 8 76K(XB 24/250) d 12mlhs on-site wananty (UK Mainland) 



X824-200 Colour 

£399.95 



XB24-250 Colour 

£499.95 



£579.95 



HEWLETT PACKARD PAINTJET COLOUR A4 INKJET 

d For presentation graphics/DTP, CAD and technical/scientific applications 

d Parallel/Centronics or Serial RS232 l/F (specify with order, MAC option available) 

d A lull page of colour graphics in 4 minutes (typical) d Will print transparencies 

d Nonimpact printing, virtually silent, 43dba d 1Yr on-site war ranty (UK Mainland) 



£999.95 



STARSCRIPT - 4ppm POSTSCRIPT COMPATIBLE LASER 

A4 User Printer, will connect to PC, Amiga, Alari ST, Macintosh etc. 

d 300 DPI, 2Mb. Upgradable to 5Mb. d Complete with 'Staiscripf d Serial S Parallel l/F 
d Emulations inc: HP Series II, Epson d (Slars version of postscript) d Applelalk l/F for Macs 
EX600, IBM Proprinler 8 Diablo 630 d 49 quality fonts d 1Yr on site warranty (UK Mainland 

PRINTER RIBBONS 




CITIZEN SWIFT 9 BUCK/COLOUR 



SWIFT 2i'2.|E;224 BLACK/COLOUR 



MONITORS AND 
MONITOR TV's 

Harwoods stock a complete range of both Monitors & Monitor TV's 
to give you your perfect solution to the type of display to buy. 



£204.99 



PHILIPS CM8833/II 1 <" Stereo Hi 9" Resolution Colour Monitor 



The ever popular 14-inch Philips CM 8833 Mkll. Its versatility means you not only get excellent colour graphics & text performance with a 
wide range of personal computers, but when connected lo a VCR , you get an amazing 600 pixel TV picture.Wrth the 8833 Mkll, Harwoods 

give you 9ie complete set up. to get you gomg straighl away... Monitor, RGB picture and Stereo Audio Cables, Tailored dust cover, 

and 1 2 Months on site service warranty, ft RGB/AD, TTL, Composite. Video & stereo audio Inputs > Can be used as a TV with VCR or Tuner 

'j Also as a Video Camera display monitor -'< Retractable stand ft Twin Stereo Speakers -V Headphone Jack Socket 

> FREBeao tor your computer U FREE 12 Month on site servtco warranty. 



COMMODORE 1084S 14 " Slere0 H ' gh Resolu|ion Co ' ou ' Moni,< " 



£249.95 



Commodore's Own Stereo High Resolution Colour Monitor with... A RGB/Al/TTL, Composite. Video/Audio Inputs 

i Can be used as TV with VCR or tuner, .'r Twin Speakers for stereo output 5 Supplied with cables for 

A5007600, CGA PC,\C1 6-64-1 28. 



£239.95 



PHILIPS 15" FASTEXT TELETEXT TV MONITOR 



SUPERB DEFINITION PHILIPS MONITOR TV. IDEAL FOR AMIGA OR CDTV USERS. GIVING FOR THE FIRST TIME 

TRUE MONITOR OUALITY FROM A FULL FEATURE TELETEXT TV AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICEI LOOK AT THE FEATURES... 

Direct Scart Connector for Amiga, CDTV, VCR OR SATELLITE RECEIVER A RGB/AD, Composite Video 8 audio inputs 

FULL TELETEXT FACILITIES (FOR THIS FACILITY EXTERNAL AERIAL SHOULD BE USED) .VHeadphone Jack Socket 

i FULL TWO YEAR GUARANTEE A2000 CHARACTER HIGH DEFINITION FST TUBE U SUPPLIED WITH LOOP AERIAL 

i REMOTE CONTROL 1 FREE lead for YOUR computer (IF YOU WOULD UKE THE MONITOR TV N OUR PACKS 2, 3, AND 

POWERPRO.AT JUSTBOEXTRA, TO REPLACE THE 8833/11, SIMPLY ADVISE US AT THE VME OF ORDERING) 
It's important lo remember that rnosl TV Monitors, are stiff first and loremost televisions, meaning mat their average 400 pixel lube display 
50% lower resolution than a monitor) cannot be guaranteed to display B0 column text clearly without risking eye strain. II choosing a Television 
Monitor ensure II has the latest 2000 character tube capability, meaning it can handle the Amigas' 80 characters, by 25 line output dearly. 



10 GREAT GAMES WITH YOUR TV OR MONITOR FOR ONLY £10 (ie. These games are available 
with Harwoods Amiga Packs 1. 2. 3, & Powerpro...see details on pages 1 & 2 ol this ad!!! 



AMIGA DISK DRIVES 



Cumana CAX354 3.5" 
External 2nd Drive. 



GVP 52-420Mb HARD 

DISK DRIVES WITH 

MEMORY EXPANSIONS 

OF UP TO 8Mb. 



> Features Include i Long connecting cable U Access 
Light . 1Mb, (880K Formatted) Capacity I. Throughport 
-V Enable/Disable Switch .(Compatible with Amlga500/ 
600/10001500/2000/3000 and CDTV 



£54.95 



NOW SUPPLIED WITH A FREE 
3.6" MkHMd Cleaner 

.v Capacities of 52 to420Mb -V Connects to sidecar bus [UH side A500/A500 Plus] 
-V Autoboote with Kickstart 1 .3/2.0, boot enable/disable switch .'r Up to 8 Mb of RAM 
.V SCSI Port allows up to 7 other devices to be connected J Supplied with easy to use 
software i 2 Year Warranty .V Dedicated PSU i Mini slot for future expansion 
> PC-AT Emulator planned to be available for 1992 



GVP AMIGA A500 HARD DRIVES 1 I l GVP AMIGA 1500/2000 HARD DRIVES I 



RAM CAPACITY I RAM CAPACITY 

SIZE 52Mb. I 120Mb.] 240Mb. I SIZE 52Mb. I 120Mb. I 240Mb. I 420Mb. 



0Mb. 


£349.95 


:. .: 


£729.95 


0Mb. 


£289.95 


£409.95 


£639.95 


£1169.95 


2Mb. 


£419.95 


£529.95 


£799.95 


2Mb. 


E3595J 


£479.95 


£709.95 


£1239.95 


4Mb. 


£489.95 


£599.95 


£869.95 


4Mb. 


£429.95 


£549.95 


£779.95 


£1309.95 


8Mb. 


:?y, 55 


5739.95 


£999.95 


8Mb. 


£55$ -:: 


£679.95 


£899.95 


:■ -55 55 


CALL FOR MEMORY UPGRADE PRICES IF YOU ALREADY ARE A GVP OWNERI 



STARLC2Q0 BLACK/COLOUR £6.95 ZX9 £36.95 ZX9 El 2.95 zmcl £69.95 om. 



STSRLC2W0O BLACKlCOLQUR £8.95 Z24 £49.95 Z24 £14.95x2JCL £74.95>2<cl 



STAR XB RANGE BLAOUCOLOUR ffl.95 Z24 £49.95 Z24 £14.95kicl£74.95x24Cl 



STAH SJ4B INK l D . , r¥ nN . y Also compatible wllh Apple Slylinvrilor (.« c qc m 

CARTRIDGE bu "' R unL * and Cannon B-HOax Bubbleict ■- ' 33aea - 



PRINTER ACCESSORIES 



Ciiarn '310* Shoot Feeder r« ■ 

■. ;. ■ :.. - !; VI,'..- 

... '.-.'.■.-.-...■■.. 
Cilaen 1240 32K Buffer CU96 

Citaren 1240 Semi-Auto SheelFeedef £35,95 
Citizen 1 24D Autmraltc Shee! Feeder mas 
Ctliwn 124D Printer Stand C2.:.fc 

■ 

Cabin SwdWAuiMt i ■■■-"•■! '■■• '■: 
'OSMnSMd SPihWrSanrj 
CIWenSWH9XPtnloi Stand 
Owen Swift 9X AuiomaSc Sheet Feeder £1»9S 
Cttfcen SurUt 24 32K Printer Bultet 
Ctti?Bi Swift 24 Serai-Auto 5hW : ■ 

■■. :' ■:■ 

Otoen SWR24 Printei Stand 
C*mo Swift 24X Auto Sheet Feeder JIMfc 
C«mS*ill24XPrtrterSttnd £H» 



Star LC-20 Auto ShoolFoedor 0»<tB 

Star LC24-1032K Buffer i£-.fc, 

Stat LC24-10 Auto SheetFoedM 17*95 

BteL&araAftn&Sheeifeedu 
StaiLC 24-200 3« Printer Buffer UMft 
Sta: LC 24-200 Auto SlwetFeeder Vi 96 
Stiv SJ46 Aulcnutc Sheer Feeder 'tiJ.^ 
SlftrSj45«-OudBaiefy CSM6 

SIM XB 24-200 Pull Ttaclor 
StafXB 24-200 FomCad-StytesTBA 00.95 
StB.-XB24-2Wt29KPftrt9rBufler W.K 
Sta-XB 34-200 AuWShertFeeder ttt4.» 
Slat XB 34-200 Dual Bn 5ht, Feeder CM9 9f 
aaiXBW-a50Pt*T(»Cta 
Sta <D*24^fi0fOfrtCirVSM«7BA 
StarXB24-2501?BKPTinHrBufftf • 
S^fX824-2MAuKSne«tFeed* | 
■■ -. .: ....■ ■-, ...- 



Hewlett PWcard Painyet 

Or^MPriDla 

AcrasGCties- 

Bteftlm: cartridge . 

Colour Ir* Cartr^go .; . 

Sao> Sheet Printe. Paper 

Z-Foid Punier 



Transparancv Paper 

°d<-x Of ~.i S'1^1- 



A/V\IOM AftCAAUKT tArMINDIV/IN 
HARWOODS AMIGA 1Mb PRO-RAM PLUS 

ADD MORE POWER TO YOUR AMIGA 500 PLUS WITH A FULL 1Mb. UPGRADE!!! 

> 1Mb. RAM expansion for the Amiga 500 Plus 

Gives a total of 2Mb. of RAM ^EL3^ A GREAT NEW 0FFER 

> Easily fitted without any dismantling in VSQl» FROM HARWOODS 
the trapdoor expansion slot underneath ^ifigj^ •, a a. * m 
Amiga. DOESN'T invalidate your warranty! gjf... fcjiy^yJ! 

> Low power consumption ' 



2 Yr Guarantee! 



0.5 Mb PRO-RAM 

,> Compatible with Amiga A500 and 500 Plus 

Gives A500 a total of 1 Mb Memory + Clock ,;,['., „ 

I Gives 500 Plus a total of 1 .5Mb Memory ' 

LOOK OUT FOR THE A600FD/HD UPGRADE AVAILABLE SOON!!! 



mm 



(|UMANA H^a 



Nintendo 



mm^ citizen < 



• I 



>TV 






JAN, THE CONCEPT OF A NEW, MORE POWERFUL AMIGA... 

r MEMORY, AND A COMPACT DISK DRIVE OF ALMOST INFINITE SIZE. A DISK DRIVE SO VAST, IT CAN 
OF MILLIONS OF DIGITS OF DATA. THIS DATA COULD BE, SPEECH, ANIMATED PICTURES, DIGITISED 
STEREO SOUND, COMPUTER IMAGES OR WHOLE ENCYCLOPAEDIAS.... AND MORE. 

IE THIS AND YOU CAN START TO GRASP THE CONCEPT OF CDTV 

FREE CDTV STARTER PACK ONLY FROM HARWOODS!!! 

I CHOOSE YOUR CDTV FROM GORDON HARWOOD. NOT ONLY DO YOU GET OUR LEGENDARY SERVICE, BUT 
f/E YOU A CDTV STARTER PACK, TO GET YOU EXPLORING YOUR NEW WORLD - STRAIGHTAWAY. 
5 INCLUDES A SUPERB SELECTION OF CD DISK TITLES INCLUDING THE WELCOME TUTORIAL & HUTCHINSONS ENCYCLOPAEDIA, 
LUS ... FIVE GAMES, SHERLOCK HOLMES & THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES, SIM CITY, CHAOS IN 
ANDROMEDA, A TOWN WrTH NO NAME, AND THE ACCLAIMED LEMMINGS, WORTH IN TOTAL ALMOST 
£200.00. IN ADDITION IS A FREE INFRARED REMOTE CONTROLLER. EVERYTHING TO GET YOU STARTED! 



£499.95 



CDTV ACCESSORIES 



Please call lor 
latest availability. 



CD 1220 KEYBOARD 
C0 1252 MOUSE 
CD 1200 TRACKBALL 



CD 1400 CADDY 

CD 1401 MEMORY CARD 



CD 1405 MEMORY CARD 



AN 89 KEY QWERTY KEYBOARD £49 95 

INFRARED MOUSE WITH BATTERY SAVER. £49.95 
INFRARED TRACKBALL, WITH THE OPTION £79.95 
OF DIRECT CONNECTION TO EXTEND BATTERY LIFE. 
DUPLICATES FUNCTIONS OF 2 BUTTON MOUSE & 
INCLUDES TWO 9 PIN PORTS FOR STD. JOYSTICKS 
FOR HOLDING CD WITHIN DRIVE £995 

PERSONAL RAM CARD CONTAINING £7995 

64K OF MEMORY FOR STORING DATA OR AS A 
BOOKMARK FACILITY WITHIN CDTV 
A LARGER PERSONAL RAM CARD, 512K OF £249 95 
MEMORY FOR STORING DATA ON CDTV 



CBM FLOPPY DRIVE 3.5' FLOPPY DRIVE WITH 
CAPACITY. MATCHING BUCK FINISH . SUPPLIED 
WITH WORKBENCH DISKS/MANUALS etc. £99.95 
CD 1301 GENLOCK PAL BASED VIDEO INTER- 
FACE CARD FOR SUPERIMPOSING CDTV IMAGES 
OVER A VIDEO SIGNAL PROVIDED BY ANY STD 
VIDEO SOURCE £14995 

ROCUTE3.5" DRIVE CDTV COMPATIBLE AND 
AND STYLED IN MATCHING BLACK. £69.95 

Plus lots of Great CDTV Software in stock!!! 



AMIGA SOFTWARE & ACCESSORIES 



HARWOODS AMIGA 

PRO-OEN 

Complete wfthTREEMum- 
Cable Connecting Kit! 



PROFESSIONAL QUALITY 
GENLOCK FOR COMPUTER 

AND VIDEO MIXING, AT A 
DOWN TO EARTH PRICE!!! 



PROVEN WW, /\»|i w fs af . nc 

Ptalon Paint 2.0ONLY £89.95 



MODE SWITCH-BOX FOR PRO-GEN 
AND RENDALE 8802 GENLOCKS 

Supplied With Genlock Extender Cable Worth £9.95 

Switch-box Switches Between Foreground, | , j 

Background, Video And Computer Modes. £29 95 

Uusic-X: The ultimate software lor professional MIDI sequencing. The software includes a configurable librarian and a NEW LOW prices' 
synthesiser patch editor. All you need to recreate a song can be recalled from one performance file including £49.95 or just £69.95 

sequences, MIDI routing, sync setup, keyboard maps 8 synthesiser or drum machine patch libraries. wift mkfWntertace! 

MIDI INTERFACE (5 Port): In, Out, Through plus 2 swilchaWe thru'/out. Inc. 2 cables. £24.95 

AMOS: AMOS allows you to access the power of the Amiga with ease. 500 different commands make AMOS a sophisticated £49.95 

development language. The AMOS animation language allows you to create complex animation sequences. 300 page manual 
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AMOS 






Jason Holborn takes 
a look at a new 
extension for AMOS, 
reviews a handy 
manual for would-be 
games programmers 
and unveils the 
secrets behind 
writing maze games 



It's been a busy month In the 
world of AMOS. After the 
drought of news and products 
that I had to face last month, 
the flood gates have suddenly 
opened and my desk has become 
awash with new bits and pieces to 
make the life of an AMOS coder 
that bit simpler. As well as the 
usual selection of new PD utilities 
and demos, I've received yet 
another extension for AMOS that 
extends the language still further. 



I've been thinking hard over the 
past couple of weeks about the sort 
of features that Europress ought to 
be including in the next release of 
AMOS, AMOS Professional. Try as I 
might, I could only come up with a 
single suggestion - ARexx support. 
Whether this is a reflection of my 
lack of imagination or a testament to 
AMOS' power is up to you to judge. 
Despite this, I feel that ARexx 
support should be at the top of 
Europress' features hit list. 

Although I'm a great fan of 
AMOS, I have to admit that I've been 
having a lot of fun with ARexx just 
recently (check out my new ARexx 
column on page 88 of this issue). If 
AMOS were to include ARexx 
support, it could be used to code 
anything from complete front ends 
for multimedia systems, to point of 
sales and shells for other 
applications. Europress really should 
think seriously about this - If ARexx 
support were to be included, I can 
see AMOS being taken on by a lot of 
professional programmers simply 
because it would be the only 
language that could talk to and 
control other applications. 

NCOMMAND UPDATE 

Oasis Software has announced the 
release of NCommand version 2.04, 
the latest release of its Workbench 
2.0-like user interface extension for 
AMOS. NCommand enables you to 
produce AMOS applications with the 
same look and feel as Workbench 
2.04, the latest release of the 
Amiga's operating system, complete 
with radio buttons, scroll gadgets 
and other elements of the Amiga's 
GUI system. 



As well as a couple of cosmetic 
changes, this latest release includes 
a number of enhancements to the 
existing NCommand gadget and 
requester types including the 
NCommand file requester, radio 
gadgets and the default colour 
palette which now conforms exactly 
to Commodore's defaults. For 
NCommand to reach version 2.04, 
11 new commands have been added 
including FASTDIR (which speeds up 
file requester operations), 
FIRSTDIR_UPDATE (informs the 
system that the directory list has 
been updated without having to read 



"NCommand 

enables you to 

produce AMOS 

applications with 

the same look and 

feel as Workbench 



2.04. 



a 



it again from scratch), PROGRESS 
(adds a trace mode to NCommand), 
SLDH (moves slide bar gadgets 
under software control), 
TXT_DISPLAY (used to display a text 
file from within a program) and 
GBBOX (creates a button box). 

Two of the NCommand utilities 
have also been updated. The screen 
designer has been updated to allow 
use of NCommands new facilities 
and the Graphic Converter utility will 



AMOS ANSWERS 



If AMOS has you baffled / let Jason 
Holborn put your mind at rest 



POWER PACKED LIBRARY 

I am In the process of writing a 
word processor using AMOS and 
would like to be able to edit text 
files that have been crunched using 
Nlco Francois' excellent 
PowerPacker utility. I understand 
from the documentation that this 
can be achieved by opening and 
using the routines contained within 
Nlco's Powerpacker.library file 
included on the program disk. How 
can I do this? 

I also need to be able to access 
the dos. library so that I can obtain 



disk statistics such as the amount 
of free space available etc. Any help 
you can give will be greatly 
received. 

Jon Simons 
Pinner, Middlesex 

Short of using the operating system 
to open the library and then using 
library offsets, as far as I am aware 
there is no way to access the 
powerpacker library from within 
AMOS. As for accessing the 
dos. library for disk statistics - why? 
AMOS already includes a 



comprehensive selection of disk 
management commands and 
functions including DFREE (returns 
the amount of free space on a given 
disk), KILL (deletes a file), RENAME 
(renames a file) and EXISTS (checks 
whether a file exists on a given disk). 
Use these instead - they're far less 
hassle to use than their dos. library 
equivalents. 

If you insist on using the 
dos. library routines though, the 
function you need is called 
=D0SCALL and is documented on 
page 287 of the AMOS manual. This 
function requires a pretty good 
understanding of the Amiga's ROM 
kernel and the format for passing 
parameters via the 68000's data 
and address registers, so you may 
want to stick with AMOS' own 
routines (1 know I wouldl). 

VENTURING FORTH 

I would like to write an adventure 
game on the Amiga and I was 
wondering whether Europress' Easy 
AMOS was up to the task. Having 



used the Quill and Incentive's 
Graphic Adventure Creator on the 
Commodore C64, 1 haven't yet seen 
a program which comes close to 
either on the mighty Amiga. 

The adventure game I have 
planned will have various puzzles, 
plenty of locations and intelligent 
computer-controlled characters who 
- as well as being able to Interact 
with the player - can lead 'lives' of 
their own. Please help. 

Stuart Hardy 
Sheffield 

There's no doubting that Easy AMOS 
is up to the task, but - as is the 
situation with all programming 
languages - are your programming 
skills as equally well qualified? Both 
the Quill and GAC take a lot of the 
work away from the programmer so 
unless you've had experience coding 
adventure parsers in the past, I 
doubt whether you'll be able to jump 
straight in and start coding. 

You could try Aegis' Visionary 
(read my review in Amiga Shopper 



KirWFMRFP lOQ? 



AMOS 



now automatically convert 32-colour 
Amiga IFF images to ST 16-colour 
format. There's also a new Address 
Label printing utility which not only 
shows off NCommand in action, but 
is also jolly useful. 

Existing users of NCommand can 
upgrade to the new release by 
sending £1 plus their original disk. 
For the rest of you though, the full 
NCommand package costs £7.50 
and is available from Oasis at 392 
Birch Rd, Wardle, Rochdale, Lanes 
OL12 9LX. Alternatively you can call 
Oasis direct (after 6pm please!) on 
0706 376572. 



"D-Sam adds no 

fewer than 46 new 

commands and 

functions to 



AMOS. 



// 



PLAY IT AGAIN SAM! 

If you're starting to feel held back by 
AMOS' sound commands, then no 
doubt you'll be interested in a new 
extension from AZ Software. 

Called D-Sam, AZ's extension 
adds no fewer than 46 new 
commands and functions to AMOS 
which will enable you to write 
programs that can play sampled 
sounds directly from hard disk, 
floppy disk or memory. 

Even if you have an Amiga with 
no more than 512K of memory, 
D-Sam will enable you to play 



samples of over 800K in size simply 
by pulling them in directly from floppy 
disk. 

On a machine equipped with a 
hard disk, the size of your samples is 
limited only by the size of your drivel 
D-Sam also provides compatibility 
with Aegis AudioMaster Ill's 
sequenced sample facility, enabling 
you to play parts of a sample in a 
sequence, giving the impression of a 
much longer sample than is actually 
being played. Other D-Sam features 
include support for sample fading, 
oversampling, playing of raw and IFF 
samples and direct support for 
compressed samples. 

D-Sam costs £19.95 and is 
available from AZ Software at AZ 
House, Broadfield Road, Eastington, 
Stonehouse, Gloucestershire. 

BOOK FOR BOFFINS 

If you're after a good book to read 
through the midnight hours, then 
look no further than Stephen Hill's 
Amiga Game Maker's Manual, a new 
release from Sigma press, written 
specifically for AMOS users. 

The 400-page book has been 
designed as both an introduction to 
the AMOS language and games 
programming in general. If you've 
ever wanted to unleash your gaming 
ideas, then this may well be the book 
you've been waiting for. 

The book takes you slowly 
through the basics behind the 
important aspects of games 
programming such as opening and 
scrolling screens, using maps, blitter 
objects and sampled sounds through 
AMOS Basic. 

Once all this theory is safely 
implanted, Stephen Hill shows you 



how you can put it all into practice 
within your own games. 

For the arcade game 
programmers among you, the book 
shows you how to move sprites 
around the screen at high speed, 
how to implement fire control, 
collision detection and background 
animation. Other types of game 
covered include simulations, flight 



book which every would-be AMOS 
games programmer shouldn't be 
without. 

The Amiga Games Maker's 
Manual can be purchased at all good 
book stores (ISBN No 1-85058-230- 
0). Alternatively if you can't manage 
to get hold of it in your local book 
store, you can purchase it directly 
through Sigma on 0625 536800. 




Play AudioMaster III sequenced samples within your AMOS programs with AZ 
Software's new D-Sam AMOS extension 



simulators, adventure games and 
even RPGs. 

It's obvious by reading through 
the first couple of chapters that 
Stephen certainly knows his stuff. 
Even some of the more complex 
aspects of AMOS programming are 
covered with the kind of crystal clear 
explanations that such subjects 
demand. To make things even 
clearer, the book includes a mass of 
demonstration listings that can be 
typed in and toyed around with. 

As you can probably guess, I was 
impressed by the Amiga Game 
Maker's Manual. It's a very readable 



WHERE IS IT? 

Those of you trying to locate the 
AMOS for Beginners section in this 
month's AMOS Action will have 
realised that it isn't there. 

We had to drop this regular part 
of the AMOS column for this month 
simply because of the amount of 
space required to explain the maze 
game routines covered in this 
month's games programming 
section. 

Rest assured though that AMOS 
for Beginners will be back with a 
vengeance next month! 

more on page 1 1 5 



issue 17). Although Visionary does 
make programming adventures 
easier, it too relies on previous 
experience from the programmer. 
Alternatively, why not check out a 
new AMOS PD disk called ABC 
{Adventure Bank Creator) which 
contains a program which claims to 
be a complete adventure writing 
system. It's available from the official 
AMOS PD library n 0792 588156. 
I'll be featuring it in next month's 
issue. 

JOYSTICK PROBLEMS 

Whenever I play a game using the 
joystick, the player's sprite always 
seems to end up at the top of the 
screen. Now that I've started to 
write my own games In AMOS, I And 
that exactly the same is happening. 
Have I got a virus? I've checked 
through all my disks using a number 
of different virus killers, but none of 
them have managed to find anything 
suspicious. 

Nick Banbury 
Mansfield, Notts 



I've got some good news for you and 
some bad news. First the good 
though - there's nothing wrong with 
your Amiga or AMOS. The bad news 
though is that it sounds to me that 
your joystick has kicked the bucket. 
Either take it along to your local store 
for repair (joystick problems are 
usually minor) or treat yourself to a 
new one. 

MUSIC MAESTRO, PLEASE! 

I am writing a music composition 
program In AMOS and I would like to 
be able to save scores In AMOS 
Music Bank Format. Could you 
please tell me where I could obtain 
the details of this format? 

Simon Lewis 
Exeter, Devon 

You'll be pleased to learn that you 
don't have to construct the file 
format yourself - all you have to do is 
to save out the music bank using the 
AMOS command SAVE "Filename",3 
(bank 3 always contains AMOS 
sound track data). Hope this helps! 



ICON DO IT 

I want to write a scrolling shoot 'em 
up game that employs a 
continuously changing background. 
I've tried the source code you 
printed In a recent Issue of Amiga 
Shopper for hardware scrolling, but 
using the scrolling technique tends 
to eat up a lot of memory. Is there a 
more memory-efficient way of 
achieving the same results? 

Ben Taylor 
Aberdeen 

What you need to do is to use the 
AMOS Map Editor and Icon 



commands to construct your 
game's background graphics. The 
Map Editor works by splitting the 
background into a series of tiny 
graphic blocks which can be used 
over and over again within the 
same scroll without eating up 
large chunks of RAM. This is 
actually exactly the same technique 
that professional programmers 
use, so it's a tried and tested 
programming technique. I'll be 
covering both the Map Editor 
and Icon commands in the very 
near future, so stay tuned for 
more. 



HELP! I NEED A HOLBORN 

Every month our resident AMOS genius (wot me? - Jason) answers your 
AMOS-related problematic prose within these very pages. If there's an 
aspect of AMOS that is troubling you, then send you letters to Jason 
Holborn. Amiga Shopper, Future Publishing Ltd, 30 Monmouth Street. 
Bath. Avon. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1M5 11 




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AMOS 



I had originally planned on 
writing a tutorial on grabbing 
and using sampled sound 
effects within a game, but the 
arrival of Steve Bennett's Maze 
Crazy source code got me thinking 
(Don't worry, we'll cover samples In 
a future issue). I'm sure that many 
of you will find Steve's code useful 
for developing your own games. 
Take a look at page 116 for the full 
listing of Maze Crazy. 

There is however still a lot of 
extra code which needs to be added 
to turn this very useful routine into a 
workable game. Think on the 
following for example... how do you 
move the player's character around 
the maze without it walking through 
walls? How about adding a few 
baddies that can chase the player's 
character around the maze. How are 
they to be controlled so that they will 
act in an intelligent manner? All 
these questions (and more!) can now 
be answered. 




The movement control routine for 
the baddies which inhabit the maze 
constantly scans all exits for the 
player's sprite 

YOUR MOVE, PUNK! 

Upon first inspection, the most 
obvious way to control the player's 
movement around the maze is to use 
collision detection, but believe it or 
not there is a considerably easier 
method that is virtually fool proof. As 
you can see from the Maze Crazy 



"The obvious way 

to control the 

player's movement 

around the maze is 

to use collision 

detection. 



// 



source code, the mazes are stored 
internally as a series of data 
statements containing nothing more 
than Os (for an empty space) and Is 
(for a graphic block). All the routine 



does that draws the maze is to 
interpret this data resulting in the 
beautiful mazes that you'll see on 
your Amiga's screen. 

Now Steve's code may not be 
perfect, but it does have one major 
advantage over similar routines that 
randomly generate mazes - because 
the maze can be defined by the 
programmer, we can also use this 
data as an alternative to using 
collision detection. 

As the maze is essentially an 18 
by 14 grid containing either Os or Is, 
all we need to do is to treat the 
player's movement in the game as a 
series of steps through this grid 
expressed as a set of co-ordinates. 
For example, if the player was to be 
placed at position (2,2), he could 
therefore move (in a single step) up, 
down, left or right to positions (2,1), 
(2,3), (1,2) and (3,2) respectively - 
we'll ignore diagonal movement for 
the meantime. 

Obviously the code to handle this 
is very simple indeed. 
All you need to do is 
check the status of 
the joystick each time 
the player's character 
once during the main 
game loop - if JUP() 
returns a value of -1 
then decrement the Y 
co-ordinate, increment 
it if J DOWN is true 
and so on. 

Now this is all 
well and dandy 
providing that there 
are no walls in the 
way - if there are, the player's sprite 
will simply walk straight through 
them as if it were a ghost. How do 
we stop this from happening? I'll 
explain. 

When the joystick is tested, the 
first thing that the movement routine 
should do is check to see whether 
the grid position that the character 
would move to is actually an empty 
space. It does this by checking 
through a dimensional array 
containing the same maze data that 
the Maze Crazy routine uses to draw 
the maze. 

Let's say for example that the 
player's sprite is at position (2,2) 
and the player has attempted to 
move the sprite to position (2,1). If 
there was a wall there, the player's 
sprite should therefore not move. To 
achieve this, the movement routine 
would calculate the theoretical new 
position and then check the maze 
data to see if the value held within 
(2,1) is a 0. If it is, the movement is 
allowed. If is isn't though, the 
player's joystick input should simply 
be ignored resulting in the sprite 
staying in its original position. 

You're probably thinking that this 
technique would result in some 
rather jerky movement - after all, the 



To check whether the boddie hos 
spotted the player's sprite, all 
blonk squares immediately up, 
down, left and tight of the 
boddie's position ote checked. II 
the player i> not spotted in any 
one ol these lout directions, 
More a wall is encountered, the 
boddie continues in search mode 



ACTION 




Ultima IV It may not be, but this game took no longer than 2 hours to write! 
Read this month's games programming feature and you too could produce 
your own maze game 



GAMES PROGRAMMING 

MAZE GAMES 



Crazy things these mazes - the 
source of confusion and the source 
of fun... Jason Holborn guides you 
through the code jungle 



player's character is moving 16 
pixels in a single turn. Not so with 
some clever programming. All you 
need to do is to delay joystick input 
for a couple of moves and use this 
delay to smoothly scroll the sprite. 
Simple, eh? 




To stop the player's sprite 
walking through walls, the maze 
data used to construct the maze 
is consulted. II a is 
encountered in the direction the 
player wants to move, the move 
is considered legal. H a I is 
encountered, the move is illegal 
ond therefore the sprite should 
not move 



All movements within the maze are 
controlled by checking whether a 
wall blocks the sprite's movement. 
Without this, both the player and the 
baddies would walk straight through 
the walls 

BRING IN THE BADDIES! 

Now we have our hero happily 
running around the maze, we now 
need some baddies to chase after 



him. Movement of the baddies isn't 
a problem - all you do is to adapt the 
routine you used for the player's 
sprite so that the baddies use 
exactly the same rules of movement 
but under computer control. What we 
do need though is a routine that 
adds a little bit of 
intelligence to our 
baddies so that they 
will actually pursue 
our hero around the 
maze in true PacMan 
style. 

Although such a 
routine may initially 
appear rather 
complicated, the best 
way to design a 
routine like this is to 
draw up a set of 
rules of behaviour 
that the baddies will follow. 

BACK TO REALITY 

Despite the fact that some games 
will have baddies pursuing the hero 
no matter where they are within the 
maze in relation to the player's 
sprite, this isn't very realistic. If you 
think about it, if the maze was real 
and you were being hunted down by 
a pack of wolves wandering around 



ACTION 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



11 



AMOS 



the maze, they'd be as lost as you 
are. It is therefore only necessary to 
have the baddies pursuing the hero 
when they can actually see him. If 
they can't see him, they'll just 
continue searching around the maze 
until they do find him. This obviously 
gives the player an advantage 
because you know where they are, 



"The best way to 
design a routine is 
to draw up a set of 
rules of behaviour 
for the baddies to 
follow..." 



but they're totally blind until he 
comes into full view. 

What we therefore need to code 
this routine is a method of 
transferring all this theory into 
practice. The baddie movement 
routine must therefore work in two 
modes - in a search mode (the 
baddie hasn't spotted the player) 
and a pursue mode (he's after him). 

SEARCH AND FIND 

The search mode is pretty 
straightforward - all you do is start 
the baddie in a particular position 
and then generate a random number 
between 1 and 4 that is used to 
decide in which direction the baddie 
is to move - up if the answer is 1, 
down if It is 2, left if it is 3 and right 
if it is 4. We then use our movement 
routine to check that the monster 
can actually move in this direction. If 
it can't, a random number is 
generated until a legal direction is 
decided upon. 

MONSTROUS DECISIONS 

Once the monster has decided which 
direction it wants to move in, we 
want to keep him moving in that 
direction until he either comes into 
contact with a wall or the player's 
sprite. You should therefore have a 
variable that contains the number 
which was generated to decide upon 
the baddie's direction of movement. 
Each time the baddie is moved 
another square, the movement 
routine checks the contents of this 



variable and increments of 
decrements the appropriate co- 
ordinate. 

Now that search mode is out of 
the way, we need to add pursue 
mode which will give the baddie the 
ability to change its direction 
suddenly if the player's sprite comes 
into its line of sight. This too is 
actually a very simple routine. All you 
need to do is continuously check all 
the clear blocks directly up, down, 
left and right of the baddie. 

If the routine encounters a wall 
in any one of the four directions 
before it encounters the player's 
sprite, this direction is ignored. If the 
player's sprite is encountered 
though, the baddie's direction of 
movement is altered so that it starts 
to move in the direction of the 
player's sprite - this pursue mode 
then continues until the baddie 
either tracks down the player or the 
player manages to move out of the 
baddie's line of sight (if this 
happens, the baddie has effectively 
lost the player and will therefore 
start to search again). 

INSTANT GAMES 

Phew! We've covered some pretty 
heavy routines this month, but you 
should now be in a position to write 



"... if the maze was 
real and you were 
being hunted down 

by a pack of 
wolves, they'd be 
as lost as you..." 



anything from a PacMan clone to a 
dungeon exploration game along the 
lines of SSI's Ultima IV. 

I had never attempted to write a 
game of this type before Steve sent 
me his code, but I even surprised 
myself how quickly I was able to 
adapt the Maze Crazy routine to 
produce a fully working and quite 
playable Dungeon exploration game. 
Indeed, the game took no longer 
than 2 hours to code from start to 
finish! Try it for yourself - I think 
you'll be surprised just how simple 
maze games are to code! O 



AMAZE-ING ROUTINE 



WHAT'S IN STORE FOR YOU NEXT MONTH... 

If this month's installment hasn't already got you frantically coding, then just 
you wait for next month's issue. I'll be take Steve's Maze Crazy code one 
step further - that is. into the third dimension. With the knowledge I'll be 
imparting next month, it will be perfectly possible foi you to write your own 
Dungeon Master clone! Can you bear the wait? 



A couple of Amiga Shopper readers 
have written to me In response to 
Derek Dobson's request for a 
routine that generates mazes. After 
playing around with all the entries, 
the two best routines came from 
Pete Lockwood In West Sussex 
and Steve Bennett In the West 
Midlands. Pete's routine performed 
very well indeed, but was rather 
large so I'm unable to print It 
within these pages (perhaps I'll 
pass it on to Cliff for Inclusion in 
the listings section). Instead I've 
included Steve Bennett's routine 
which generates mazes from data 
tables held within the program. 

The Maze Crazy 
code is fairly 
straightforward. To 
use it simply create 
some 14x14 pixel 
blocks using DPaint. 
You need only 
create one block if 
you wish, which 
would be part of a 
wall. When you have 
drawn the block, 
grab it as an ICON 
using an ICON 
grabber or load the 
picture into AMOS 
and grab it from the 
screen. The program 
then creates a simple maze. If you 
want to design other blocks then 
simply grab them from the screen 
and paste them on to the screen by 
changing the DATA statements in 
the routine to the number of the 
block you wish to paste down. To 
call the Maze Crazy routine, simply 
issue the command 'PROC 
CreateMaze' from within your main 
game loop. 

REM ** Maze Crazy 

REM ** Written by Steve J 

Bennett 

Procedure CREATEMAZE 

Screen Open 

0,320, 256, 32, Lowres 

Flash Off : Curs Off 

Ink 5 

Bar 0,0 To 14,14 

Get Icon 1,0,0 To 14,14 

Cls 

Pen 30 : Paper 

Y=25 

For T=l To 14 

For X=15 To 294 Step 16 



Read I 

If Io0 Then Paste Icon X,Y,I 

Wait Vbl 

Next X 

Add Y,16 

Next T 

* 

Repeat : Until Mouse Click 

'*** Maze Data 
.... x = Wall Block 
'*** = Enpty 

Data 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1, J 

1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1 

Data 1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, J 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1 




Create mazes with Steve Bennet's 
great little Maze Crazy procedure 
featured above 

Data 1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1, J 

0,1,1,0,1,1,0,1 

Data 1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0, J 

1,1,0,1,1,0,1 

Data 1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0, _I 

0,0,0,0,0,0,1 

Data 1,0,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,0, J 

1,1,1,1,1,0,1 

Data 1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, J 

1,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,1 

Data 1,1,1,1,0,1,1,0,1, J 

1,1,1, 1,0,0,0,0,1 

Data 1,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0, J 

0,0, 1,0,1,1,0,1 

Data 1,1,0,1,0,1,1,0,1,1, J 

1,0, 1,0,0,0,0,1 

Data 1,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0, J 

1,0, 0,0,0,0,0,1 

Data 1,0,1,1,0,1,1,0, J 

1,0,1, 0,1,0,1,1,0,1 

Data 1,0,0,0,0,0,1,0, J 

0,0,0, 0,0,0,0,0,0,1 

Data 1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1, J 

1,1,1, 1,1,1,1,1,1,1 

End Proc 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 




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RAM 


UPGRADES 






CODE 


DESCRIPTION 


RRP 


SILICA 
PRICF 


fm osx 


AMITEK - OK Populated - A500 


E2S 35 


C27J5 


RAH was 


AMTFK ■ 51?. Popuialhd - AfiOO 


f«95 


CM.95 


RAM 0610 


AMITEK • 1* Populated • AfiOO 


mo oo 


C50.00 


RAMOS) 


CBM 51?- Bowd-AtSOQ 


E24.M 


E??.W 


RAM 0501 


CBM -512* Beard -A500 


OS H 


E49.B9 


RAM 09% 


51 & Board - No Clock • A500 


E» BE 


C19.95 


RAM 0510 


51?. Board ■ hie Ckx* - ASOO 


£2099 


C24.95 


EXTERNAL DISK DRIVES 


DRI K&b 


SUVJNE :iV "--I.:.-, '-: uui 


L •') 00 


ES'i.55 


W i960 


ROCUTE -W1l»- Ivory Colour 


ESM5 


£64.95 


CCA £01! 


ROCUTE -3T1M)- Stock Colour 


M8.95 


£64.95 


PRINTERS 


PPI vw 


,&■- ."':. i >'■ Jii ■>■--. 


. ,. 


C1 29.00 


PRI3230 


CBM MPS l?30 9 Pin Dot Main. 


Et 69.99 


£139.00 


COLOUR MONITORS 


M0NS1W 


GOLDSTAR TWMoneor inc. cable 


£199.95 


£17995 


MCH41S4 


CBM 1084S Monrior inc. cabto 


E299 93 


E?49.95 


ROM UPGRADE 


U-GMM|lC0 KV.m^,-. KM ROM Swapper | C24 95 | E1995 



HEWI Compact Design 

36OTi24cm»7on 
78 Key Keyboard 

Vk Intern*/ Floppy Drive 




Built-in TV Modulate 

For connection to a Wevslon 



Silica 

announce a 

NEW LOW PRICE 

ol £299 lor the Amiga 

600, a huge saving ol £100 

the previous RRP ol £3991 With ils 

modem compact wedge shape design and 

the employment of the latest advancements in 

Amiga technology, it represents the very best 

investment lor home computing. It has all the 

power ol a first class games console with a lull 

range of entertainment software available, as 

well as being a true home computer, with 

business and education software and an 

extensive range of peripherals and accessories. 

The Amiga 600 uses state-of-the-art surface mount 
2 1 JOYStick/VotlM Ports f ecnn °'°9y. ,or maximum reliability and features a 3 ■" floppy 
Easy access -located on notit side < " sl! <im ' e ' mouse . TV modulator and smart card slot i 

slot accepts games, ROM or RAM cards (Irom 1 mo up to 4Mb) and will take advantage ol many 

future new developments. The very latest version ol the operating system, Kickstart/Workbench 

V2.05 is used in the Amiga 600 and its enhanced chip set facilities include improved graphics 

resolution, increased genlock support and the facility lor up to 2Mb ol chip memory. The Amiga 600 

is fully compatible with the A670 CD-ROM Drive and Interface which will give it access to a full 

range of CDTV titles and audio CDs.The Amiga 600 is available Irom Silica in several 

configurations (see below) including a specially upgraded 2Mb RAM version. 



IDE Hani Disk Controller 

For 2 : f Hard Disk Drives, (Upgrade 
'""jmax120i»HD 

i Kckstad upgrade tor HD 
support available scon) 

Han) Disk UoM Available 

With 20* 2!f Hard Disk Drive 

Smart Card Slot 

Built-in as standard 

Trapdoor Slot 

For optional plug-m CI* RAH and 
battery backed dock 



FREE GIFTS 

FROM SILICA 
k SEE PANEL TO LEFT 



disk drive, mouse, TV modulator and smart card slot all as standard. The innovative smart card 



of A6O0. in front of disk drive 

Composite Video Output 

Full colour composite video output 
for connectkn to most monitors 



AMIGA 500 
STANDALONE 



1 Year 0n-sft» Warranty 

AMIGA 600 CONFIGURATION OPTIONS 




HARDWARE 

• 512k AMIGA 500 COMPUTER . £299.99 

Inc. 1Mb 3X - Disk Drive, Mouse 
Controller, Power Supply, 
Workbench 1 .3 & Manuals 

• 512s RAM EXPANSION TO 1n RAM . £24,95 

• A520 TV MODULATOR FREE 

nUSI - FREE FROM SILICA 

• PHOTON PAINT V2.0 £89.95 

• ARCADE ACTION PACK £229.78 

• GFA BASIC £50.00 



TOTAL PACK VALUE: £694.67 

LESS PACK SAVING: £395.67 

SILICA PRICE: £299.00 



ORIGINAL 

AMIGA 500 

WITH BUILT-IN 
18-KEY NUMERIC KEYPAD 



£299 

l INC VAT -HelrAMC 11510, 



NEW! 

FROM SILICA 



RAM OPTION 

WITH CLOCK 



• lie AMIGA 600 1 MOUSE 

• iwt, RAM UPGRADE 

• 20« HARD DISK 

• DELUXE PAINT III 

• MYSTERY' GAME 

• 1 YEAR ON-SITE WARRANTY 
PLUSI ■ FREE FROM SILICA 

• PHOTON PAINT V2.0 

• ARCADE ACTION GAMES PACK 

• GFA BASIC INTERPRETER <M 



TOTAL PACK VALUE: 

LESS PACK SAVING: 

SILICA PRICE: 



OMb Hard Drive 



1Mb RAM 



£299.99 
N/A 
N/A 
£79.99 

VARIABLE 



£89.95 

£229.78 

£50.00 



£749.71 
£450.71 



£299 



2MB RAM 



£299.99 
£60.00 

N/A 
£79.99 

VARIABLE 
• 

£89.95 

£229.78 

£50.00 



£809.71 
£460.71 



£349 



20Mb Hard Drive 



1Mb RAM 



£299.99 

N/A 
£299.00 



£89.95 

£229.78 

£50.00 



£968.72 
£519.72 



£449 



£299.99 

£60.00 
£299.00 



£89.95 

£229.78 

£50.00 



£1028.72 
£529.72 



£499 



(CI1TV 

V_/BB8SB 



COMPUTER SYSTEM 
SAVE £200! 



UPGRADE YOUR AMIGA 500 FOR ONLY E399 



We are pleased to announce a very special trade-in offer to 
Amiga 500 owners who are keen to take advantage of the extra 
benefits offered by Commodore's multimedia innovation, the CDTV. 
Amiga owners who return their working Amiga 500 computer (with 
Kickstart V1.2 or 1.3). mouse, power supply and manual to Silica, can 
claim a £200 discount off the price of the new Amiga CDTV Computer 
System. This new system {normal RRP £599) is fully compatible with 
all Amiga software. In addition, it provides access to a vast range of 
CDTV titles. CDTV works much like a standard Amiga 500 or 600 but 
has many additional features including a compact disc drive that can 
hold up to 550 megabytes of information per disc as well as play 
audio discs to a very high quality. CDTV comes supplied with the 
latest infra-red remote control handset, giving you full control of your 
system from the comfort of your armchair. 

a»»i Mini ii i**m 




CDTV SYSTEM 

AMIGA 500 TRADE 



IN 



£599 
-£200 



YOU PAY £399 



£399 

l INC VAT-RetAMC 1250, 



FEATURES INCLUDE: 

• Fun Compatibility With Existing A500 
Software 

• 1Mb Cbip RAM 

• CDTV Player 

• Plays Audio COst 
CD i Graphics Discs 

• FoU QWERTY Keyboard 

• BuilHn Monitor Serial & Parallel Ports 
asontheASOO 

• 8S0K W Disk Drive 

• Mouse Controller 

• Infra-Red Remote Control 

• Workbench 1.3 S Manuals 

• Welcome CD * Caddy 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT - DELIVERY IS FREE. OF CHARGE IN THE UK MAINLAND 



SILICA SYSTEMS OFFER YOU 



• FREE OVERNIGHT DELIVERY: On all hardware orders shipped in the UK mainland. 

• TECHNICAL SUPPORT HELPLINE: Team of technical experts at your service. 

• PRICE MATCH: We normally match competitors on a "Same product - Same price' basis. 

• ESTABLISHED 14 YEARS: Proven track record in professional computer sales. 

• £12 MILLION TURNOVER (with 60 staff ): Solid, reliable and profitable. 

• BUSINESS + EDUCATION + GOVERNMENT: Volume discounts available 081-308 0888. 

• SHOWROOMS: Demonstration and training facilities at our London & Sidcup branches. 

• THE FULL STOCK RANGE: All of your requirements from one supplier. 

• FREE CATALOGUES: Will be mailed to you with offers + software and peripheral details 

• PAYMENT: Major credit cards, cash, cheque or monthly ternis. 

Before you decide when lo buy your new Amiga computer, we suggest you think very carefully about 
WHERE you buy it. Consider what it will be tike a few months after buying your Amiga, when you may 
require additional peripherals or software, or help and advice with your new purchase. And. will the 
company you buy from contact you with details of new products? At Silica Systems, we ensure that you 
will have nothing to worry about. We have been established for almost 14 years and, with our unrivalled 
experience and expertise, we can now claim to meet our customers' requirements with an understanding 
which is second to none. But don't |ust take our word for it. Complete and return the coupon now for our 
latest FREE literature and begin to experience the "Silica Systems Service*. 



MAIL ORDER: 

Order Unea Open: 



1-4 The Mews, Halherley Rd, Sidcup. Kent. DA14 4DX Tel: 081-309 1111 

Mon-SM O.OOanvSMpm No Late Night Opening Fax No: 081-308 0808 



LONDON SHOP: 

Opening Houra: 



52 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1P OBA Tel: 071-580 4000 

MorvSat 30am-6 00pm No Late N*yi1 Opening Fan No: 071-323 4737 



LONDON SHOP: 

Opening Hours 



Selfridges (1st Floor). Oxford Street, London, W1A 1AB Tel: 071-629 1234 

Mon-Sai 9 30am-6 00pm Lata N-giit Thursday unM 8pm Etienson: 3914 



SIDCUP SHOP: 

Opening Hours: 



1-4 The Mews, Hatheriey Rd. Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX Tel: 081-302 8811 

Mon-Sal9.COim-5.30pm Late hSght Friday unH 7pm Fax No: 081-309 0017 



[To: 




MAIL ORDER HOTLINE 

081-309 1111 



SILICA 
SYSTEMS 



m 



S»ca Systems, AMSHP-1 192-80, 1-4 The Mews, Hatheriey Rd, Sidcup, Kent , DA14 4DX 



PLEASE SEND A 64 PAGE AMIGA COLOUR CATALOGUE 



Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms: Initials: Surname: „..„ „ 

Company Name (if applicable): 



r^ 



Tel (Home): Tel (Work): 

I Which computer(s), if any. do you own? 80D J 

E«06 - Aflvertt&W prices and speoficaKons may change - Please return the coupon lw the lalaal Inionnutlon 




Railway CaUarawefcoae Open Moo Fri 8am-6pm. Sal flam -4pm. 

Worn »aay tofrxi.juaj i.5m a»(rom the M62. Easy parking Laava M62 at junction 26. lake A638 to 
Bra*** uphil after about 1.5 m las &juatpe*1 the pa*, turn left onceover a rattway bodge After 1/4mie 
toohtofuBOnWIopposJeaPOmalbox. HOW OPEN SUrOAVS FROM 10-4PH 

A«M Bradford _ 



TRILOGIC 




UNIT 1, 

253 NEW 

WORKS RD, 

BRADFORD, 

BD12 OQP 

SALES 
0274 691115 

FAX 0874 6001 90 

ACCESS, VISA, 

SWITCH, DELTA 

CONNECT 

AMERICAN 

EXPRESS 

FAST MAILORDER SERVICE 
SAMEDAY DESPATCH- 

ORDERING IS EASY 

1 ) Older by phone using you 
crooH charge, or debt card 

2) Order by Mai • sending cheque 
, bankers draft or poetal orders 
made payable to TRILOGIC. 

3) Please add pari postage & 
peeking of £1 00 to orders under 
£100 or £2 00 to orders crver £100. 
48hr datvety - add £3.60. 
Overnight carrier - add £5.60. 
(May take longer for outlying . 
remoter areas. Uk Mainland only). 
Saturday delivery -add £12.00. 
Oatapcet servee svalabie P.O.A. 




A641 HudderalMd 



ASM Dewabuiy 



DESKTOP VIDEO PERIPHERALS 



ROCQEN PLUS ei 39,96 

A superb vakie Gonkxk wall overlay 5. fader controls • RGB pass Thru : 



HANDY SCANNER rae.ge 

I n our experience. fWs is by hi the best BW hand scanner « this prin hacket 40udpl 84 level grey 

Scale. excellent Dala^jnprcteseVxjIJsofWsie . . " 

ROC KEY £229.99 

The ideal partner forme RocOsn Pkrs. This add-on •Keylnj' um enablse proreesfcnal effects such 
Chroma keykiQ, klrr,, keying , *M ffiwg h. Grachic. overlay, key wtrdow et 

"1CI12 . mm . 

RQBSPLfTTER Roaibolype C57.98 

£48898 Frame grabber, coburdfcjMser a genlock r, one „,». 

t41898Fr»megrabber4cckKirdigrbeer ki oneurel.v. . 

£14*98 



■& 



COLOUT.PIC .. 



'Subject to goods being In stock 8 
orders recerved before 2.30pm. 
Goods remain our property until 
paid for In fuK 

EXPORT ORDERS WELCOME 
Deduct 1 7.6% vat, contact us tor 
carriage charges. We export daily 
to most countries. Payment In 
Sterling only please. 



RFNOALE M02 GENLOCK _ 

RENOALE SUPER H 6VH« QEHLOCM«ja.t»SrmiprofeasDnal SVHS Genlock - excesem value 
Foreground & background modes; Super VHS input A output: Composite video input 7 output 
hardware controlled lades; cross fade Am iga to video; fade to Week; several powerful -«ms 

02 VOEOCENTRE PLU»_ CI MOM SVHS Gerta* • •: 

OPALVISION 24BI Graphics & Video system E788.89Complet»wrftOratf pairtiOpal 
Presents 24 M graphics & presentation packages t King of Karate - the first 24 Wl game I 
EPSON QT 6000 FLAT BED COLOUR SCANNER £»1 9 89 IS.? M«fron cotours; 256 level grey 
scale 300dpi resoWloa 

LHQMEW MEDIASTAT10N 
DIGIViEW QOmDIGITISEFI(lhebestlorijsevvilhacamera) +CHGIPAINT3* 
tevELANPERFOflMEH. ALL3FORJUST £139,» 



SPECIAL TRILOGIC PRODUCTS 



5 PORT PRO-MOI INTERFACE 

Ourunlqua 5 port Midi irrrerfeoa has In, Out AThru 

sockets plus two addirxmal swfchabta Out or Thru 

sockets (or Ingenious vafaaWey So you can have 1 

la, 1 out * 3 thru, or t In, 1 thru A 3 out, ot 1 la, 8 

outsft2thrul 

FuHyoonpatMe with a*) Amiga Midi software. & 

moat key boards 

NOW ONLY C24M 

Extra Midi feed 1.2m £1,96 
Extra Midi lead 3m £3,» 



STEREO SAMPLER 2 

Our Superb sourvfrg STEREO SAMPLER 2 uses an 
expensive stale of the art AjD cWp which samples so 
fast, * captures every data*, of the sound Ease/ 
adjusted Level control connecting (sad suppasd Fu»/ 
competibfewl^ollpopulsisemrjejig aoftwere. 
FRff STBeK) &AMPUHQ SOFTWARE wth 
variable sseipk rata (upto «000 m- pies per 
second In mono, 23000 samptn pet second In 
•moot, vsrLsbfe replay speed, * edited cow aianda 
;. NOW ONLY £3*t» 



SUPERFI 2 STEREO SYSTEM - HI Fl QUAUTY. 

We've looked high * low for a roWHVUL, TOP QOALITy Saxso speal* sysh« fcr ti-» w* 
Computers, keyboards, Stereo VCRs, Sa»«e Systems 4 Wafcmana Nr»» wave found one- It is a 20 
watt par channel, drrerty maro powered, 3 way speaker systam It has Base, bebie a votuate oontrob 
A cornea wan connecting leads Frequency response 32Hi - 30KHZ. ONLY CS«,9P 

»WO AVA-LASLE - ZYF1 STEREO SYSTEM Ino ser^tfe luhe pev^ Mprxy £32H 



MICE & JOYSTICKS 



ULTIMATE PRO ANALOGUE 

JOYSTICK >.... 
Superb low coat anocth ecton Analogue 
w th fire button on the and. pAa preeSaUe X & Y 
trimmers, MbrcewtOh fbe buttons; ainoftre (not nil 
games support autoirs) Ideal for ffigM simulator* 
see (Not all games support analogue |oyst.cks) 

OnfyCIB-W 



AMIGA ROM SWITCH 

Our Keyboard operated Two way Ron. twitch vnabtoa 
you to use edhe* ot 2 Workbench roma. To switch over, 
just hokf down ConttoVAmija/Amiga keys untiyou hear 
A bleep. (Release them before the bleep to 'warm sUrt 
wih fta current rom. FNs A5OQ/60O*W30/ 
1SO0V200O 

SIMPLE TO FTT - MO SOCDERHO. 
Only CT7.ee (sacf roraa) 

Fftlinq nvaWalft* cx-mrxUftr wsnsmy unkres 
feed by us> FBIng charge £1 5 00 
Please state which you have Amiga whan 
ordering. 

SPECIAL PRICES 
ROM3HARER41.3 POM CM.M 

ROM SHARER & 2.01 ROM £04,90 



MOUSE / .H5YSTCK PORT SWITCH 
£12.9© 

* Has sockerts for mouse & joystick 

* Push button selects mouse or jcysUck 

* Uses no power unika other type*. 

* Ccmpetlbto witti many donqfea. . ■; 

* Saves wear & tear on mouaa pott 



NAKSHA MOUSE. 




OPSUTION STEALTH OUR PRICE- 124.96 


Irrotades Uouas slat A hoMer 


BUDGET REPLACEMENT MOUSE 


C149S 


SOUICK MOUSE" :.,.,.-;.• . 


CI 6,99 


CDTV KEYBOARD 


£49 99 


CD TV TRACKBALL CONTROLLER 


C6999 


GRAVIS MOUSE STICK 


CBS.99 


DELTA H ANALOGUE JOYSTICK 


EI4 9B 


PRO QUALITY ANALOGUE JOYSTICK CI 9 99 


2IPSTICK AUTORRE ._ 


cuse 


MEGA STAR HEAVY DUTY JOYSTICK E2e 99 


SPEEDKINGAUTOfrPJi ; 


CI 1.99 




C37.98 




case 


MOUSE HOLDER . 


cise 


JOYSTICK EXTENSION LEAD CM) 


CZ49 


PC ANALOG JOYSTICK CONVERTER C7J» J 






DISKS S. DISK BOXES 



ANTISTATIC. LOCKABLE, WUH 
TINTED LD lr DIVIDERS. 

20 SIZE FLIP TOP BOX El 99 

4Q50SIZE LOCKABLE BOX ....C6 99 

80 SIZE LOCKABLE BOX C7.99 

100 SIZE LOCKABLE BOX CS.99 

160 CAPACITY POSSO STACKABLE 

DRAWER TYPE C199S 

TDK BRANDED he labels In Plaatc saxege 

bos -pack often ■„. CB99 

UNBRANDEDInclaMk- CS 99,10 

3.6' DRIVE HEAD CLEANER .. . C4.99 
Use regularly for greaser reHaMlty 



SPARES , ACCESSORIES & MISC 



KJCKSTART t.3 ROM .„.;...,...... £2B90 

KJCKSTART2ROM ONLY«8.90 

OFnClALWKBNCH2UPQRADeKIT €79.1*8 



FATTER AGNUS S372A 

SUPER DENSE 

OARY _ .,.. 

8520A (OCHIP (Dflve4 prnter port) 

ASM MODULATOR 

AMiQA INTERNAL DRIVE NOW £69.90 

MAINS SUPPRESSOR BLOCK4WAY C1299 
UPRATED AS00 POWER PACK 



C30.99 

€38.99 
F38.9S 
£15.90 



EXTERNAL DRIVE POWER SUPPLY Q9.B* 
This new product powers up to 3 external Am Iga 
floppy dok dflfttt By relieving ttie Amiga power 
supply of this burden (for which I was not 
designed), you w« Increase ts reasbMy 
cc^isiderabry. Just plugs straight in. 



AMIGA REPAsR SERVICE 
Fined price repairs • Amiga 500/5004 
£4890 Inc parts A labour. (Eicludea 
drive, psu & keyboeid mechankial 
faults) 

HOW TO AVOID REPAR 
BILLS FOR 3 OR 5 YEARS 
Sim pte • take out an Extended 
warranty on your com puter, m ontor 
or printer, within 30 days of 
purchase, A ALL repair btls - from 
breakdowns A ACCIOENTa {eg 
sp4lagee) are covered, Computers 
under £400 - 3year Extended 
warrrtiy only £49 99; Byear warranty 
■ only £08.99. Please enquire for 
otha (terns 4 to confirm priceS- 



FUCKER FREE VIDEO 2 £184.9© 

Fits Inside your A600.500. 1 600 or 2000 A eeminalaa wtncylng Sckaf 
* Requires VGA or Muftisync monitor. • Compatible wHh ALL Am Iga video m ot 
" Overscan copabilfty for full screen display. • No visible scan Inea. 

SUITABLE 1 4' Mmm Dot p«lch VGA cc*our monitor (no audio) £229 09 



PRINTER PORT EXPANDERS 

FOR USE WITH PRMTER& OAMPLERS, VDEO DUITrSERO, 8CANNCR0 ETC 

Theee compact fuly Swkrhad Eapaneion bo* as enaba, you to connect upto four 
pertpharaki to your computet The connectors on the una are the same type as the 
Computer's printer connector so your periperab ^ pkrg straight ri A oonnectmg lead - 
2m or 300mm long (state which) is suppasd free, to an Una Expander to the computer. All 
26 connections are swfched. ensuring total tooettlon of *l connected device* 

2way - £24.99 Sway - £27 99 away - £29.89 



TWO WAY SCART SWITCH C17.8© 

TNa compact swlch box converts meat Tvs A Tv monitors to DUAL SCART INPUT. Thus 
you can connect your Amiga A your VCR to tw one scan: socket on your Tv. A push 
button sw itori selects input one or input 2 Both RGB, Audio A Video inputs are swsched 
Also suitable for osnneetJng aesstile receivers (VCR can then record direct from satette). 
whilst watching tv or saietkte. 



'M BACKUP UTILITIES 


XCOPYPHO C33.9B 


Lrrtast versCn - corflpMrstwUti Cyclone 


external drive adaptor Highly successful 


CYCLONE AOAPTOR CI 299 


AMI SUPERCARO CM 99 


(Requires an external drive) 


OTHER DISK UTirTSES 




ACTION REPLAV FOR A600 — 


.CB7.98 


ACTION REPLAV FOR 2000 .... 


,CBT,o» 


N B. M skirvg becsups vrlhout the perm Un 


of the oopyrigM holder is <egsl. 




EDUCATIONAL 


BETTER MATHS (t»16) 


.£19 90 


BETTER SPELUHO(»r) 


.C1999 


COMPENDIUM 8 


C29S0 


DATAWORD _.._ 


. £1399 


DINOSAUR DISCOVERY KIT . 


.£17.99 


FIRST SHAPES (M) 


.£12.99 


FIRST LETERSi WORDS (J-8) £1299 


FUN SCHOOL4 RANGE 


£1999 


FRENCH MISTRESS NEW . 


.£1899 


GERMAN MASTER 


£1899 


ITAUAN TUTOR: ._;:i: 


.£1899 


JUNIOR TYPIST (5-18} 


.£19.90 


K10STYPE 


.£18.99 


LETS SPELL SERIES 


.C14.99 


UNKWORD LANGUAGES ... 


.£2189 


MAQIC STORYBOOK 


- CI 7.99 


MAGIC MATHS ._ _, 


.£17.99 


MATHS TALK (5-tJYRS) 


.£1899 


MATHS TAL FRACTIONS 


. £10.99 


MATHS MANIA 


.£1999 


MAVIS BEACON TYPING „ .. 


.£2499 


MICRO MATHS 


.£1999 


MICRO FRENCH 


.£1998 


MICRO ENGLISH „ 


.£1899 




.£1888 


MONEY MATTERS (4-7YRS) .. 


.£ia99 


PAINT ME A STORY (3-10) ... 


.£21.99 


PLANETS 


.£24.99 


PUZZLE BOOKS 1 & 2 ... 


.£17.89 


SPELL BOOK „.., 


. £1899 


TARGET MATHS <4») 


. £13.98 


THINGS TO DO WITH.. SERIES £18.99 



VOYAGER 1.1 ...„:_..:. . £69.99 

WEATHER WATCHER £1889 

WORLD ATLAS,! £38 88 



TOP 30 GAMES 



AWARD WINNERS £17.99 

BOARD GENIUS „......:. £20 99 

CHAMPIONSHIP MANGERS ,.::J>17.8B 
CARL LEWIS CHALLENGES .. .. £17.99 

CIVILISATION ...„.;.£Si4.»8 : 

EYE Of THE BEHOLDER £24.99 

FINAL FLIGHTS £1799 

FIRE A ICE _ £1799 

GRAHAM TAYLORS SOCCER . £17.89 

GLOBAL EFFECT £1998 

GRAND PRIX £2499 

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE £17.99 

INT E RNATL SPORTS CHALL . . . £1 9 88 
JIMMY WHrTES SNOOKER .....£I7.«» 
JOHN BARNES FOOTBALL ... . C17 98 
MAN UTD IN EUROPE £17.99 

M1 TANK PLATOON £24,99 

MEGATRAVELLERS2 .... C19BB 
MONKEY tSLNO^r £2689 

MYTH.. £1788 

OMAR SHARIFS BRIDGE £24 88 

THE PACIFIC GENERAL £20.88 

PACIFIC ISLANDS TEAM YKEE £17.99 
PLAN 9 FROM OUTR SPACE £2098 
PRO TENNIS TOUR £1/99 

ROBIN HOOD... £74 99 

SENSIBLE SOCCfP (17.W 

SILENT SERVICE £2489 

VIKINGS £2498 



BOOKS 4 VIDEOS 



• DISK INCLUDEOWfTH THESE BOOKS 

AMIGA FOR BEGINNERS £1488 

AMIGA BASC INSIDE a. OUT .. £21.88 

C FOR BEGINNERS £17,95 

DISK DRIVES INSIDE 8 OUT ... C27.9S- 

DOS INSI0E * OUT £22 96- 

DESKTOP VIDEO £23 95' 

GRAPHICS INSIDE a OUT £31 85 

IMAGINE COMPANION £2496' 

LITTLE BLUE WKBENCH BK .... £14.95 
MAKIN MUSIC ON THE AMIGA £27.89* 

MAPPING THE AMIGA £2096 

USING AREXX ON THE AMIGA £28 SB" 

USING DELUXE PAINT £19.86 

USING IMAGINE 2 £24.86" 

USER INTERFACE MANUAL .... £1*88 

HARDWARE REF MANUAL £21.95 

ROM KERNEL REF MANUALS - THREE 

AVAILABLE EACH £2886 

V1DIA PAGESTREAM GUIDE ... £495 

VIDEOS BELOW - ALL £1488 SBOtl 
HOT ROD YOUR AMIGA - owers addng 
peripherals to your Amiga 
AMIGA PRIMER - covers what beginners 
should kno. atxMA50CV20OOa 3000, 
AMIGA GRAPHICS - learn about creating 
graphic art 

ANIMATION VIDEO Vols 1 8 2 
Useful demo videos showing animation 
techniques. 

DESKTOP VIDEO Vofl Learn the rede 
story on Amiga desktop video. 



TOP AMIGA PROGRAMS 



ALL SOFTWARE UK SOUHCED 

ADVANTAGE £69 99 

AMI ALIGNMENT £4299 

AMIBACK £44.89 

AMAS 2 .,.. £89.99 

AMOS £34.99 

AMOS - EASY £2899 

AMOS 3D... „£2SJr» 

AMOS COMPILER £2299 

ART DEFT PRO £14869 

AUDITION 4 ....£3898 

AUDIOMASTER4 £5488 

AUDIO ENGINEER CI79.98 

BARS* PIPES ..ft09.98 

BBC EMULATOR £3889 

BROADCAST TITLER 2. ._ £189.88 

CAN DO 1.8 £89.89 

CASH BOOKCONTRLR £5488 

INCLUDING f IN«L AC'S 
CROSS X» £27 88 

DAYBY0AV eagg 

DELUXEPAIVT4 13 . £84 99 

DELUXf MUSC C48 8S 

OELUXlvlCCOJ C74 89 

DEVPAC3-newve-sroe ....£5189 
DGCAL. C2996 

DIRECTORY 0FV C2B 99 

DISKMASTFR £3999 

DISK MASTER 2.... £4888 

DRTsTUERCUB . £7998 

E TYPE £2999 

EXPERT CRAW £4898 

EXPERT 40 JNR £3798 

EASY AM - £28 88 

EXCELLENCE £5889 

EXOTIC CARS FOR IMAGINE .. £3488 

FLOW vJO ;...... £5488 

GB ROUTE PLUS ..£6999 

GOLD DISK OFFICE NEW £88.88 

HIGH SPFFD PASCAL CSBB 

HISOFT SASrC PROFESS . C6988 
HOME ACCOUNTS 2 ... £38 » 

HOMF.6- . C2A8B 

HOTUNKS CM 99 

HYPERBOOK .. £4488 

IMAGIN 2 C18888 

IMAGINF CfLfCrsC'S* C849B 

MTROC4CI-S C7489 

KlNDWCPfSS C3889 

LATTICf CvfvRAKC .£18988 

MACRO 88000 ASSEMBLER £3898 
MAILSHOIPLUS . . £3988 

MAXIPLANV4 C48 98 

MEDIA SHOW £54 88 

MEGAM'« MAS-FR NrW f-29.99 
MINI OFFICE . £4498 

MUSnx.11 BARGAIN £5489 
MUSIC* .'.VCR £3989 

PAGESTFAW?? £*689B 

PAGEStlltP? . £4499 

PENPAI £6498 

PERSONAi TAX PLANh.£R . £2888 
PERSONAL FINANCE MANG .. £24.88 

PROFESSIONAL CALC £138,98 

PRO0ATA £75.98 

PROFESSIONAL DRAW V3 £8998 

PROFESSIONAL PAGE 3 _. £188.88 

PROFEXTV&62 £9988 : 

PROWRrTE V 32 ._ £88.88 

QUARTERBACK £4498 

OUARTHRBACKTOOLS £49.98 

QVARTET _.:.„:.•: £37.88 

REAL 3D BEGINNERS ..._.._...£7888 

SCALA500 :...._. ..£7488 

SCALA PROFESSIONAL CI 89.98 

SCULPT 30XL £109.89 

SCULP ANIMATE 40 JNR £7888 

SOUK .„..>;. , £34.99 

STEREO MASTER £29.88 : 

SUPERJAM £8998 

SUPERBASE PROF 4 £18988 

SUPERPLAN £6888 

SYSTEM 3» • _ £5898 

TAKE2 £3899 

TECHNOSOUND £29.88 

rOPFORM £68.88 

TRANSWRITE £2888 

ruRBOPRINT PRO ONLY ..... £37.99 

TVSHOW. £67.98 

VIDEO EFFECTS 30 - £8899 

VIDEOSCAPE30 ....£5899 

VOYAGER t.t ._: £8888 

WORD PERFECT 41 £16888 

WORDWORTH 1.1 £7888 

XCAD2CO0.. £109.89 

3D PROFESSIONAL £1 49.88 



OUST COVERS 



SEAL n TYPE KEYBOARD 

•--"*y. : '' : start 

Doot risk spk leges • they're ausrsrssed 
to Write esT your Are Iga. 
Fl ■ SEAL N TYPE. 
Waterproof & moulded to fs snugly over 
eech key. but rkMtjre enough to type thru 
AMIGA 500. 5O0.. 1500.2000 .. . £1299 
State which when ordering pktaaa. 

ANT1STAT1C DOST COVERS. 

AMIGA 500 > 600 Plus £489 . 

AMIGA 600/600H0 £499 

AMIGA15O0I2O002PIECE £1298 

AMIGA I50020C0 KEYBOARD. C399 

36' EXTERNAL DRIVE £349 

8833 /1 084 MONITOR £7:98 

SWIFT 8 LC2O0 PRINTER £7.88 

SWIFT 24/LC24-200 £7,88 

, MANY OTHER TYPES AVAILABLE 




TRILOGIC - ESTABLISHED 1984 A NAME YOU CAN RELY ON - 
PHONE US NOW ON 0274 - 691115 



AMIGA 600 WILD. WEIRD & WICKED £329.99 



AMIGA 600HD EPIC PACK £479.99 



AMICA0OO 
1 1 MEG RAH 
. 3.8" DISK OfllVE 
» WORKBENCH 2 
. BUILT IN TV UOOULATOR 

PLUS 
. DELUXE PANT 3 
.ORANDPRH 
.PUTTY'*'' 
• PUSHOVER 



■ enquire (of price It 
availability of pacha without 
eoftware 



AMIGA aoOHD 
•1 MEG RAM 
« 3.8" DISK DRIVE 
> 20 MEQ HARD DRIVE 
. WORKBENCH 2 
. BUILT IN TV MODULATOR 

PLUS 
. DELUXE PAINT 3 
. TRIVIAL PURSUITS 
• EPIC 
.ROME 
.MYTH 

ADOC39FOR 
2MEG VERSION 



AMIGA 500 1.3 £289.99 



':' FBEE12MONTHS ON-SITE WARRANTV 
3 It 5 YEAR EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVA»bVE- 



SAVE UPTO 
£100 OR MORE. 

With all An Iges we wll grve you 

1 discount each vouchers worth 

40% oH the manufacturer* RRP of 

the Top 30 games. Eg a £24.99 

game would coil just £1 4.99 X10 

f I oo saved. The dearer the 

game- the more 

you save. 



•BUILT-IN DISK DfllVE 

• 1MEO RAM* 

•MOUSE 

■TV MODULATOR 

•WORKBENCH tA 

>12 MONTH WARRANTY 

'FREE 912KRAM 
4 CLOCK EXPANSION 



FREE 1/2 

MEG 
UPGRADE*, 




J 



We can .uppty I IB our Rom SwKcfl conptoUwHl 
2.04 ram for hast CB4.88 without Invalidating your 

eierrenty. • . 

»>10STAR GAMES PACK- JUST tia»» EXTRA. 
V »> BARGAIN BAGS- JOBS 

ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 



AMIGA 1500 £559.99 



Includes software pack 

> 1 MEQ RAM com prising: Dpalnt 3, 
>TWW15 - 0HrVE8 Home Accounts. The 

> WORKBENCH 2 Works, EH. Toki, Puzznlc 

> SEPARATE 4. "Get the Moat horn Your 

KEYBOARD Amigaf. 

AMIGA 1900/200 ADO-ONS 
8 MEG MEMORY CARD (utlpDp) ET8.8B 
1 meg ^SIMUa2,4.or 8 requited 124.96 
V SCSI CONTROLLER CARD £80.08 



LOW COST 

EXTENDED 

WARRANTIES 

For only E44.98 

your Amiga can be 

covered against 

repairs due to 

breakdown & 

ACCIDENTS for 

three years. 
Covers ALL parts 
& labour. Must be 
taken out within 30 
days of purchase. 



MONITORS & TV MONITORS 



PHILIPS CM8833mk2 
E189.SS 




> 14- SCREEN 

> STEREO SOUND 

> ROB It COMPOSITE INPUTS 
>ON SITE WARRANTY 

» LOTUS TURBO CHALLENGE 

> OFFICIAL UK MODEL 

> DUST COVER ET.B9 
CONNECTING LEAD £3.99 



COMMODORE 1084S 

£239.98 

> LATEST UK MODEL 

> 14" ANTIGLARE SCREEN 

> GREEN SCREEN SWITCH 

> STEREO SOUND 

> ROB I. COMPOSITE INPUTS 
>DUST COVER E7.M 

CONNECTING LEAD £3.98 



GOLDSTAR TV/ 14" ULTRA HIRES 

MONITOR VGA COLOUR MONITOR. 
£179.99 £239.9* 

> 14" SCREEN (Requires Flicker Fboer) 

> FULL REMOTE CONTROL > ANTI GLARE SCREEN 

> SCART SOCKET (r g b in put) > .28m m DOT PITCH 

> SUPERB PICTURE > 10a4x7«8 PIXELS. 

> OUST COVER er.s» > Nomnd. 

> CONNECTING LEAD £3.88 > LEAD C3.M 



TV TUNER - Suitable lor uaa Klttl PMlpa A Commodore men Mam - ONLY £38.88 



MONO PRINTERS 



COLOUR PRINTERS 



SAVE upto 
£30 or mart 

5 Dscouft 
voociws-th 
svtiyaontcr* 
ater. - ete above 

fO.LW.jfcl 



CITIZEN 130C- BUDGET MODB. ONLY £120.00 

9 pin pr Inter with 1 44eps dfatt A 2Scp* Near letler quality print speed. PuM 
bade* A friction feeds. Three fonts . Epson &IBm emuWions. 



CITIZENSWIFT9 SUPERS QUALITY POR ONLY £166.90 

9 pin printer capable of i82cpe draft, 48cps NLO printing speed Four buiR-in 
fonts. Frktton & tractor feeds. Paper par* -saves having to remove ©ominous 
paper when you want to use single sheets. Low cost ribbons. 2 year warranty. 
Epson A IBM Proprinter em utattons. Low noise level 
cmZENSVVin'OXWWecarrisoevsfBk>nofabov» £319.90 



CITIZEN SWIFT 2240 COLOUR £239.99 

1 92cps draft. 04cps NLQ. a sib pet led version of the Swrt, 
24, sir* Bar print quaJfty. 



CITIZEN SWIFT 9C SUPERS QUALITY FOB ONLY £198.99 

9 pin printer capable ot '92cps draft, 46cps NLQ printing ipeed. Four 
bu«t-in toots. Friction A tractor feeds Paper part: - saves having to remove 
oonrJnouB paper when you want to use single sheets. Low cost ribbons 2 

yeoiwarmiry. Epson A IBM Proprmhv emulalioni Low noise level 



CITIZEN SWIFT 340 SUPS! B NEW MODEL * ONLY 

24 pin printer wflh 240cps draft & 80 cos letter quality print speed. Nine letter 
quaRty fonts, 2 scalable letter quality lonts. Paper parking, push & pull tractor 
teed, friction feed. Epson LQ570. NEC P20 A IBM proprinler24»e em ulations. 
Ultra tow noise level. * quiet mode for even lower ncase. 2 year warranty. 



NEW 



CITIZEN PROJET INKJET LA SB) QUALITY PRINT £419.99 

300dpi Laser qualrry SO nozzle INK fet printer. Fast A very qu-M. 360cp* draft A 
240 cps letter quatty print speed. Three letter quality fonts » optional font cards. 
HP DeikfetPtos em Liattori Optional 128k 4 25«fc ram cards. 100 sheet.' '.': . 
automate feeder. Optionel tractor teed & second sheet leader. 



RICOHLP120O 6PA0E /MINUTE LASER PRINTER £679«vat 

Low price 6 peg* per m inure. 300dpi laser printer 400dpl capabftty with 2» eg 
ram upgrade (Windows 3 400dp) driver available). Sharp edged printing 
resotutton enhancment. Pull A4 graphics w|h standard 2Meg ram . HP LaserJet 
III com petit**. w«h PCL5 & HP QU2 capability 8 scalable resident loots, 14 
resident bi mapped fonts Can prim on OHP film A card upto 1 7Bgsm . Serial A 
Paralk* ports & 1 year on-site warranty. Low running costs, 2Meg Ram 
upgrade - EtB9,99 Toner - £79.00 

OPC cartridge (drum) • £99.99 2nd paper feeder bin • E109.99 

FREE DRIVER DISK WITH ALL CITIZEN PRINTERS 
Printer lead Just £3.99 extra with all printers. 



CfTtZEN SWIFT 240C SUPERB NEW MOOEL I. ONLY £209.99 
24 pin printer with 240cps draft & 80 cps letter quality print speed. Nine 
letter quafty fonts. 2 scalable tetter qualrry fonts Paper panting, push & 
pul tractor feed, friction feed. Epson LQS70. NEC P20 & IBM 

prcpiinter2>taeemulatJons. Ultra tow noise level, » quiet mode for even 

ta w arnoiee, 2 year warranty. - ..':.'. : " ■ 



THE NEW CITIZEN 240 PRINTERS. 
You won 't believe the print quality 

AVAILABLE IN MONO A COLOUR VERSIONS 
These new printers feature im proved performance, tower noise level 
■ ore fonts, scalable fonts, easy to use control panel A m ono or colour 
versions. With even clearer print quality. A Incredible colour graphics 
quality, we have yet to see a better primer tor even twice the price. Can 
print on OHP film A envelopes. A fhe quarter sire prim feature enables 
peges for Personal organiser to be printed. For more com pleat printing. 
the internal 8k buffer can be expanded to 40* or 136K. 
FuRy compatible win the Amiga A virtually al other corn puters • drivers 
available for Microsoft Windows too 

FREE PRINT ENHANCEMENT DISK 



HARD DRIVES 



SUPERB GVP HARD DRIVES 



'PRICES 
DOWN 



OVP SERIES II HD8. K Hag lor AS00 - now only cue.Be 

GVP SERIES II HD8.ia0mag tor A500- now only £429.98 

QVP SERIES HHOe»240meg for A900. now only £688.88. 

Tha HQ8 Sanaa II oan acoapt aither 1 or2or 4. 1 magsimmi. or 2. 4 mag 
slmml 

AS3032Hao Hard drh/a 4 88030 Acoatoralor for ASO0 CaS8.ee 

ASM 1 ZOMcg Hard drtva 4 08030 Accetorator tor ASOO C7S9.ee 
AS30 2dOMeg Hard drive 4 68030 Accelerator for ASOO £98a.PeThe 
TheASSO Combo* feetureaSeosoaOMHzcpu,! meg ram expandaUeto 
Smega. 64642 mathaco.prooeaaor aockat, power auppty, cooling tan, mM- 
axpanalon alot. SCSI hard disk controller 4 hard dbk as specified above. The 
A630 run at (SHIPS compared to standard Amiga's B7MIPS OVP 68482 
UATHS CO-PROCESSOR KIT for AB30 COMBO £208.88 

QVP SERIES II HCS fo.A1500.MOO - NO DRIVE £118.88 

GVP SERIES « HCB* 52mog for Al 500.-2000- now only C278.ee 

OVP SERIES I HC8 « 120meg tor A1500/2000- now only C40e.Be 

OVP SERIES I HCS •240meg for A1S00/20O0- now only £64808 
The HC 4 Series II can accept upto 8. 1mags8Slmmsln2meg slaps. 

1UEG SIMMS FOR GVP DRIVES £24 BB 
4UEG SIMMS FOR GVP DRIVES 



..•••: CONNOOORE AS80 UPGRADES 

AseOISOmeg QUANTUM SCSI upgiade-eeay wm £348.88 

AS804Smeg NEC SCSI uporade - eaay lo fH CI 69.98 

ASBOlOBmeg NEC SCSI upgrade -eeay to fit C25e.ee 

ASOO MEMORY CHIPS C24 9BMEO 

AMIGA 600 HARD DRIVES 

20Meg 25" bare drtva £89.89 

40Meg2S-ba.ed.fve C178.ee 

W I J 2J" b ar e drtva ■'.■ C2ieee 

SOMag 26" bale drive £248.88 



CUMANA COM301 STS06 DRIVE INTERFACE ES8.88 

. Featute 1/2 meg ram A battary backed clock, plus ST506 HD hiterfac* 



ACCELERATORS & EMULATORS 



KCS POWER PC CARD FOR AMIOA BOO ft 800 PLUS E190.9S 

KCS ABOVE without MS DoM : ClWJW 

AMIGA 1500)2000 KCS ADAPTOR £64.99 

VORTEX AT ONCE PLUS 296 PC EMULATOR FOR ASOO £219.99 
Thrs is a 16MHz PC card for the Am irja500,SOO'-.f 600^000, enabangyour 
Am iga to run PC software. No sotoenng insutMion. VQA, EOA A CQA PC 
grapfscs modes supported; runs as a task on the Am tOK supports hard 
dnves 80287 socket. 

VORTEX aOLDEN OATE 396 CARD FOR 1BOO/2000 C44B.OQ 

The very latest PC Card for the At 500/2000, using a 3*6 cpu running at 
2SMHi IDE drive interface. 1.4*2 S3Ub F30 com.otor. CGA^GA/v-G A ft 
Hercules emulation, 80387 socket etc. Rune as a lass; runs Windows 3 In 
386 Mode. Holds upto 18Mb rant - 4Mb can be used by Amiga 

MORE GVP HARDWARE 

aVPPC2e01«MHz EMULATOR for Series I Hard drives C184.W 
This is a plug-in module for the QVP HD8 Series II hard drives. As it ftts Inside 
the QVP. there is no risk of voiding fhe com puter wmanty aaa wrfflocher 
internally fining emulators. Runs most PC software Inc Windows. A supports 
EGA/VOAXJGA, A Hercules graphics uses the ASOOs Irternai drive to read/ 
write MSDos deks (720k). 80287 socket 

G -FORCE 03O-25MHf Accelerator lor AlSOazOOO Im rsm £569.99 
O^ORCEKK>40MmAccel«rs<wforA15ClV20^ £790.96 

Q-FORCE040-33MHiAcoeleiMorfo(Al5rX/200a4m (am £1909.99 
QVP SIMM-32 32brt Imeg SOna slmm tec A630* 0-Fo«ce £S5,90 
GVP SIMM-33 32M 1 meg *0nsslmm for A530 4 O-Force £154.90 
GVP SIMM-32 32t* 4meg 60na oJmm for AS30 A G-Forca ClfM.98 
IV24 24BIT PROFESSIONAL VrOEO CARD for A3000 El 379.99 

AMIGA 150O2000IV24 Adaptor £44.90 

The IV24 features: 24b* x \e Million cotours, saparataRQe A Composite 
Genlocks. Rr^i time frsma grabber FlK.ar atunir.alor - grves A15O0/2000 

owners the added bonus of abutt in flicker ftxer; Simultaneous ROB. 
com posit a A 8-VH S outputs - m asee video recording easy: Picture in picture 
display; Arexs supported FuH software control Includes special IV24 
©catons of Seeks, Callgari A Macropaim software.; / 



PCs FROM ONLY E339 + VAT 



:-::.: :tOW COST TR1LOQIC 'ATLAS' PCa 
286-16 Inc Mono white VGA monitor, 1 meg ram, from : £33a*val 

3eesx2B tnc 14" svoa colour monitor, 1 mag ram, from C499*-wet 

386rfx40 10014" avoe colour raonhor,2megrara,from £966«»t 

486dx33 Inc 14' svoa cotour monitor, 4owg ram, from £77V->«al 

*e6dxB0lnc 14"»vg« tx>lour monrtor, 4meg ram, from £960- vst 

Prices above include 2Xt.44meg 35' drskoVivea. but no hard drive 

Add £1 OOfval for 40meg HD or £1S0* vat for 86meg HD (1i3,8' FDD on 

Hard drive models) 130 A 212 meg HDsaloos-ailabte. . 

Upgrade your PC - Lew coat Motherboards, Caaee, monlors. 

-. keyboards. FDOs, HDs, VGA A I/O cards available. j 



EXTERNAL DISK DRIVES 



ROCLITE HF382C SLIMLINE DRIVE £56.99 

CUMANA CAX 354 3.5" DRIVE £59.99 

All drives feature thru port & disable switch 

Using note than one external otive ? - you need our Ealemaj H/Ke 
Spotter unit - see oppos<e page for details. J 



MEMORY UPGRADES 



AMIGA 300 PLUS 1MEG MEMORY UPGRADE E3699 

Just plugs in No S4Dklering,Werranty unaffected 



A500/SOO+ l/2meg upgrade without clock C7V99 
ASOO ,' 50O+ l/2meg upgrade wRh clock A battery £34.99 
Just plugs in. No soldering. Wan anty unaffected. 



AMIOAeOOImeg upgrade • clock (unpopulated) £2999 

AM IGA 600 1 meg upgrade, dock complete C49.99 

Just plugs in No solder Nig. Warranty unaffected 



ASOO/ 500+ 1/2-4 MEG MEMORY UPGRADES 

THE ONLY WAY TO GET MORE FAST MEM* 
BASEBOARD PLUS unpopulated £79.99 

BASEBOARD PLUS with 1 MEQ £99.99 LOWER 

BASEBOARD PLUS with 2 MEG £124,99 PRICES 

BASEBOARD PLUS with 4MEG<max) £174.99 

Usee k^ cost 266*4 Drains- special otss* 1m eg tor £24.99 
*By Internal fitting - invalidates warranty unless fitted by us. Fitting charge 
C 1 0.00 plus postage. Also available for Am Iga SOO 1 .3. State m achine -.he 
ratderinfl. • 



OTRLOOC1SSS. ESOf PrtOM chaiaM arallXMa cuirairltkn iris day you orOar -oceaiiona>y, aotna may have c*ar<fa> atN*r ny aloe- thla adverTMarnail « 

ORDERS FROM PLCs, LOCAL GOVERNMENT & EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS WELCOME 



icomphnad (3J*m) 



1.B MEG A500UPQRADE fully populated NOWONLY £59.99 

AMIOA 1 5OO/200O 8 MEG MEMORY CARD . V £79.99 

V USES 1 MEG -B SIMMS £24,96 EACH 



PRINTER & MONITOR LEADS 



AMP1 1.8m LONG PARALLEL PRINTER I FA D £9.99 

AMP2 3mLONQ PARALLEL PRINTER LEAD C12.99 

AMPS 3m LONG PARALLEL PRINTER LEAD £16.99 

M PI 25WAY MALE -F EMALE LEAD 2m LONG £1 0,99 

MM1 29WAY MALE -MALE LEAD 2m LONG £10.99 

MM2 36W MALE -MALE LEAD 2m LONG 1299 

PRINTER SHARER 2WAYINC LEAD £21.99 

2 PIECE UNIVERSLA PLASTIC PRINTER STAND £7.99 

UNIVERSAL METAL PRINTER STAND A PAPER HOLDER £12.99 
lACROSSB/adhealve LABELS ■pprox 35"x1.S 1000for £7.99 
CONTINUOUS 60gm PAPER 11'KftfT box of 200 I o* £21.99 

RIBBON RE-INKING SPRAY. Jet bin* - saves E££s £11.99 

MONO RIBBONS £4.99 each for; CITIZEN 120O/SW1FT 0247224/124; 
OTARLCia2ffLClfy24-10NB2*1QNX10TJO; AMSTRAD DMP200O/ 
30CKV31 »XV4000/RCW625rj; BROTHER HR1,-M100Q-MI224; 
COMMODORE MP6801/S03; OK1 1 82/1 92!32G'32. IPANAfiOfttC 
KXPIOBinOBO; SHINWA CP80; EPSON UX/FK'RXOVIOO 
ORIGINAL COLOUR RIBBONS ALL AT ., . £15.99 

for: SWIFT 9/24/224 LC10.LC20. 1 LC2CQLC2S-20Q (State which) 
TAfLOREO PVC PRINTER DUST COVERS £7.96. For popular 

Cilicen 4 S'.rv printers ■ pHytooale** prinlerwhon or'donog ■■ 



AL1 FORTVs WITH SCART SOCKET (NotforVCRa) £13.89 

Including Sony. Philips, Ferguson, Hitachi, Toshiba, M rtsubrshi etc 
AL2 for Ferguson McO1/McO3/Mc0SwKh 8 pin Din aockat £12.99 
AL* for HttecN/Qranada seta with 7ptn Dtn ROB inpU C1Z99 

AL6 for Amatrad CPC464/61 28 monitor (with no sound) £12.99 
AL6S for new Amalrad CPC atareo monitor £1Z99 

ALT for 1064s monitor with a pin Din socket £14.89 

AL7Pfo*10931064e/ee33wtth9plnD socket £14.99 

ALU wfeh9pln D plug tor mullsync monitors £12.99: 

AL12 with 1S pin3rcw. riochet for muklsync monitors £1399 

AL13w«h 15pln 3 row plug for multisync monitors £13.96 

FLICKER FIXER LEAD - plug to ISway 3 row plug £1190 

MODULATOR EXTENSION LEAD dlm-nates overhang £10.00 

MONITOR PLINTH 1 fits over Amiga A supports monRor £23.99 

MONITOR PUNTM 2 sb above plus ehetf under monaor £33.99 

DELUXE MONITOR STATION fits over Amiga . ' £49.99 

Includes monitor/com puter 1 piece PVC dustccvat. tnous* mat & 
fcyslfck/rnouse extension sockets. Both plinths have cut out for dnVe 
access A holes 1or mouse/kjy sock extension sockets... 

Monitor Station has cut out lor hard drive as welt' 

MOUSE A JOYSTICK EXTENSION KIT FOR PLINTH 1 ft 2 £7.99 pair 
MONJTQRTlLT/SWrVs^BA«iv<upt0l4"rfKmr^^ £12,09 



issing the complete set? - well get your back issues NOW while you can! 



i."* 



v**,. 



**1 




m"**. 




1 



% 



\ SOLD OUT 

Buying a paint package plus reviews of Pagestream, Colourpic, Sequencer 1 , KCS Powerboard, and Scala. 

3 Accelerating the Amiga plus reviews of Bars & Pipes, Daatascan, ATOnce, DynaCADD and BASIC languages. 
Buying a printer plus reviews of Pro-24, Real 3D, Wordworth, TEX, Imagine and Superbase 4 

S> Amiga Answers special plus reviews of Spectracolor, Superbase 4, Touch-Up, Action Replay, VideoCenter Plus and more 
The most comprehensive review ever of Amiga word processors, plus the Video Toaster and a free fractals guide 

"f SOLD OUT 

A hardware and add-on buyer's guide special, tons of tips for ProfessionalPage and an in-depth look 
at the HAM-E colour system 

§ The definitive guide to the A500 Plus, down-loading satellite imges, choosing sequencng video : 

OlUff HO 



I 




••• 



T MISS 091 



^Q, Special graphics issue featuring the Amiga's top art packages. Audition 4, Sound Enhancer and desktop video directing with Showmaker 
\\ Insight into CDTV, a complete guide to printer preferences, 24-bit graphics, reviews of Genesis, Turbo Print and Stereo Master 

* ^ Drive guide special - all the facts and advice on hard drives, quality video output with Impact Vision-24 card, DCTV graphics and more 

4^ FREE Tracey plus special animation tutorial, test drive of Roc Tec's new hard disk, Amiga CD, Pixel 3D, Superbase. A definitive 
memory guide and the biggest Amiga Answers ever 

* 4 Round up of best hand scanners, 5-page special on RAM boards, first in the series on Artificial Intelligence plus reviews of 3D animation 

packages, RayDance, Expert Draw and a preview of the new Easy AMOS 

» e PD special - a guide to the most indespensable PD programs and an in-depth review of PD postscript, part two of the series on 
Artificial Intelligence plus reviews of ImageMaster, SaxonScript, SuperJam and 23 pages of Amiga Answers 
A fc 200 Top Tips of essential Amiga advice, a guide to setting up your own bulletin board, programming a neural network plus reviews of 
Hotlinks, Hit Kit and Professional Calc 

,,-t DTP Special: the best package; high-end DTP hardware and typography tutorial. Midi sequencing, digitising and processing 
pictures for videos, plus reviews of Visionary and Mini Office 
■\ft Amiga Answers special - 32-page guide to identifying the source of any Amiga problem, plus picture processing with Imagemaster, MIDI 
coding , 3D graphics programming and the start of two new series, Chaos and Computer Life 






M-2 












wt better still, book 






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azsmnD 



JOINT WINNER OF 
COMPUTER SHOPPER'S 

'Best Customer 
Service' 

-AWARD FOR 1$91 - 



PRICES INC.DELIVERY & VAT @ 17.5% 

Express Courier Delivery : 
(UK Mainland Only) £6.50 Extra 



HERE TODAY ~ HERE TO STAY 



iiiii H| 'i ii i >f | i. ii|i |" » |n 



K 



n Micros First. First for choice, prices and service Established 
nine year*, wtlh a »!roog fin 

Otii Computerised Telesales Order Pri 

ellicienl service Well appointed Retail Showrooms with large product 
range on display Our huf ~ " 

repeat custom and pers 

REMEMBER - when you need us, we will still be h 

could eventually bo there as well 



TO ORDER 



Call us now on 

0386 765500 

TELESALES OPENING TIMES : 

9am - 7pm Monday-Friday 

9am - 5.30pm Saturday 



Send Cheque, Postal Order or 
ACCESS/ VISA card details to: 

Evesham Micros Ltd. 

Unit 9, St Richards Road 

Evesham, Worcs. WR1 1 6XJ 




ACCESS / VISA „3^ 
Cards Welcome ^»S^ 

Government. Education & PLC orders welcome 

Same day despatch whenever possible 

Express Courier delivery (UK Mainland only) £6.50 extra 

Please note that 5 banking days must be allowed for 
cheque clearance. Immediate clearance on Bank Drafts. 



Mail Order Fax: 0386-765354 



RETAIL SHOWROOMS 

Normal Opening times: Monday-Saturday. 9.00-5.30 
Late Night Opening Until 7pm Wednesday-Friday 



CAMBRIDGE 



5 Glisson Rood, 

Cambridge 

CB1 2HA 

•B 0223.323898 

lax 0223 322883 



BIRMINGHAM 



251 -255 Moseley Rd. 

Hlghgote 
Birmingham B12 0EA 
ft 021.446 5050 

fox 021 446 5010 



MILTON KEYNES 



320 Wltan Gate. 

Milton Keynes 

MK9 2HP 

-EC 0908.230898 

(o< 0908 230865 



EVESHAM 



Unit 9 St Richards Rd, 

Evesham 

Worcs WR 11 6XJ 

Tt 0386.765180 

fax 0386 7653M 



; 



TECHNICAL 
SUPPORT 



S 0386-40303 

Monday lo Friday, 10.00 - 5.00 



1 YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL GOODS 




[\'.- - : 



. *■ '» C99 00 


UH ■aotav r raw 


KlrKWauU EJ7 95 


AMOS t 3? 50 


•MaiVIl CI2000 


MiSoflLamceC C 10000 


him* i i <s> r « no 


OFA BASIC CompSaf C 24 95 


Dean* In » £ 79 99 


Devpec2 15 £44 95 


\omum VMM ) C 54 95 


Worktwricn Management C 9 95 



AMIGA 500 SOLDERLESS RAM UPGRADES 



A500 512K o8££ 22 99 
RAM /CLOCK Mm£m%M w 

IXMITl/ V.LVSV.l\ INC. VAT AND DELIVERY 

UPGRADE 



ALSO WITHOUT CLOCK 
FOR ONLY : 

£ 1 7.99 



.- CONVENIENT ON / OFF MEMORY SWITCH A AUTO-RECHARGING 
BATTERY BACKED REAL-TIME CLOCK • COMPACT, ULTRA-NEAT DESIGN 



A500 PLUS' 
1MB RAM 
UPGRADE 



THE FASTEST AND EASIEST WAY TO 
UPGRADE YOUR A500+ TO 2MB RAM ! 

Simply Plugs into trapdoor expansion area ft 

| Increases total RAM capacity to 2Mb ChipRAM 

RAM On/Off Switch ft Compact unit size ft 

Only 8 low power RAM IC's ft High reliability 



ONLY £37.95 



1.5MB RAM BOARD 



upgrade 

p ™ «MB FOR ^^ Fully populated board increases total RAM in A500 to 2Mb! ft Plugs 
jail" ^"-** I nam. Into trapdoor area. & connects to 'GARY' chip ft Includes Battery- 
lS\£\It^ Backed Real-Time Clock ^Socketed RAM ICs on S12K/ 1Mb Versions 

Unpopulated RAM board with clock E 34.95 ^.wkStTiSTo" 1 

With 15Mb FASTRAM installed £ 69.99 T2££Z»t££' 



MEGABOARD' 



With our MEGABOARD, you can further 

expand your ASOO's memory to a total of 

2MB wi thou t disposing of your existing 

51 2K upgrade (must be 4 x RAM-chip type. 

or not exceeding 9cm in length). 




ONLY £42.99 



CONNECTS TO YOUR 

512K MM UPGRADE 

TO GIVE 1.5MB 



MEGABOARD needs Kickstart 13 to operate 

(Kickstart 1 3 upgrade available from us lot 

£29 95) Installation requires connection to Ihe 

GARY chip Easy to fotkm instruction* provide* 



A500 EXTERNAL 8MB RAM UNIT 



'.< Throughport tor further expansion 
> Very low power consumption 
-V Style matched to the A500 
.v RAM access LED 




B RAM test/run switch 

ft Available fitted with 2Mb, 4Mb, 

or fully populated with 8Mb 
'.< Optional PSU (allows Amiga to power 

other devices) 

Incorporating the latest 'ZIP' DRAM 
technology, our new External Memory Upgrade 
allows the A500 / A500+ to be upgraded by up 
to a further 8Mb of auto-configuring FASTRAM. 



With 2MB fitted. ..£112.99 with 4MB...£159.99 with 8MB...E259.99 



PARTIALLY POPULATED UNITS EXPAND TO 8MB WITH 2MB laVOJLES. AVAILABLE SEPARATELY AT ONLY £89 99 PER 2MB • OPTIONAL POWER SUPPLY £14 95 



NB Any memory fitted lo In* una a) « 
addition to thai on your machmm alraady. 
to a maximum ol 8Mb on ma mxfrrmi una 



3V 2 " EXTERNAL FLOPPY DRIVES 



AMAZING LOW PRICE ! 

£47.99 

including VAT & delivery 




every quiet 
• Slimline design 
eSuits any Amiga 
eCooling vents 
eSleek, high quality 
metal casing 



l Quality Citizen/Sony drive 
mechanism 

► Enable / Disable switch 
► Full 880K Formatted Capacity 

► Long reach connection cable 

► Throughport facility tor 
addition of further drives 



REPLACEMENT A500 

INTERNAL 3.5" 

DRIVE KIT 



Fully compatible, with 1Mb 
unformatted capacity. 

Straightforward installation 

procedure Kit includes full 

fitting instructions. 



NEW LATE NIGHT SHOWROOM OPENING UNTIL 7PM, WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY • 



[EvesEamHicBsl 



Evesham Micros 



• NEW LATE NIGHT SHOWROOM OPENING UNTIL 7PM, WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY 



TYmFI Amplified Stereo 
^ I "■ I Speakers 



REALISE THE TRUE SOUND POTENTIAL 

OF YOUR 

AMIGA WITH 

THIS PAIR OF 

FULL RANGE 

SPEAKERS ! 

Your Amiga produces tine quality hi-fi stereo sound. 
Enjoy quality stereo sound reproduction to the lull with 
this new design twin speaker system! Incorporates a 
buil-tn amplrlier with separate adjustable volume 
controls tor each spoaKer unit. Runs from PSU 
(supplied) or from batteries (not included). 
Speaker Dimensions l60x95xWSmm (HxWxD) 




ONLY 
£39.95 



TOP VALUE 400dpi 
HANDY SCANNER 



QUALITY SCANNING - AT 
THE RIGHT PRICE ! 

This Image Scanner package 
combines lop quality hardware with 
the latest vorslon ot the distinctively 
powerful DAATASCAN PROFESSIONAi 

VERSION 2 software, now giving 

TRUE GREYSCALE CAPABILITY. 

At a genuine 400dpi scanning resolution, this 

produces truly superb quality scans. Has a full 105mm scanning width, variable 

brightness control and 100 / 200 ' 300 / 400dpi resolution. Daatascan 

Professional Version 2 scanning and odrfing software allows real-time scanning 

In either line art or in up (o 64 simulated grey scales. Provides powerful editing 

foatures and excellent 

compatibility with most DTP 

and Palnl Packages, eg. 

Deluxe Paint 4. Touch-Up 



*f 



ONLY £99.99 



TRUEMOUSE 




WE GUARANTEE that this is the 
smoothest, most responsive and 
accurate replacement mouse you 
can buy for the Amiga. Excellent 
performance, now with a 300dpi 
resolution. Amazing new price! 



O-i/l CkCk SATISFACTION 

£. IH.W GUARANTEED 



GOLDEN IMAGE OPTICAL MOUSE Amiga/ST compatible - 

^eilenl liavel-raccuracy assured NEW LOW PRICE!. 



ROCGEN GENLOCK MK.II 




OFFERING EXCEPTIONAL VALUE 

FOR MONEY, this fully 

compatible GENLOCK 

£ adaptor offers levels of 

quality, function and 

W sophistication not normally 

M available in this price category. 

■» Special features include the ability 

to record graphics & animations on 

video recorders and overlay graphic 

and lext onto video. Capable of 

smooth and stable lading and overlaying 

effects with special tuning knob. 



ONLY £79.99 



ROCGEN PLUS 



Compatible to any Amiga or Commodore CDTV, this NEW 

Genlock Adapter provides Advanced Special Effects and 

Performance Features without sacrificing user-friendliness! 

New Special Foatures include: Dual Dissolve control knobs providing freely 

adjustable degrees ol overlay or invert (keyhole) effects; Auto Video 

,^ - pass-thru; extra Video ihroughport for 

jj g -._ . — separate line monitoring; RGB 

pass-thru for real-time editing 

ot Amiga graphics; plus 

Key-In port for use with an 

external keying device. 




ONLY £119.99 



PHILIPS 1 5" TV/MONITOR 




With its dedicated monitor input, this model combines 

(he advantages of a high quality medium resolution 

colour monitor with the convenience ol remote 

control Teletext TV - at an excellent low price ! 

Features dark glass screen (or improved contrast, 

plus full range 3-way speaker sound output . 



CO AG ftfl Including VAT, 
t&O^.UU delivery & cable 



Philips CM8833 Mk.ll Monitor (Genuine UK version), 

includes cable, 1 Year on-site maintenance 

and 'Lotus Esprit Turbo 2' game 



. E 199.00 



A590 ADD-ON HARD DRIVES 



A590 OWNERS! Expand your hard disk storage further with one ot our add-on, 
externally cased SCSI Hard Drives, with 25ms autoparking NEC mechanisms and 
separate power supply. Plugs into the socket provided on the rear ol the A590 unit. 
External 40Mb SCSI Drive cased with PSU 

to directly add-on to the Commodore A590 C 249.00 

External 100Mb SCSI Drive cased with PSU £399.00 



^=3 



fr AMIGA 6. 



NEW LOWER 
PRICES!! 




Built-in TV Modulator • Built-in IDE Hard Disk Controller 
• Kickstart2 • IMbChipRAM • Accepts Memory Cards 



INCLUDES 12 MONTHS ON-SITE WARRANT*, 
•DELUXE PAINT 1 & EXCITING GAME TTTLEl 



ONLY £279.99 \* 



2MB RAM/CLOCK VERSION £319.99 



COMMODORE'S A600 20MB 
HARD DISK VERSION 



£449.99 S"°" 

2MB RAM/CLOCK VERSION £469.99 



lEvesnamnicr'o'sl 



We are now able to supply 
Amiga A600's with larger 

hard disks. We take a 

standard single drive A600 

and install a high quality 

2Vi" IDE hard drive. 



SPECIAL HARD DISK UPGRADED MODELS 



40Mb 80Mb 120Mb 
£479.99 £529.99 £599.99 <" 



I All models available with 2Mb RAM - Please add £40.00 



NB. The hard QjsA 



,!£!£"££, A600 1MB RAM/CLOCK UPGRADE 



UPGRADE YOUR NEW A600 TO 2Mb WITH 
THIS SIMPLE PLUG-IN MEMORY UPGRADEl 



-Y Simply Plugs into the A600's 
trapdoor expansion area 

> Increases total RAM capacity of 
A600 to 2Mb 'ChipRAM' 

■> RAM Enable / Disable Switch 

ft Battery-Backed Real-Time Clock 



ONLY 
£44.99 




NEW! ASOO ROM SWITCHER 



SWITCHING BETWEEN VERSIONS OF KICKSTART ON 
YOUR A500 IS EASY WITH OUR NEW ROM SWITCHER! 

You can improve soltwaro compalCillty on your ASOO Plus* By tilting our ROM swWchor. 
you can atlemale between ihe tOckWarl 2 already rosldenl and another version ol 
KiekBian ROM chip, giving you iho Iroedom ol choice. 
Fining is very smote Indeed, and requves no soldering or 
special lechncal knowledge Filling allows two methods 
ol switching: either by keyboard reset, or by an external 
toggle switch. N.B. Kickalart ROM not suppllod. A500 
Revision 5A boards will require circuit modification. 



ONLY 

£24.95 



Ktctotart 1.3 ROM supplied separately only £29.95 

Kickstart2.0ROM supplied separately only £39.95 

ASOO Revision 5 A PCB Circuit Modification Service - C 29.91 



TRACKBALL 




■ I-;- (performance ttaeMiaJ dtad fca w peOte I ■ 

I Amiga or Atari ST Plugs into mouso or joystick 

pod Super-smooth and accurate - you probably 

Wont want to use a mouso again alter using 

this Trackball I Full one-handed control Top 

quality opto-mechanical design, giving rugh 

speed and accuracy every time. No dnver 

software needed I 



PRINTERS 

Prices Include VAT, Delivery 
and Connection Cable 



JqJU Registered 
'Star Dealer 

EVESHAM MICROS STAR PRINTERS INCLUDE 

12 MONTHS ON-SITE WARRANTY 



STAR LC20 9-Pin Printer 



ONLY £29.95 



REPLACEMENT POWER SUPPLIES 



Genuine Commodore Amiga A500 

type replacement Power Supply 

Unit. Good quality 'switch mode' 

type. Super low price ! 




ONLY £39.95 



I Replacement Power Supply (or A590 Hard Disk e 49.95 




ONLY £129.99 



SUCCESSOR TO THE 

BEST SELLING LC- 10, 

WITH MANY FEATURES 

AND FAST OUTPUT 

Providing superlative 

paper handling, four 

excellent NLQ fonts 

and a new super-fast 

print speed of 1 BOcps 

in draft and 44 cps in 

NLQ. the LC20 

appropriately 

supercedes the 

phenomenally 

successful LC10 I 



STEREO SOUND SAMPLER 



Ottering tul compotlbiMy with almost any Amiga auo*o digitiser package, our Sound 
Sampler leatures excellent orcuitry, yielding proteaslonol results. The main A/D 
converter gives a digitising resolution ot up lo 50KHz. with a fast slew rale. Two phono 
sockets are provided tor stereo line input. ptua an option tor microphone. Adjustable 
gain is achieved with bult-in 
control knob. Complete with public 
domain disk containing sound 
sampling applications / utilities. 



ONLY £29.95 



MIDI INTERFACE 



Our hilly compatible, high quality MIDI interlace connects directly with the Amiga 
serial port and provides IN. OUT S. THRU ports lor good flexibility. Features 
LEO indicators on each port for 
diagnostic purposes 
Superb compact design! 



ONLY £19.95 



VIRUS PROTECTOR 



Star LC24-200 COLOUR Printer 



COMBINES HIGH QUALITY 
24-PIN COLOUR PRINTING 
WITH EXCELLENT 
VERSATILITY - AT A 
BUDGET PRICEI 

•24-Pin 7-Colour Printer 

• ZOOCps draft / G7cps L.Q. 

• 222cps High speed draft facility 

• 30K Buller expandable lo 62K 
•Swivel Selectable Push or Pull Tractor, 

with bottom leed capability 

• Advanced Paper Parking 

• Electronic Dip Switches 

• 10 Resident LO fonts 

• Includes Colour Ribbon 




ONLY £269.08 



Star LC 200 9-Pin Colour, 4 fonts. 180/45cps.. 
Star LC 24-20 24-Pin. 4 fonts, 180/60cps .. 



..£193.88 
.£204.45 



Automatic Sheet Feeder lor 10" LC printers (pls.slate model)... £ 64.95 

Star XB24-200 COLOUR 24-pin, 80 col. power printer E 368.95 

Star XB24-250 132 column version of XB24-200 f 438.28 



Our compact Vbus Protector fits eesdy to Via Port ol the test disk drive m your f 
protecting all internal and external 
drive! from boot block viruses 
Incorporates a switch to enable or 

dhafala tie predion (it IV- 



ONLY £6.95 



VIDI-12 Amiga video digitiser package n 
Amiga 500 Dual Cover 

Amiga 600 Dust Cover 



;. VIDI-Chrome... 



£ 1 10.00 
Z 4.95 
..S 4% 



Citizen Swltt-24E including COLOUR kft £ «9.99 

Hewlett-Packard DeskJet 500 - c 359.99 

Hewlett-Packard DeskJet 500C (Colour) ~ £ 529.00 

Canon BJ-10EX Inkjet Printer £233.83 

Epson LX400 budget 10" carnage 9-pin 180/25cps £ 139.00 

Epson LQ100 24-pln 180/60cps, 8k buffor £205.00 

Panasonic KXP1124I uprated 24-pin model 300/1 OOcps £279.00 

Panasonic KXP2123 good value 24-pin colour model "" 



'ROOM OPENING UNTIL 7PM, WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY 







*? 



*^&&>- 




FROM THE MAKERS OF THE WORLDS BEST SELLING AMIGA MAGAZINE 

The Amiga Format 
Annual 19 



Past 

We look back at all the big Amiga news of 1 992 

Present 

We look back at all the big Amiga news of 1 992 
We look back at all the big Amiga news of 1 992 




What a year it's been! We've seen an Amiga revolution, with new models out, the A570 CDTV drive 
shipping and the promise of even better Amigas to come. And it's not just Commodore that's been busy 
- news of amazing new hardware and software developments has come thick and fast. 

To put the year in perspective and to find out what's on the cards, we're grilling all the experts, 
hardware and software manufacturers to find their veiws on where the Amiga is headed. For a year in 
view, plus exciting news of what's coming up, make sure you get the Amiga Format Annual. 





• MAIL BYTES 



Orders & Enquiries 081 974 6767 



AMIGA Software 



Phone for prices on our huge 

range of Amiga leisure, business & 

creative software 



AMIGA Hardware 



Amiga 600 £Call 

Amiga 600HD ECall 

Amiga 1500 ECall 

Amiga 590HD ECall 

Amiga & Monitor ECall 

Commodore 1084SD2 £197 

Philips CM8833 MKII £197 

512 Exp+ Clock £29.99 

512 Exp £24.99 

1Mb Simms (70Ns) £25.99 

4Mb Simms (70Ns) £1 10.00 

A600 1Mb Exp + Clock £44.99 

A500+ 1Mb Exp £36.99 



GVP Hard Drives 



PRICE DROP Call for the now even 

lower prices on Great Valley Products' 

Hard Drives, Accelerators & Video 

Boards 



Accessories 


Auto M/ J Switch 


£12.49 


Amiga to Philips Midi 


£5.99 


Amiga to Sony Scarf 


£8.99 




£7.99 


Parallel Printer 


£3.99 


All Serial Cables 


£6.99 


Citizen Swift Stand 


£24.99 


Mouse Mat 


£2.75 




£8.99 


TechnoPlus Mouse 


£13.99 


Amiga 500 Soft Cover... 
Amiga 600 Soft Cover... 


£3.25 

£4.25 


Tractor 3.5" Labels x IK.. 


£9.99 


Disks & Boxes 


Highest Quality Bulk Disks 
50x 3.5" Bulk Disks £23.50 


100x3.5" Bulk Disks 


....£45.25 


200x3.5" Bulk Disks 

500x 3.5" Bulk Disks 
1000x3.5" Bulk Disks 
80 Cap Disk Box 


£89.50 

£178.25 

£356.75 

£4.99 


Posso 150 Cap Box 


. £19.99 




Bubble Jet Printers 


Canon BJlOex 


...£225.00 


1 Oex Sheet Feed 


£58.99 


Canon BJ300 


...£359.00 


Canon BJ330 

BJ Ink Cartridges 


£469.00 

ECall 



Remember all our prices include 2-3 day delivery. 
Add £4.50 for Next Day Courier Service 



Orders by Fax:- 081 974 6102 or Orders by 
Mail:- 3, Enterprise Way, Teddington, TW1 1 



THE NEW LIBRARY WITH NEW IDEAS 

We have inshop computers, so most programs can be viewed. 
All disks individually wrapped in self seal packets. 

AMIGA DISKS £2.00 EACH INCLUDING POSTAGE SAME DAY DESPATCH ON ALL 
ORDERS BEFORE 4PM. 

CATALOGUE DISK 50p FREE WITH ALL ORDERS 
BELOW IS A SMALL SELECTION OF OUR LIBRARY 

PLEASE TELEPHONE FOR NEW AND UNLISTED PROGRAMS 

Shareware may require separate payment to Author if found useful 

ED0S BUDGET RANGE COMMERCIAL GAMES FROM £4.99 



GAMES 

MISSION X RAID + 
SEA LANCE + 
TRUCWN (2 DISKS) + 
SKYFLYER + 
STAR TREK (2 DISKS) + 
AMOS FRUIT MACHINE + 
DRAGON TILES + 
DR. WHO + 
ZEUS + 
F0RMUA1 
CHALLENGE + 
SAVE THE TREES + 
RAID III TOTAL FIRE + 
WOTSrrSNAME + 
PRO TENNIS II + 
21 AMIGA GAMES + 
AIRMANIA + 
AIR WARRIOR + 
BALLOONACY + 
TOTAL WAR (RISK) + 
JACKS BLACKJACK + 



mamas 

FORMS UNLIMITED + 

BUDGET FINANCE + 

JOURNAL + 

600 LETTERS + 

BUSINESS 

CARD MAKER + 

AMICASH + 

TEXTPLUSV3 + 

TEXT ENGINE V3 + 

BASE AND SPREAD + 

B-BASE + 

A-GRAPH + 

POWERBASE V3.23D + 

AMIBASE PRO H + 

IN BUSINESS (3 DISKS) + 

U-EDIT + 

BANKIN + 

O.E.D. + 

AMIBASE V3.76 + 

ANALYTICALC 

(2 DISKS) + 

LAST WILLS 

TESTAMENTS + 



UTUITIF,S 

L<VBEL MAKER + 
FILE MASTER + 
NO CLICK + 
D-COPY II + 
SID V2.0 + 
MESSY SID II + 
BOOTXV4.5 
POWER PACKER + 
FREE COPY V1.4 + 
ELECTRO CAD + 
60 FONTS 
(DPAINT ETC.) + 
MCAD + 
ICON MAGIC + 
VECTOR KIT + 
CASSETTE LABELER + 
HARD DRIVE UTILS. + 

ORDER A CATALOGUE FOR 
LOTS MORE PROGRAMS 
AND SECTIONS. DEMOS 
ETC. 



BUY 10 DISKS GET ONE FREE 



Please make Cheques Payable to Classic Software 



CLASSIC SOFTWARE 

71 Park Street, Cleethorpes. South Humberside DN35 7\B 

TELEPHONE OR FAX (0472) 359957 

Authors Please send Programs for evaluation 



KCS Power PC Board 



On stand 
4610 at: 




PC EMULATION 
FOR YOUR AMIGA 



x\bout.... 

The KCS Power PC board is a complete 
#HMhz 1Mb PC sub-system that can be 
fitted to any Amiga in minutes. 
Based around NEC's highly successful 
V30 CPU, the Power PC Board offers a 
very high degree of compatibility at 
machine language level, yet runs faster 
than an equivalent Intel 8086. 
The 1Mb of Autoconfig™ memory can be 
accessed by all current Amiga models 
including the A500 Plus. Even the original 
A500 can access 512K as a standard expan- 
sion with clock; plus a 512K RAM disk. 
Adored by critics and users alike, the 
KCS Power PC Board is a real alternative 
to buying a complete PC clone. 

Installation 

The KCS Power PC board fits to any 
Amiga in minutes: 

• On A500 and A500 Plus machines it 
simply slides into the trapdoor expansion; 
and doesn't invalidate your warranty! 

• On bigger Amigas, such as the 
1500/2000/2500/3000, it drops into a 
vacant Amiga slot using the custom 
designed adaptor board. 

• Once fitted, your Amiga can be 
switched into PC mode simply by clicking 
an Icon. Just reset and it's an Amiga again. 

No fuss, no hassle. Just two machines in 
the space of one. 

Video 

• Supports the majority of EGA and VGA 
modes in 16 glorious colours and 
monochrome - graphics up to 640x480 and 
text too. Interlace is required for some 
modes but a software flicker fixer is built in. 

• Other video modes include MDA and 
CGA text and graphics. Also supports 
Tandy colour graphics adaptor and 
Hercules monochrome. 

• EGA and VGA graphics can be dis- 
played on a domestic TV or monitor. 
Unlike real PC's, no extra hardware is 
required. 

Disk 

• Up to four Amiga drives can be con- 
nected to your system and accessed in 
PC modes as 3.5" 720K or 5.25" 360K. 
Typical disk access is at least twice as 
fast as most real PC clones! 

• DOS can be started from any mount- 
ed drive 5.25" or 35" and most Amiga 
hard drives. 

' Supports most popular hard disks 
including GVP Impact, Supra and A590 
(Omtl and SCSI). 

• A massive 200K ramdrive (up to 8Mb 
with expansion) is available in PC mode 
and it's PC-reset proof too. 

Memory 

• Even with a base Amiga 704K is free 
for DOS programs (640K in EGA and 
VGA modes). 

• EMS (expanded memory) is supported 



allowing you to run Microsoft Windows 
without- problems and store massive files 
in Lotus 1-2-3. So, if you have 8Mb on 
board, the PC can use it. 

• XMS (extended mrmory) is supported 
- even though this is not usually possible 
on NEC V30 machines. 

Speed 

Its landmark speed puts it way ahead of 
many true PC systems - it even compares 
favourably with many AT clones. 
However, the crux of the matter lies with 
the video speed; and this, as many critics 
have noted is where the KCS Power PC 
Board scores over all others. It's no use 
having a wizz-bang processor if the screen 
takes several .seconds to redraw itself. 

• Tests in text modes have shown it is 
several times faster than even AT clones 
with dedicated video hardware. Even in 
graphics modes, it's no slouch although the 
emulation is limited by Amiga hardware. 

• Add a processor accelerator card, and 
the 32-bit clean KCS cache software will 
use it to its full advantage. 

Mouse 

• Automatic serial mouse emulation is 
supplied as standard - using your exist- 
ing Amiga rodent. 

• Mouse can be configured as COM1 or 
COM2. 

Joystick 

" Up to two sticks can be employed at 
any time. You decide how they are 
arranged. 

Printer 

" Your Amiga's parallel port is accessed 
as LPT1 in PC mode. 

Serial 

" DOS usually supports two serial ports, 
but one is taken by the Amiga mouse. 
The Amiga's serial can be set as COM1 
or COM2 as desired, ie for MODEM etc, 
up to 19200 baud full-duplex. 

Sound 

• PC sound is supported, but there's an 
additional volume control available in 
software. 

Works On.... 

• All Amigas (except the A10O0) fined with 
Kickstart 1.2 and Workbench 1.2 or higher. 

• Extra memory is not required, but full 
use will be made of extra hardware, like 
accelerators, flicker fixers, modems etc. 

Help! 

• We want you to get the most out of 
your system so we offer a comprehen- 
sive, free telephone helpline service to 
all registered users. 

Updates.... 

• Since the hardware is a complete PC 
in its own right, all updates are com- 
pletely software driven. Registered users 
can update at any time for a nominal fee 
to cover media and shipping costs. 



"PC emulation Is a contentious Issue - but the KCS Power PC board is the 
only one to carry my personal recommendation. It is an excellent product 
that does all it claims and does it well." 

comments Mark Smiddy, co-author of Mastering AmigaDOS 2. 



PRICE 

including MS-DOS and on-board memory E219.95 inc VAT/Carr 

Excluding MS-DOS but incl on-board memory £189.95 inc VAT/Carr 

Adaptor for 1500/2000/3000 £74.95 inc. 

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INFOFILE (Database) 

0RALLTHREEF0RAFANTAST1C 

* N . B . These titles are^Plus/AGOOcompahbl. 



LISTINGS 




THIS MONTH: CONVERTING BETWEEN 3D OBJECT FORMATS 




ere's a great program for 
three dimensional 
modellers. By Vander 
Roberto Nunes Dias of 
Brazil, It will convert 3D objects 
defined in Impulse's Imagine to the 
format required by Aegis' 
Videoscape3D. 

The program is written in Amiga 
Basic, so it should be a breeze to 
convert to HiSoft Basic, and fairly 
easy to convert it to other dialects 
such as GFA Basic. The program 
itself couldn't be easier to use: just 
enter the names of your source and 
destination files (including path 
names if necessary) and away it 



Convert your 3D objects from 
Imagine to Videoscape3D format 
with this handy Amiga Basic 
utility. Remember: we pay £20 
for any programs we publish 



goes. Bear in mind that colour 
information cannot be translated 
with 100 percent accuracy. 

Many thanks, Vander, for your 
entry. We'll be sending you £20 for 
your efforts. 

As always, we're interested in 



submissions for any application in 
any language, but we can't print 
programs that rely on binary files. 
What we'd especially like to see, 
inspired by Vander's utility, is a 
program to convert between the IFF 
picture format and picture formats 



used on other machines. We're 
offering a special prize of £50 for 
the best of these we see. 

Pop your program on an 
AmigaDOS disk (along with source 
code if it is compiled or assembled), 
include a written description and 
send it all to: 
Listings 
Amiga Shopper 
Future Publishing 
30 Monmouth Street 
Bath 
BA1 2BW 

Include an SAE if you want your disk 
returning. (& 



'* Converter - Impulse's IMAGINE1.0 to J 
Aegis's VTDEOSCAPE3D * 

'* By MEGANISMOS VIRTUAL MOVTE, April- J 
1992 * 

'* Programmed by Vander Roberto Nunes J 
Dias, Vitoria-ES (Brazil) * 

DEFDJT A-Z 

WINDOW 1, "Converter IMAGINE- J 
VIDEOSCAPE, VI. - by MEGANISMOS" 
Paradel : 

Call subroutines to ask user for source and 
target file names, to copy the source file across 
to the RAM disk for an Increase in performance, 
and to open the files 

GOSTJB AskFiles 
GOSDB TransfSource 

IF FileErr=l THEN PRINT "Press any J 
key" : T$=INPUT$ ( 1 ) : GOTO Paradel 
GOSDB OpenFiles 

The variable Rec' is a pointer into the source 
file. Here it Is set to the field which holds the 
number of points In the 3D object 

Rec=159 

GET #l,Rec ' Get high byte of word. 

NumPoints=ASC (Byte$) *256 

GET #l,Rec+l ' Get low byte of word. 

NumPoints=NuniPoints+ASC(Byte$) ' Camp J 
lement the integer. 

Rec=Rec+2 

ProxRec=Rec+12*NumPoints ' Beginning J 
EDGE. 

PRINT "Number of points on source J 
object : " ;NumPoints 

The next line stores the required header 
information in the Vldeoscape file 

PRINT #2,"3DG1" 
PRINT #2,NumPointB 
'***** Point conversion ***** 



PRINT "Converting points..."; 
Px=POS ( ) : Py=CSRLIN 
FOR Loop=l TO NumPoints 
LOCATE Py,Px:PRINT Loop 

The following retrieves a point from the source 
file In X,Y,Z format and stores it in the 
destination file 

GOSDB ReadPoint 
PRINT #2,X,Y,Z 

NEXT 

LOCATE Py,Px:PRINT "OK.";SPACE$(10) 

Rec=ProxRec+8 ' Point to Number_J 
Of _Edges . 

PushRec2=Rec+2 ' Save EDGE pointer. 

GET #l,Rec 

NumEdges=ASC (Byte$) *256 

GET #l,Rec+l ' Get low byte of word. 

NumEdges=NumEdges+ASC (Byt J 
e$) ' Complement the integer. 

ProxRec=PushRec2+4*NumJ 
Edges ' Beginning FACE. 

Rec=ProxRec+8 ' Point to J 
Number_Of_Faces 

GET #l,Rec ' Get high bits of J 
Number_Of _Faces . 

NumFaces=ASC(Byte$)*256 ' Save. 

GET #l,Rec+l ' Get low bits of J 
Number_Of _Faces . 

NumFaces=NumFaces+ASC(Byte$) ' Final J 
value of Number_Of _Faces . 

The pointer to the Face Information in the 
source file Is saved. The Information Is then 
skipped for the moment while the colour table is 
translated 

PushRec=Rec+2 

Rec=PushRec+6*NumFaces 

Token$="CLST" 

GOSDB FindToken 

Rec=Rec+6 



DIM Colors (NumFaces) ' Prepare to J 
read Colors Table . 
PRINT "Converting color table..."; 
FOR Loop=0 TO NumFaces-1 

GET #l,Rec ' Get the RED value. 
Rec=Rec+3 ' Skip the GREEN and J 
BLDE values. 

' I use only the Imagine 's RED J 
value, don't forget! 

Colors (Loop) =ASC(Byte$) ' Save the J 
color . 
NEXT 
PRINT "OK." 

Now to return to the Face data and convert It to 
Vldeoscape's format. First the saved position of 
the Faces must be restored to the variable 'Rec' 

Rec=PushRec 

PRINT "Number of faces on source J 
ob j ect : " ; NumFaces 

PRINT "Converting FACES..."; 
Px=POS ( ) : Py=CSRLIN 
FOR Loop=l TO NumFaces 
LOCATE Py,Px: PRINT Loop 
GOSUB ReadFace ' Return Edgel, J 
Edge2 and Edge3. 

Register=PushRec2+Edgel*4 ' CalculaJ 
te EDGE position acording to actual J 
Edgel. 

SWAP Register, Rec ' Point it. (hereJ 
is a pointer to PNTS) 

GOSDB ReadWord ' Read number of theJ 
first point of the first edge. 
L(0)=Word 

GOSDB ReadWord ' Second point of J 
the first edge. 
L(l)=Word 

SWAP Register, Rec ' Return to FACES. 
Register=PushRec2+Edge2*4 ' CalculJ 
ate EDGE position acording to actual J 
Edge2. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



LISTINGS 



SWAP Register, Rec ' Point it. 

GOSUB ReadWord ' First point of theJ 
second edge. 

L(2)=Word 

GOSUB ReadWord ' Second point of J 
the second edge. 

L(3)=Word 

SWAP Register, Rec 

Register=PushRec2+Edge3*4 ' Same toJ 
Edge3. 

SWAP Register, Rec 

GOSOB ReadWord 

L(4)=Word 

GOSDB ReadWord 

L(5)=Word 

SWAP Register, Rec 

This Is the heart of the converter. Any redundant 
points In the faces are removed 

ExistingPoints=0 
P(0)=-1 

FOR Loop2=0 TO 5 
Loop3=0 
WHILE Loop3<ExistingPoints 

IF L(Loop2)=P(Loop3) THEN Skip 
Loop3=Loop3+l 
WEND 
Skip: 

IF Loop3=ExistingPoints THEN 
P (Exist ingPoints) =L(Loop2 ) 
ExistingPoints=ExistingPoints+l 
END IF 
NEXT 

The following sorts the face points into order 

FOR Loop2=0 TO 1 
FOR Loop3=Loop2+l TO 2 

IF P(Loop2)<P(Loop3) THEN SWAP J 
P(Loop2),P(Loop3) 
NEXT 
NEXT 

A=P(0):B=P(1):C=P(2) ' The three J 
different points on actual face. 

PRINT #2,3,A,B,C,Colors(Loop-l) ' J 
Finally write the face on target. 
PRINT #2,3,C,B,A,Colors(Loop-l) 
NEXT 
CLOSE 
CLS 

PRINT UCASE$(SourceName$) ;" convJ 
erted... press any key to restart." 
ERASE Colors 
T$=INPUT$(1) 
GOTO Paradel 

The following subroutine asks the user for the 
name of the file to be converted and the name to 
be used for saving the resultant file 

AskFilee: 

CLS 

PRINT "<ENTER> without a name ends J 
the program." 

INPUT "Source filename (Imagine) J 
: " , SourceFile$ 

IF SourceFile$="" THEN CLSsEND 

PRINT "<ENTER> without a nam returnsJ 
to first question." 

INPDT "Target filename (Videoscape) J 
: " , TargetFile$ 

IF TargetFile$="" THEN AskFiles 
RETURN 



The subroutine 'OpenRles' opens the first file 
specified by the user to be read, and opens the 
second file ready to be written. The first source 
file, copied to RAM: for speed, is opened as a 
random access file; the second is a sequential 
file, Its data being saved in a strict order 

OpenFiles : 
GOSUB CheckSource 
IF FileErr=0 THEN 
OPEN "RAM:"+SourceName$ AS 1 LEN=1 
FIELD #1,1 AS Byte$ 
OPEN TargetFile$ FOR OUTPUT AS 2 
END IF 
RETURN 
NotExist: 

PRINT "Error opening source file." 
FileErr=l 
RESUME NEXT 

This subroutine looks at the X,Y and Z 
coordinates of a point in Imagine format and 
converts them to the equivalent co-ordinates in 
Videoscape format 

ReadPoint : 

GOSUB ReadWord 

X=Word: GOSUB ReadWord 

GOSUB ReadWord 

Z=Word: GOSUB ReadWord 

GOSUB ReadWord 

Y=Word: GOSUB ReadWord 
RETURN 

This routine reads a single word (two bytes) 
from the source file. The variable 'rec', which 
keeps a track of where we are in the source file, 
is Incremented accordingly 

' Return in "Word" and increment "Rec". 
ReadWord: 

GET #l,Rec 

Word$=RIGHT$ ( "00"+HEX$ (ASC (Byte$ ) ) , 2) 

GET #l,Rec+l 

Word=VAL ( "&H"+Word$+RIGHT$ ( "00"+J 
HEX$ (ASC (Byte$ ) ) , 2 ) ) 

Rec=Rec+2 
RETURN 

•ReadFace' is used to aid conversion between 
Imagine and Vldeoscape's face formats. The 
routine returns the three edges read from a 
triangular face In the source file 

ReadFace : 

GOSUB ReadWord 

Edgel=Wbrd 

GOSUB ReadWord 

Edge2=Word 

GOSUB ReadWord 

Edge3=Word 
RETURN 
CheckSource: 

ON ERROR GOTO NotExist 

FileErr=0 

OPEN SourceFile$ FOR J 
INPUT AS 1 

CLOSE 

ON ERROR GOTO 
RETURN 



This sets up an 
error interrupt 
and then 
attempts to open 
the user- 
specified source 
file to ensure 
that it exists 



The following copies the source file on to the 
RAM disk for quicker processing 

Transf Source : 



GOSUB CheckSource This bit extracts 

IF FileErr=0 then the filename 

Loop=LEN(SourceFile$ ) from the path 
while Loop>0 held In the string 

Temp$=MED$( Source J 'SourceFlleS' 
File$,Loop,l) 

IF Temp$="/" OR Temp$=":" THEN J 
OkExtr 

SourceName$=RIGHT$ (SourceFile$, J 
LEN(SourceFile$) -Loop+1) 
Loop=Loop-l 
WEND 

OkExtr: 

OPEN SourceFile$ AS 1 LEN=256 
FIELD #1,256 AS SourceBlock$ 
ON ERROR GOTO NotRamDisk 
PRINT "Op en ing RAM:";SourceName$ 
OPEN "RAM:"+SourceName$ AS 2 LEN=256 
FIELD #2,256 AS TargetBlock$ 
ON ERROR GOTO 
IF FileErr=l THEN 
PRINT "I'm sorry, but i need a J 

RamDisk available." 

RETURN 
END IF 
PRINT "Wait 
FOR X=l TO LOF(l)/256 

GET #1,X 

LSET TargetBlock$=SourceBlock$ 

PUT #2,X 
NEXT 
CLS 
CLOSE 
END IF 
RETURN 

NotRamDisk: 
FileErr=l 

RESUME NEXT 

The subroutine 'FindToken' searches the source 
file for a string held in the variable TokenS'. The 
variable 'Rec' holds the position of the string In 
the file; the routine returns If the string is not 
present, 1 otherwise 

FindToken: 
Pointer =1 
Found=0 

PRINT "Seeking ";TOKEN$;". . ."; 
Py=CSRLIN : Px=POS ( ) 
WHILE Rec<=LOF(l) 
GET #l,Rec 

LOCATE Py.Px: PRINT Rec 
IF Byte$=MID$ (TOKENS, Pointer, 1) THEN 
Pointer=Pointer+l 
IF Pointer>LEN (TOKEN$) THEN 
Rec=Rec+l 
Found=l 

LOCATE Py,Px:PRINT J 
"OK."; SPACE? (10) 
RETURN 
END IF 
ELSE 

Pointer=l 
END IF 
Rec=Rec+l 
WEND 
RETURN 



Some program lines have to be split because of 
our column width. If you see the symbol 'J', 
don't split the line when you enter the program 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 1 fl 



NEW PROMOTION 

8833 Mk II Monitor Genuine UK 
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ram pack ram 

£100 gamesvoucher pack 

NEW AMIGA 600 



Fed up with people making up packs 
for you, so as you get 8 great games 

and 2 you hate? 
Well now you can choose your own 

titles up to the RRP value of £100. 

Whether you want budget" or the very 

latest release, the choice is yours. 

WITH FREE MAINTENANCE 

§j only £349 Inc vat 

Or with 8833 Mk II Monitor 
♦Turbo Challenge II Promotion 
only £549 inc vat , 

we cannot be beaten 
on price 



The NEW Adventures Of CAPTAIN DIAMOND 





^^Hft ME ALL NEW EVERYTHING BUT THE KITCHEN SINK PACK 


PtdMie.26 

FinNon 






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AN A600 & ALL THIS FOR ONLY £349.95 


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Sound.2t 


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Airtdock 
Conman 


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PPShow 








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PPType 






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TootaDeamon 






Got.m.4 

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Pisdfc.19 

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TotPIU) 
Typlna Tutor 


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Mhsli Cmd 


iO Attack 


Ruble 


UEdt 


Shrink 3 FF 


P-Corrpre« 






Pocmono? 




WoedPum* 




Judge Ooad. 


P-Read* 






Tr«*kTdvta 


SORKI IK 

Cute Shit 


WORjSMKtl 


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PuJCopy 


Tea Pot 


MahtyMoute 








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Plcha* 










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one nou>. 




WANT A 1500 

With Workbench 2.04? 

GOT A 500 

SWAP IT FOR ONLY £399.95 

ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 




WARNING 

Not reading this carefully could seriously 

damage your wealth. 

Big price increases are immenant, buy now & 

save pounds before Christmas. 

Large manufacturers reduced their prices over 

the quiet Summer, some even lost money, but 

PRICES ARE GOING UP SOON 



CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S 1500 & 3000 CENTRE 



A1 500 NEW VERSION 



All Diamond's 1 500's come with Workbench 2.04 and are 
also supplied with:- Deluxe Paint III. Home Accounts, The 
Works (Word Processor, Spreadsheet and Database). 3 
Games (Puzznlc. Tokl & Elf), and a book (Get The Best Out 
Of Your Amiga). 

A1500onitsown £529 

withGVP 8Mb bare board+52Mb Quantum £819 
with 8Mb 0k RAM board+ 1 05Mb Quantum £978 
A 1500+8833 £729 



A 1500 Deluxe Includes 

1 .3 ROM / 2.04 ROM & Switcher 



£589 



THE NEW COMMODORE AMIGA 3000 

25MHz processor.lOO Mb hard disk. 

4Mb Fast RAM. 2Mb Chip RAM. 

£1995.00 INC VAT 

Phone for PX pricing 



GRAPHICS & VIDEO 

GVP Impact Vision 24 Bit Card 
(1500/2000/3000) from £1550 

DCTV (Pal Version) £440.00 

Rocgen £89.95 

Rocgen + £124.95 

Rendale8802 £119.95 

Rendale 8806 RGB £499.00 

Commodore 2300 Int £499.00 

G2 £575.00 

G2+ £999.00 

Video Riot V330 £999.00 

Philips Editing System £399.00 

Out Of Memory? 

8Mb RAM Board for A1500 or 2000 

Aries Board 0Mb £79.95 

For each 2Mb RAM odd £49.00 

DISK DRIVES 

AMIGA hternd 649.96 

9imiu» £49.95 

Utra dm £64.96 

CDTV drive £64.95 

NEW Roclite Slimline with no click 

& Virus protection on track 0. £69.95 



GVP HARD DRIVES / ACCELERATORS 



AMIGA 1500/200 HARD DRIVE 



Impact Series I 
Impact Series I 
Impact Series I 
Impact Series I 
Impact Series I 



HC8+ Control Carrd only 
HC8+ 8c 52Mb Hard drive 
HC8+ & 120 Mb Hard drive 
HC8+ & 240Mb Hard drive 
HC8+ & 420Mb Hard drive 



AMIGA 1 500 / 2000 ACCELERATOR CARDS 

G-Force 030-25MHz with 1Mb 32-Bit RAM 
G-Force 030-40MHZ with 4Mb 32-Bit RAM 
G-Force 030-50MHz with 4Mb 32-Bit RAM 
G-Force 040-28MHZ with 2Mb 32-Bit RAM 



£134.99 
£279.99 
£419.99 
£639.99 
£1169.99 



£549.99 

£899.99 

£1269.99 

£1699.99 



AMIGA A500 HARD DRIVES 
GVP Series II HD+ 52MB £354.99 

GVP Series II HD+ 105MB £469.99 

GVP Series II HD+ 240MB £734.99 

GVP COMBO ACCELERATOR SERIES 
FOR THE AMIGA A500 
A530 Combo 40Mhz + 52Mb H/D £699.99 
A530 Combo 40Mhz + 120Mb H/D £849.99 
A530 Combo 40Mhz + 200Mb H/D £1039.99 
68882 Co-Processor for A530 £234.99 

GVP MEMORY RAM MODULES 
Series II RAM 8 RAM Card for Amiga 
1500/200 with 2Mb £149.99 

32 bit 60ns 1 Mb SIMM for Accelerator 
Cards £64.99 

32 bit 60ns 4Mb SIMM as above £179.99 



COMPONENT SHOP 
QUANTUM H/DISKS IDE SCSI 

52Mb £149.95 £179.96 

120Mb £269.95 £279.95 

2 year wancnty 

SYQUEST DRIVE 

Removeable cert. 44Mb 28ms £299.00 

CONTROLLER tor above add £49.95 

ROM Switcher Now Available 

1.3 • 2.04 ROM Switcher £9.95 

1 .3 ROM available & £29.96 

2.04 ROM available 9 £39.96 

• PX OH* en page 1. Must be h good 

working condition wlm 1Mb RAM. 
•AjdgerWit or condtlon sutfect to 
monagtit dhCMMM 



CAPTAINS CHIP SHOP 

4X256KDRAMS 

For A590'S etc £3.60 

1X1MB DRAMS For Bup/Supra £3.60 

lxvMbSIMMS 

For NEXUS/GVP/Rochard £34.99 

4x9Mb SIMMS For GVP etc £169.96 

AVIDIO 24 

24-bit graphics for the A500. 768x580 
quality resolution. 16.8m«on colour 
frame buffer. Smc* easy to lit droit 
board. FuBy oenlockabte. Runs on 
standard A50 (1Mb chip RAM). 
With 24-bit pdnt packoge(TV Paint). 
Allows picture in picture £589 

REMBRANDT 

24-bit colour. 1 ©million colons. Fits 
both A 1500/2000 £1490 



CAPTAIN DIAMONDS 

ULTIMATE A600 HARD 

DISK OFFER 
A600 Upgrade Hard Disks 

20Mb (umrledstock) £149.95 
60Mb £199.95 

80Mb £249.95 

120Mb £299.95 

Turn your A600 with a Single 
floppy drive into the ultimate 
machine with a Hard Disk 
12 months return to base 
Only £29.95 for fitting by one 
of our qualified engineers. 



GENERAL ACCESSORIES 



ROC HARD 52Mb 


£349.00 




EMULATORS 






New Commodore 386-20 


£439.99 




The new GVP 16MHz PC-286 


£239.99 




Vortex AT Once Plus 16MHz 


£214.99 




MICE 






Naksha Upgrade Mouse 


£22.95 




New Roboshift. Auto sensing Joystick/Mouse 




switch box 


£13.95 




MEMORY UPGRADES 






A500 Plus 1Mb Expansion 


£39.95 




New A600 1 Mb Expansion 


£54.95 




Supra 500RX 2Mb Expan.(500/500+) 


£139.95 




5 1 2 K RAM Expansion + Clock (500) 


£24.95 




Above without clock 


£19.95 




1 .5Mb Mb Expansion (Not Plus) 


£79.95 




1 Mb Expansion (600) 


£39.95 




1 Mb Expansion with Thru-Port (500) 


£49.95 




INTERNAL DRIVE KIT 






Replacement A500 Internal 3.5" drive kit, fully 




compatablewrth 1 Mb unformatted capac- 




ity. Comes with easy to follow guide 


£49.95 




A500 ROM SWITCHER 






Switching between versions of Kickstart on 




your A500 is could not be-easier than wrth our 




new ROM switcher. 


£9.95 




Kickstart 1 .3 ROM(Suppled seperately) 


£29.95 




Kickstart 2.4 ROM (Supplied seperately) 


£39.95 




TRACKBALL 






One hand control unit, after using 


this you 




will never want a mouse again 


£29.95 




POWER SUPPLY 






Commodore A500 A600 PSU with the switch 




mode 


£39.95 




SOUND EXTRAS 






Amiga Sound Enhancer 


£35.99 




Stereo Speakers 


£39.95 




CONTROL CENTRE 






Turn your Amiga into the ultimate hi-tech 




intergrated workstation environment £34.99 




MONITORS & TVS 






8833Mkll +Turbo Challenge II promotion £199 




CBM 1960 Monitor 


£449.95 




CBM Flicker Fixer 


£299.95 




Panasonic 1381 multisync 


£275 




Philips TV/Monitor 


£249 




Philips 3350 51 ' remote control 


£3499.99 




Philips 86cm matchllne 






100Hz wldescreen 


£2499.99 




New Philips Designer cube TV/Monitor 


£279 




Philips 1 4'SVGA monitor, suitable for use with A3000 




or 1500 with flicker ftxer 


£229.95 




Pleas* add £14.95 for connecting lead 






NEW CDI FROM PHILIPS 


£599 





15. IT TfiDE YOU'&E SELUNC, THIS ' 
|WiTH AN A60D N4D -32FTWACE fOC 

omlv -f-aqq.qs ?i .__ . 

IT CEBTMWLV ©.. *ND ^^JVeXTV 
TWtNlOKJC OF 6UVINC, hWYWHEDE ELSE 

8ur oiAmowd uould 6e cgkzv 

THAT PClC€ I? 



S 



I 



5^1SNT CCf& THE. Fftr^CUS FiLX Slfte 




THE 



?///' — 

f fO-ICE - Pl_EOq£ 

Wfist buying goods from us. you can ihow ui . 
'better price tor the some goods in stock with ' 
-■ of our UK competitors then we w* match »J 

If our prices hove Increased we wi f 
1he price In the odverltsement on ttems In s 
as long as you bring It* advert wrth you. 

This pledge apptes only to customers retytng on il 
ft* advertisement betore the 10th day of the 

month of publcation . It does not oppty to 

competitors prices ottered In dosing down or 

stock clearance saes. 



.#* 



P/X your old 500 

for a new Amiga 1500 

with Workbencch 2.04 

for only £399.95 

ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 




Part exchange ex demo 

A500 with 3 months warranty,"' 

£199.95 

Ex demo A590s from £1 99.95 

ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 



CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S PERIPHERALS PAGE 

Printer Driver Disk for your Amiga, £5.00 (Please specify model) 



APPLICATION 




SOFTWARE 


&DTP 


Graphics & Digitising 




Wordprocessing 


Deluxe Paint IV 


£59.99 


Transwrite 


£29.99 


Digi view Media Station 


£119 


Kindwords 3 


£34.99 


Intro CAD Plus 


£64.99 


Pen Pal 


£44.99 


X CAD 2000 


£89.99 


Wordsworth V 1.1 


£79.95 


X CAD 3000 


£239.99 


Excellence 3 


£79.95 


Image Master 


£106.99 


Home Office Kit 


£49.95 


Image Finder 


£39.95 


Pagesetter 2 


£39.99 


Vista 


£64.99 


Page Stream 2.2 


£129.95 


Pro Vista 


£64.99 


Saxon Publisher 


£159.95 


VDI Amiga Colour Solution 


£99.00 


Propage 3 


£139.95 


Pro Draw 3 


£89.95 










Development & Utilities 


Music, Midi & Sound 




AMOS Starter Pack 


£39.95 


Audio Engineer +2 


£189 


Easy AMOS 


£24.99 


Audiomaster 4 


£44.99 


AMOS 3D 


£29.99 


Bars & Pipes Pro 


£174.99 


AMOS Compiler 


£24.99 


Dr T Copiest Apprentice 
DrTKC5levelllV3.5 


£69.99 


Cross Dos 


£34.99 


£179.95 


Dos 2 Dos 


£24.99 


Music X 1.1 


£44.95 


Disk Master 


£34.99 


Stereo Master 


£29.95 


Dev Pack 3 


£49.95 


Pro Midi 2 Interface 


£19.99 


Directory Opus 
Lattice C 5.1 Dev S 


£24.99 


Techno Sound Turbo 


£34.99 


yst £159.95 






Quater Back V5 


£34.99 


Video Titling 

Amiga Vision 

Big Alternative Scroller 

Broadcast Titler 2 


£49.99 

£39.95 

£174.99 


Superbase Pro 4 
X Copy Pro 5.2 
Hi Speed Pascal 
Hyper Book 


£149.95 
£29.95 
£69.95 
£39.99 


Font Pack 1 for above 


£74.99 






Font Pack 2 for above 


£74.99 


Accounting 




Pro Video Post 


£174.99 


Home Accounts 2 


£34.99 


TV Show 


£49.99 


System 3 


£39.99 


TV Show Pro 


£59.99 


Area Accounts 


£89.99 


TV Text Pro 


£69.95 


Pro Calc 


£99.99 


Video Director 


£99.00 


Advantage 


£34.99 


Can Do VI. 6 


£74.99 


Day By Day 


£24.99 


Show Maker 


£149.00 






Scala 500 


£69.99 


Educational 




Scala Pro 


£175.00 


ADI Maths 11-12 


£19.95 


Animation & Rendering 




A Dl Maths 12-13 
ADI English 11-12 


£19.95 
£19.95 


Art Dept. 


£44.99 


ADI English 12-13 
Distant Suns 4 


£19.95 


Art Dept Pro 2 


£119.95 


£49.95 


Imagine 2 


£174.99 


Fun School s (Each) £19.95 


Map Master for Imagine 


£44.99 


GB Route 


£49.95 


Presentation Master 


£169.95 






Surface Master for Imagine 
Real 3D Beginners 


£24.99 
£84.99 


APPLICATION STAR BUYS 


Real 3D Pro 


£229.95 


Pen Pal 


£44.99 


Sculpt Animate 4D 


£199.95 


Wordworthl.1 


£79.95 






Home Office Kit 


- Includes 


CLUB MEMBERS PRICE ONLY 


Spreadsheet. Database & 


(Prices are already discounted) 


Word Processor 


£49.95 



DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 



STAR LC20 £133.77 

STAR LC 200 £194.94 

STAR LC 24/200 COL £237.77 

STAR XB 24 200 COL £388.92 

STAR XB 24 250 COL £466.47 

CITIZEN 124/D £115.95 

CITIZEN SWIFT 9 £174.95 

CITIZEN SWIFT 9 COL £184.95 

CITIZEN SWIFT 9X £249.95 



CITIZEN SWIFT 224 
CITIZEN SWIFT 224 COL 
CITIZEN SWIFT 24E COL 
CITIZEN SWIFT 24X 
SEIKOSH ASP 1900+ 
SEIKOSHA 24 PIN SL90 
PANASONIC KXP 1123 
NEW PANASONIC 
2180 COLOUR PRINTER 



£204.95 
£22230 
£254.95 
£379.95 
£109.95 
£175117 
£175.07 

■ 



INK JET PRINTERS LASER 



PRINTERS 



HP PAINTJET 
HP DESKJET 
HP DESKJET COL 
STAR SJ48 
CANON BJ10EX 
CANON BJ 20 
CANON BJ300 
CANON BJ330 



£694.95 
£339.58 
£504.08 
£232.65 
£198.58 
£316,08 
£35133 
£499.95 



Oki 400 £52757 

NEWOkiOL410 1Mb 

inc. HP HIP Emulation £703.83 

OKI LASER 810 £1098.62 

OKI LASER 830 

Postscript 2Mb £128427 

OKI LASER 840 

Postscript 2Mb £1491.07 



AMIGA BOOKS 



Advanced S. Prog. Guide £24.45 

3D Graphics Prog. Basic SI 3.95 

Amiga Basic Inside & Out $17.45 

Amiga C Advanced Prog. £24.45 

Amiga C for Beginners £13.95 

Amiga DOS Inside & Out £13.95 

Amiga Dos Quick Ref. £6.95 

Desk Top video Guide £13.95 



Disk Drives Inside & Out £20.95 

Amiga For Beginners SI 2.95 

Graphics Inside & Out £24.45 

Machine Language £13.95 

Printers Inside & Out £24.45 

Systems Prog. Guide £24.45 

Best Tricks & Tips j) 5.95 

Making Music On Amiga cm Af, 



TOP 10 TITLES 

Sensible Soccer £19.49 

Secret Monkey Island II £28.49 

Myth £19.49 

Civilisation £26.24 

Striker £19.49 

Hook (1Mb) £19.49 

Fire & Ice £19.49 

Championship Tennis £18.74 

Lure Of The Temptress £23.24 

Push Over £19.49 

AMIGA BUDGET TITLES 

E-Motion. Dungeon Quest, Shufflepuck Cafe. Tower of Babel. 

Data Storm. Grand Monster Slam, Powerplay. Soccer. Kid Gloves. 

Predator 2. Carv-Up, Corporation, Cadaver, Line of Fire, 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Back to the Future III, Gunship, 

Mike Reads Pop Quiz, Gazza II. Monty Pythons Flying Circus. 

ANY FIYF BUDGFT TIT1 FS FOR ONI Y i?Q OR 85 FACM 



CLUB MEMBER PRICE ONLY 

Why dont you join 

Captain Diamond's 

Discount Club and save a 

fortune on all your games 

Personal callers only 

Normal saving off RRP 

25% 



DIAMOND SHOPS AROUND THE UK 



232 Tottenham CtRd 
London Wl 

FAX 07 1580 4399 

1045 High Road 

Chadwell Heath 

Romford 

Tel 081 597 8851 

FAX 08 1590 8959 

144 Ferry Road 
Edinburgh 
Tel 031 554 3557 
FAX 031 5542115 



443 Gloucester Rd 

Bristol 

Tel 0272 522044 

FAX 0272 521 738 

1022 Stockport Rd 
Manchester 
Tel 061 257 3999 
FAX 061 257 3997 

406 Ashley Road 
Poole Dorset 
Tel 0202 716226 
FAX 0202 716160 



LONDON CORPORATE SALES 

Saran Duffy 071 5804355 Fax 07 1 580 4399 



HEAD OFFICE 

84 Lodge Road 
Southampton 
Tel 0703 232777 
FAX 0703 232 679 

UK CORPORATE 
SALES OFFICE 
TEL 0703 333184 
or 0703 336277 
FAX 0703 232679 
CONTACT SHARON. 
DAWN/BARBARA 
EDUCATION/ 
GOVERNMENT 

14 DAYS ADD 2%. 
30 DAYS ADD 5% 



HOW TO ORDER 

Smply telephone through your order, giving your Access or Visa card 

number, or send a cheaue or postal order to your local shop. 

MAIL ORDER Phone.071 580 4355. Prices include VAT unless otherwise stated 

Minimum Courier Savtce £1 1.75. (Corporate Safes, any order under £250 

subject to £10.00 Admin chardge) Allow 10 working days for cheque 

clearance. Bankers drafts clear same day. All prices are correct at time of 

going to press but are only valid until the 10th day of month of publication 

due to magazines coming out four weeks earlier than issue cover date. 

THE DIAMOND PRICE PLEDGE 

If. whilst buying goods from us. you can show us a better price for the same 
goods in stock with one of our UK competitors then we will match it. 

Even If our prices have Increased we will honour the price in this 
advertisement on items in stock as long as you bring this advert with you. 

This pledge applies only to customers relying on this advertisement before 

the 10th day of the month of publication . It does not apply to competitors 

prices offered in closing down or stock clearance sales. 



MAIL ORDER HOTLINE: PHONE 071 580 4259 



BUSINESS 



No more spanners 

in the works 




E 



High 

performance 

integrated software 

with Micro Systems' 

The Works Platinum 



uropress Software Is rightly 
making a lot of fuss about 
Mini Office Amiga 
(previewed In Amiga 

Shopper 17); it is a great budget 

package for the business on a 

shoestring. All the same, let's not 

forget it was Micro Systems 

Software which 

brought the first 

true integrated 

package to the 

Amiga In the form 

of the Works. 

Version 1.5 is 

reviewed here, 

although it 

premiered way 

back in 1991, 

making it 

quite ancient 

by today's 

standards. 

Nevertheless, careful 

programming has stood the test of 

time and The Works, performs on the 

latest A500 Plus machine just as 

well as It worked on the original. 

INSTALLATION 

Installing The Works is a breeze. 
Considering this system's age, it still 
puts many others to shame with its 
clear simplicity and precise verbosity. 
Beginners can let the install process 
do it all for them, experts override one 
or more settings at the click of a 
mouse. Once up, The Works comes 
with four main modules - 
spreadsheet, word processor, 
database and communications - plus 
some supplementary utilities: 
Sideways (sideways spreadsheet 



printing), Spellmate 
(supplementary 
dictionary editor) and 
DbMerge (concatenate 
databases). 

All are available 
from a simple, 
uncluttered menu- 
based front end: 
although opening a file type 
opens the correct module. Clinching 
proof that The Works was designed as 
a completely integrated system is the 
fact that each module has a separate 
menu item to activate the host 
module. 

Memory permitting, {The Works 
requires a frugal 512K, thanks to 
intelligent use of a shared library) it is 
possible to launch two or more of the 
modules and multitask them - 
switching between each one simply by 
arranging the screens. 

A useful feature, especially for 
beginners, is that it is not possible to 
accidentally launch, start, more than 
one copy of the program at once - 
although each can have more than 
one window open. Several 




The 

Works' word 

processor module, Scribble, is ideal 

for bashing out lots of text 

other mainstream applications spring 
to mind that could benefit from the 
addition of this simple, but very user- 
friendly feature. 

WORD PROCESSOR 

Scribble users will recognise this one 
straightaway because that's basically 
what it is. 

Scribble has always been a word 
processor and. like Arnor's Protext, 
does not pretend to be anything else. 
So if you want a text and graphics 
WYSIWYG display, this one is not for 



The Works Platinum is often 
mentioned in passing, rarely 
discussed in detail - Mark Smiddy 
examines the main competitor to 
Mini Office Amiga 

BEGINNERS 
TART HERE 




What Is an 
integrated 
package? 




Many suppliers would have you 
believing that an integrated 
package is no more than a bundle 
of old titles re-named and bundled 
together in the same box. This is 
not the case: a truly integrated 
package should be run from a 
common interface and have a 
"look and feel" common to all the 
modules. Also, any one module 
should be able to exchange data 
easily with any other - and the 
emphasis there is on easily 1 . In 
practical terms every possible 
combination is not always viable 
or even useful. For instance it 
would be unusual to need to send 
data from a spreadsheet directly 
to the communications system. 

How can I tell a package Is 
Integrated and not Just a bundle? 

In most circumstances, you can't. 
The best way is to read the 
reviews or ask someone who 
knows. A typical example of a 
bundle is Gold Disk's Office - and 
while there's nothing wrong with 
it, Office cannot claim to be truly 
Integrated. Just for the record, it 
contains a neat little word 
processor, mediocre flat-file 
database, simple desktop 
publisher and a first rate 
spreadsheet. 

What Is the advantage of an 
integrated system over a bundled 
one? 

Mainly the common interface. 
This helps you get to grips with 
each module faster because once 



you master one, 
you will be well 
on the way to 
mastering the others. In business 
anything that makes things easier 
has got to be a good thing. 

So are there any disadvantages 
then? 

As we say in Amiga Shopper, "yet 
gets what yer pays for." Face it, 
no-one buys a Skoda Estelle and 
expects It to go like a Porsche 
944. More or less the same 
situation applies to integrated 
software like Mini Office and The 
Works. 

With the budget package, you 
can expect to get reasonable 
performance but possibly a high 
level of inter-module self-reliant 
integration. (That's just a fancy 
way of saying, how well the 
modules exchange data with 
other systems). The higher priced 
system will be much less reliant 
on data from itself and more 
relaxed about the formats it can 
read. 

Bundled software can be 
something of a mixed bag in this 
respect. For instance, some 
modules might be able to read 
and write ASCII data while others 
only accept their own formats. 
There is nothing wrong with this, 
but it can limit the usefulness of 
some modules or just make them 
harder to use. 

On the upside, getting a 
bundle may be a good way of 
obtaining something you badly 
need with some supplementary 
software you can use if the need 
arises. The strength of Gold 
Disk's Office bundle is the 
Advantage spreadsheet. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



13' 



BUSINESS 



you. (MSS produces Excellence! 
which does that job). As a word 
processing engine for bashing out 
lots of text it's ideal - and simple IFF 




The Scribble spell checker comes 
adrift when It attempts to guess 
what It was you meant to type... 

graphics can be inserted at print 
time. 

One particular drawback is that 
the size of any document is limited 
by the available memory and Scribble 
does not offer any facility to 
automatically link multiple 
documents; this should not pose any 
major problems for most users 
though. The Mini Office word 
processor has a simpler, more 
graphical front end but Scribble is 
faster in general and the spelling and 
thesaurus sections are better. 

The 80,000 word spelling 
checker is based on a Collins UK 
English dictionary. It is, however, 
less than good at guessing what you 
meant to say. In comparison, the 
thesaurus is in a different league, 
not only does it give the 
synonyms for a word, but also the 
type of word: noun, adjective, 
adverb and so on - as defined by 
the headword. 

One thing which is worth 
mentioning is the slightly eccentric 
way in which Scribble performs cut 
and paste (editing) operations. Most 
word processors use a drag 
selection procedure - in which you 
hold the left mouse button and move 
the mouse over a rectangular area of 
text. Scribble works in much the 
same way only each operation - cut, 
paste, copy - activates a special 
mode, shown by the mouse pointer. 
This will be a little alien for experts 
who will more likely be used to 
selecting text first, then the 
operation. In practice though, 
Scribble's method is simple and 
perfectly usable; dare I say better? 

DATABASE 

The database module was also sold 
separately under the Organise! 
banner. Although a relatively simple 
flat-file affair, MSS claims it will 
handle up to 128 fields with 4.2 
billion records - and it's file 
compatible with AshtonTate's multi- 
cloned DBase ///. 

Four field types are supported: 



text, numeric, date and logical. Text 
fields can be up to 254 characters 
wide and numeric ones support 16 
digits including the decimal point. 
Numeric fields 
support basic 
calculations including 
exponentiation and 
parenthesis; and 
another field name 
can be used as a 
variable (like the 
spreadsheet). 
Enthusiasts can use 
many of the 
spreadsheet functions 
within fields too. 
Reporting 
facilities are more basic than power 
databases such as Superbase 
Personal 2, but quite adequate for 
most users. Similarly, the mail-merge 
is simple but does the job. Frankly, 
few people need more power or 
features than this - and those who 
do should buy a custom package 
such as Superbase Professional. 
Among flat-file databases though, 
this one is a real star. 

SPREADSHEET 

The shining star in The Works is its 
spreadsheet, also known in another 
guise as Analyse!. 

Users familiar with systems such 
as Lotus 1-2-3 and As-Easy-As on the 
PC will feel instantly at home 
with the menu and 
"slash" 




Above: the database module is a 
breeze to get to grips with 

Below: the spreadsheet module. 
Data can be cut and pasted from 
other modules for graphics 

command interface. In fact, Analyse 
will read and write the dated, but 
widely used, WKS format developed 
by Lotus for its spreadsheets. This 
takes it at least one step ahead of 
its closest competitor Mini Office 



which doesn't recognise the WKS 
format. Just 40 functions put it well 
behind major spreadsheets, but the 
most useful ones are included - 
besides, enterprising users can soon 
construct their own. 

The spreadsheet module 
incorporates the graphics facilities - 
which as you may remember are a 
separate entity in Mini Office. This 
might seem limiting, but data can be 
cut from another module and pasted 
directly into the spreadsheet for 
graphics. This approach is more 
conventional than the stance taken 
by Mini Office, and works very well on 
other systems such as the 
Macintosh. There is no overall 
advantage to either method, they are 
merely different sides of the same 
coin. 

What makes the spreadsheet so 
powerful is its extensive macro 
language. In essence, any slash 
command that can be entered at the 
keyboard can be programmed as a 
macro call. A special macro (/O) is 
automatically executed as the sheet 
is opened making it useful for 
presentations and rolling 
demonstrations. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

The telecommunications module is in 
a class of its own - not least 
because it offers speeds from 
300 to a claimed maximum of 
57,600 baud! Generally 
speaking the Amiga's 
hardware is only good up to 
19,200 and it gets a bit 
gribbly at those speeds 
unless you use hardware 
handshaking. (See our 
regular comms column by 
Phil Harris for more 
information). 
So much for the blurb 
on the box. Anyone can claim 
speeds few people will ever use - 
but the Comms module is 
no toy. It offers a 40 
number dialling directory, 
programmable macro keys 
(20 per number) plus all 
the common transfer 
protocols: X, Y, WX and 
ZModem plus CompuServe 
B, Kermit and SADIE™ - 
MSS's proprietary 
transfer protocol. ZModem 
is an essential if you use 
any serious BBS like CIX for 
instance. Emulations include 
8-colour ANSI. VT52, 100, 102 
and Tektronics 4010 - but does 
anyone still need some of these, I 
wonder? 

A full macro (scripting) language 
is included so you can automate long 
log-on sequences. The package can 
even be programmed to log you on to 
a remote system, download all your 
mail, messages and so on and log 
you off. A special delay function can 



be used to time the logon to activate 
at some specific time - while you are 
out, away on holiday or even asleep; 
dates are not supported though. 

CONCLUSION 

The Works has been around for quite 
some time now - but it still makes a 
very fair showing against even recent 
competition. Overall the modules are 
slicker than Mini Office and generally 
offer more and better features; this 
is, of course, reflected by the higher 
price. 

Insofar as the front-end is 
concerned, The Works looks rather 
dated but this should not be seen as 
a disadvantage - it is still clean, 
clear and it does the job. Many users 
will probably prefer this approach to 
the more flowery, 3D bas-relief in 
vogue at the moment. Although less 
attractive, the spartan look is faster 
to draw - and that means the 
programs can perform better. In 
summing up, I can only say, love it or 
hate it, Trie Works is a classic which 
simply cannot be passed over as 
being past its sell-by date. Mini 
Office is pretty and cheap, The Works 
is more powerful and means 
business - let battle commence. C0 

OOOOCXXJOO 
SHOPPING LIST 

The Works Platinum £79.95 

by Micro Systems Software 
12798 Forest Hill Blvd 
Suite 202 
West Palm Beach 
Florida 333414 
* 01 0407 790 0770 

Available from: 

HB Marketing 

Unit3,Poylel4 

Newlands Drive 

Colnbrook 

Slough, Berks 

SL3 ODX 

o 0753 686000 




CHECKOUT 

The Works Platinum 



Ease of Use • • • • O 

The spreadsheet module, like most, is 
heavy going at first. 

Interface • • • O O 

Looks very dated, but it works well. 

Documentation • 9 9 9 

Brilliant and plenty of it - installation even 
details popular hard disks. Not quite up to 
date with the program though. 

Price Value • • • • O 

Extra features make it worth the extra 20 
quid over Mini Office if you can afford it. 



Overall rating 



Quite superb - a true Amiga classic. 



40 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



gj Vp#| 



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How to take advantage of this exceptional offer: simply send or hand 
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* If you require 24 hour courier to your door, please add IS else your 
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BUSINESS 




Is LPCalc really the future of spreadsheets and databases? 




Solid Gold Software makes some 
bold claims for LPCalc - Mark 
Smiddy asks whether it really is a 
universal business panacea 



The blurb on the back of the 
packaging grandly 
proclaims that LPCalc is: 
"Beyond spreadsheets! 
Beyond databases! The next 
generation of productivity 
software..." Typical applications 
listed for LPCalc include: production 
scheduling; portfolio selection; 
hospital diets and even tactical 
planning. For those into "buzz" it 
sounds like the final solution - 
certainly such phraseology Is 
guaranteed to bore the pants off 
Interesting guests at parties - but 
what does it all mean? 

LPCalc is a linear programming 
calculator. A what? I'd never heard of 
such a thing either - and considering 
most of my computer literate 
colleagues also shrugged shoulders, 
I decided LPCalc had to be worth 
closer investigation. To quote the 
manual, "There is no more powerful 
programming tool available on any 
machine at any price". Oh dear, 
sounds as if someone has been free 
basing hype. 

LPCALC ON TEST 

Shaken but undeterred, I booted the 
package which promptly crashed the 
machine. Solid Gold says LPCalc 
requires 1Mb (it even comes with a 
special A3000 version), but, try as I 
might, only the 512K version worked 
on my 3Mb A500 Plus. Now then, 
where is that "friendly graphical user 
interface" mentioned in the manual? 



Come to that, where are the menus? 
There aren't any! Let's get down to 
some basics: LPCalc does not have 
any menus and the nearest thing it 
has is a list of one letter commands. 
It does not understand the mouse - 
and although the ^^^^^^^^^ 
cursor keys work 
some of the time, 
"Enter" on the 
numeric keypad 
does not. 

If Solid Gold 
defines this sort of 
front end as friendly 
I would hate to be 
on its Christmas 
card list. 



"Masochists with a 

penchant for linear 

programming will 

enjoy this..." 



CALCULATION 

So what is this linear programming 
stuff all about? Well the idea is to 
define a problem as a set of 
constraints (limits if you like) and 
their control plus the variables the 
decision will be based upon. LPCalc 
then uses these to work out a 
solution for the problem using a 
linear algorithm. 

Instantly you can see the 
problem: business people want a 
computer to do all the work - that, 
after all, is what they are there for. 
However, although linear 
programming does require a lot more 
thought than a spreadsheet it can 
solve some interesting problems 
once they have been defined. 

It's no accident that LPCalc looks 



like a spreadsheet - it was designed 
that way. Theoretically that should 
make it a lot easier to use - but that 
is only part of the problem. LPCalc 
does not understand even basic 
point-and-click methods, so the 
spreadsheet-like look and feel boils 
down to something horribly 
reminiscent of an ancient PC 
application. 

CALCULATING DECISION 

A simple example in the manual 
quotes a tailor who is making suits in 
three different sizes, and gowns in 
two others. Each garment makes a 
specific requirement on materials. 
For instance: a medium sized suit 
requires one square yard of silk, one 
of wool and three of cotton. These 
values (and the amount of each in 
storage) form the constraints. 

The decision variables are the 
types of clothing - there's five in this 
example - and each one determines 
a set of three constraints. The types 
of constraints are set up as: 
limitation (<=): exact requirement (=); 
and equal to or greater than (=>). 
Variables in the RHS (right hand side) 
column set the limits for those. 

COST ANALYSIS 

The objective coefficient in this 
problem is defined as the cost of 
each garment and appears below 
each type in the OBJ row. The final 
objective appears below the 
constraints in the CONST column and 
is the maximum number of garments 
to create in order to get the most 
profit from the current inventory. 

Enough of that, see 
the screenshot for a 
complete example. 
The calculation 
is completed in under 
a second - and a few 
button pushes later, 
you can examine the 
results, but the units 
have to be defined 
separately (a 
tediously slow job) so 
they are meaningless at this stage. 
Once done though, LPCalc does 
some of the work defining the units- 
per-whatever. For this example, 
materials can be examined in 
pounds-per-square yard. More 
interestingly, it will also provide 
further information. The best profit 
available from this data set is £330 
by making two small suits, three 
large suits and three small gowns. It 
can even provide the break-even 
prices for the individual materials, 
how much will be left over and so on. 
What use is all this information? 
Quite a lot if you have the slightest 
idea of how to define and use linear 
equations - non-whatsoever if you 
don't. 

Solid Gold has missed a golden 
opportunity here by assuming the 



whole world knows everything there 
is to know about linear programming. 
The truth is, most people do not. A 
detailed description of the theory 
behind linear programming - written 
in plain English - and a 
comprehensive glossary of terms 
must be added to the manual. Also, 
the shocking front end needs major 
improvements. 

CONCLUSION 

LPCalc is without doubt one of the 
worst programs I have ever seen on 
the Amiga. If it were an ancient PD or 
shareware release I could have some 
sympathy, but people are being 
charged money for what amounts to 
a relatively recent program. I cannot 
claim to be so much as a neophyte 
at linear programming, but despite 
experience programming real 
applications in languages such as C, 
ARexx, several versions of BASIC and 
assembly code I could not get my 
teeth into LPCalc. 

Masochists with a penchant for 
linear programming will enjoy this, 
everyone else should leave it well 
alone. Think of the current 
incarnation as "work in progress" 
because with a much better manual 
and greatly improved front end to 
complement the impressive linear 
programming engine, LPCalc could be 
incredibly useful. #T ^ 

oooooooool 

SHOPPING LIST 

LPCak £49.70 

by Solid Gold Software 
1 16 Parway Drive 
Arlington Park 
Huntingdon, WVa 25705 

Distributed in UK by: 

HB Marketing, Unit 3, 
Poyle 14, Newlands Drive, 
Colnbrook, Slough, 
Berks SL30DX 
* 0753 686000 




CHECKOUT 
LPCalc 



Speed • • • • O 

Very fast at what it does. 

Interface • O O O O 

Appaling to look at and very difficult to 
use. 

Documentation • O O O O 
Poor layout and far too "clever' for its own 
good. 

Price Value • • • O O 

Cheap enough if you have a use for it. 

Overall rating toooo 

Useless, unless you already know how to 
use it. 



I A9. AM,GA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 9 • NOVEMBER 1 992 




Don't send away for it WAIT! 

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091 -51 3939 Millfie,d > Sunderland, Tyne & Wear 



f^NTS^ 



The Secretary of Education. 
U.K., Feb. 1992, recommends: 
Old-fashioned methods of 
teaching ... challenge the pupil. 



School Principal: Sac* to Basics 
has more substance than many 
available ... Excellent for 
teaching hard skills. 

AmlgaWorld, August, 1990: If you 
want to learn these skills then this 
is the software for you! 



NATIONAL CURRICULUM 

Compatible 
LEVELS 1-4 



Help is at hand with Maths 
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Back to Basics 

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(English. American S Australasian versions available) 

^f- Fractions! 

Xr Step-by-Step instruction in: 
SIMPLIFYING* ADDING 
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of Fractions. 



S 



Word Construction Set 

Students are given clues by sentences, speech 
and graphics, to build over 1000 words using 
phonetic "chunks". Consonant and Vowel patterns. 
Plus! Word Endings, Prefixes, Greek and Latin Bases. 
Great fun in creating new words. 



A must for vocabulary building and spelling. 



U.K. & AUSTRALASIA 
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FAX: 010-646-876 8888 

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EDUCATION 



Have you been sending in examples of your work? Wilf Rees looks 
over your offerings - and tries out Art Tutor from Castlesoft 

OWC WORK 
WORK WORK WORK WO 



3D 



Please wait, the Animations will load shortly 



This is Mark Evan's loader screen which looks 
great through the 3D glasses he provided 



The time has come to collect 
together some of the 
various pieces of work I 
have been sent and show 
you all how well the Amiga Is being 
used to develop ideas and solutions 
to educational tasks. 

Please don't feel upset if your 
own offering isn't among the 
examples used this month. I have 
lots to work from, and It may well 
emerge in the future. Do remember, 



we are looking to publish 
examples of good working 
practice using an Amiga. If 
you have produced 
something that you are 
pleased with, discovered a 
short-cut to achieve a 
special effect, 
or carried out an 
assignment at school - 
send it to me at Amiga 
Shopper. If we like it, you 
get international coverage 
in the best Amiga mag, not 
to mention the chance of 
something nice arriving by 
post. So, keep sending 'em 
in and don't be shy. 

I particularly liked the way some 
people really had a go at the 3D 
article I wrote, and we received some 
super examples. Of all the work I 
received on this, there is one 
particular collection of animations I 
felt captured the whole principle very 
well, and I have decided to give this 
pride of place. Mark Evans from 
down there in Neath has obviously 
spent hours glued to his Amiga (and 



MAKING A LIGHTBOX ON DPAINT III 


Keith Brogan from Livingston, 


9 Draw a rectangle in a different 


West Lothian, sent me this great 


colour over image on frame 2 


tip for creating a lightbox in 


10 Free Stencil and fix background 


DPaint III - a feature previously 


11 Using colour from frame image 


only available to DPaint IV users. 


1, draw changes on frame 2 


He uses the animation feature, 


12 Free background and call up 


linked to the brush and grid... 


stencil requester 




13 Select background colour and 


1 Create a number of animation 


colour used for frame 1 


frames (number dependant on 


14 Select filled rectangle tool 


application) 


15 Draw over image on frame 2 


2 Draw an image on frame 1 (do a 


holding down right mouse button 


squiggle for practice) 


16 Free Stencil 


3 Turn on 'grid' (press 'G') 




4 Pick up image as brush with left 


This process should give you two 


mouse button. 


different images on frame 1 and 2 


5 Position brush exactly over 


All you have to do is repeat the 


image on screen 


process for successive frames. 


6 Go to frame 2 (press 2). Stamp 


Keith admits that this might 


on brush (check alignment by 


seem a little tedious at first, but 


pressing 1,2) 


adroit use of keyboard short-cuts, 


7 Bring up stencil requester 


and familiarity with the method 


(shift+tilde) click on background 


greatly speeds up the process. A 


colour- OK 


really useful routine, Keith, prezzie 


8 Turn the grid off 


on its way! 



has read the article 
carefully), because his 
results were very good. Not 
only were the animations 
well constructed, but the 
whole disk was put 
together with a great deal 
of thought. It had a header 
page which also animated 
in 3D: the Commodore 
logo spins on a horizontal 
axis, while the digits 
'500' turn on their vertical 
axes. 




BLOOD AND 
THUNDER 

The graphic design in one of Mark's 
pieces looks like the ideal back cover 
for a record sleeve, and the 
animation going on around the 
graphics bears the usual blood, 
thunder and spookiness we all know 
and love. The smoke billowing out 
from the main character is as nice an 
effect as I have seen, and the 
distance effect from offset tints 
works well. I also liked the loader 
screen which was a 3D still, showing 
a pair of glasses (see above left). 

TUNNEL VISION 

The best and most effective piece of 
3D work however, was an animation 
on Marks' disk called Tunnel. 

This really did make your eyes 
seem to be drawn down a rotating, 
shifting tunnel, and the amount of 
illusionary depth created on the 
monitor screen was truly amazing! A 
well presented and carefully 
constructed piece of work, Mark, well 
done! A special goodie is on its way 
courtesy of Commodore UK. 

Mark also pointed out that he 



Mark's Commodore logo spins on a horizontal 
axis while the '500' spins on the vertical axis 



found the 3D effect varied according 
to the ambient lighting, as well as 
the levels of brightness and contrast 
on his monitor. So, if you're still 
struggling with the effect, try fiddling 
with the knobs on the monitor, it 
might suddenly come good. 

AMIGAS IN ACTION 

What a real pleasure it was for me to 
receive a disk from David Parks who 
teaches Art & Design at Woodhouse 
High School in Tamworth. 

Obviously the old Amigas are 
being given some hammer both in 
lessons and in the Computer 
Graphics club held after school. 
David's disk contained loads of work 
from students at the school, mostly 
in year nine (aged between 13 and 
14). The students put together 
collections of their work from the 
school, together with educational PD 
programs from the open market, and 
sell the disks at £1 each. Along with 
the disks came some useful pointers 
from David. 

Again in connection with DPaint 




Mark Allen uses a nice colour 
cycling routine to get this effect 



For the benefit of those with black 
and white TVs, the yellow is behind 
the pink - thank you, Dean Cobb 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 




A&cteimr 




where quality 

counts.»and adds 

...and spells and 

reads and draws... 



"Children love learning when it's fun and 
entertaining, that's why Kids' Academy 
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educational software and cartoonists 
animate the antics of the characters. You 
can be confident your child is learning 
with the best." 
Trude Salisbury - 
Designer and Publisher. 

See inside Kids' Academy 
for details of the £25,000 
worth of educational 
software which must be won. 



#Ss 



Alvin's Puzzles 6-8 years 

Two great games to teach and reinforce spelling 
and reading and to decipher picture clues to 
make picture cartoons. 

Paint Pot 2 4-10 years 

Painting has never been such fun. Friendly 
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Two games. Practical maths and logic skills. 
Learn to count, add and subtract in a 
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Which? Where? What? 

4-6 years 

Three enchanting and wacky games. Children 
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Kids' Academy comes to you from the 
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Visit your local computer software retailer, or fil 
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Please send me details about the Kids' Academy collection of educational software 
(or 4-10 yeor olds. 

Name (Mr/Ms/Mrs/Miss) 

Address 



Postcode Tel 

Post to: Kids' Academy, Prisma Software, P.O. Box 21 1, Chester. CHI 3NJ 
Telephone: 0244 326244 Facsimile: 0244 321 237 




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Addition 
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Above: another example 
of Mark Evan's work - 
and the smoke effect 
works well 

Top right: Nell Cooper 
provides a nice animation 
of a well-known lager 
advertisement 
Right: David Perks has 
drawn these wine 
glasses, then converted 
them into scaled 
animations pivoting on 
the horizontal axis 



/// and DPaint IV - to avoid the 
problem of having to wait while the 
computer prints out your work, use 
your Amiga's multi-tasking 
capabilities and load DPaint twice, 
working on one DPaint document 
while the other is printing. Obviously 
with DPaint /Vthis is not possible 
because the program takes up too 
much memory. However, a utility in 





Having taught Art & Design for 
more years than I care to 
remember, I was Interested to see 
how Castlesoft approached the 
subject. 

Art Tutor requires Workbench to 
be loaded first. The program disk is 
essentially divided into 2 sections: 
Art Tutor 1, and Art Tutor 2. I'm not 
really sure of the logic in dividing the 
package up into two sections, it 
really was annoying having to quit 
one section, then reload another, 
when moving between the various 
elements would have been much 
preferable. I strongly suspect this 
may be due to the program being 
ported from the ST, as the manual 
missed out on some of the porting, 
and refers to Atari art packages. The 
subdivisions of art categories are 
fairly comprehensive, covering such 
aspects as design, cartoons, 
perspective, landscape, colour, 
head & face and so on - 11 topics 
in all. 



the public domain called PPsAiowwill 
permit this. It is executed by using 
the 'P' key, and can be pulled down 
to continue working on DPaint IV. The 
program is also small enough to be 
fitted on to the DPaint IV disk. 

WOODHOUSE SCHOOL 

There were four animations on the 
Woodhouse disk, all of which 




^~W **■ <+> 



t) 



WHY NOT SAVE TOIS PICTURE TO DISC ? 



save ] [i.evei.1 | [< ] [menu] | > | | Tie:;] 



Cut & Paste: these are really nasty 
digitised facial features and not a 
patch on the DPaint version 

Common to each of the two 
tutorials is a fairly rudimentary art 
drawing package, referred to as 
'Level One'. This offers the usual 
menu driven tool facilities for 
geometric and free line drawing, 
along with a simple sprite designer. 
Each of the categories goes through 
an example to explain the principle 
or method advised to follow. Some 
of these are visually well-handled, 
and make full use of the Amiga's 
abilities. I did find that there was 
often rather a large leap from the 
early developmental stages of a 
topic, to a suddenly completed 
image, with no advice given as to 
the method adopted. All of the basic 
principles any drawing and painting 
teacher handles are present, and in 



deserve 

commendation. I 
particularly liked 
David Perks' 
animated wine 
glasses which 
rotated around the 
horizontal axis. 
Sorry to change 
the colours slightly 
David, but in order 
to display the 
frame grab at its 
best, I needed to 
alter it for printing 
in black and white. 

Meanwhile Neil 
Cooper produced 
a lager lout advert 
for a well known 
swill, which has a 
nice cartoon 
quality, and ran 
smoothly: Dean 
Cobb gave us the 
Jimmy White 
treatment with a 
nifty snooker 
animation, and 
Mark Allen tackled the Terminator 2 
scene with a crisp colour cycling 
routine. Well done boys, but where 
are the girls?! 

EXTENDING THE 
INTEGREX 

Woodhouse High School also has 
Integrex 132 colour printers, which I 
have referred to previously, and 

some cases, done rather well. But 
my real reservation is that this 
package is 'canned art'. 

Working and using computers 
continually for not only Art & Design, 
but many other disciplines, I am 
only too aware of their capabilities 
and limitations. The manual in this 
package attempts to extend the 
learning experience beyond the 
limits of the package itself, and 
recommends further exercises. 
Commendable enough, but there is 
no substitute for developing visual 
literacy to replace observed drawing, 
and while I accept there will be 
areas of understanding enhanced by 
the acquisition of this package, it 
addresses only those skills 
associated with 'effective' learning 



h 


-.''I .'MIC 'J»P 

flkMI 


* 


P 


■ 


1. 


■ 







Anti-aliasing, smoothing and 
blending are all possible with Art 
Tutor, but so what? Sadly it's all 
been done much better elsewhere 



David Parks suggests two further 
applications possible with the 
Integrex. The first involves taping thin 
cotton to a piece of A4 paper, and 
passing this through the machine, 
thus transferring the image on to 
fabric. I know from my own 
experience that this does work, but 
caution is due, because when I 
spoke to Integrex about this some 
four years ago, it strongly advised 
against it because of possible 
damage to the ink-Jet head. This 
does seem ironic, as Integrex 
recently announced fabric ink 
cartridges for the Integrex, albeit, for 
printing on to paper, then transferring 
to fabric by hot iron. 

OFFSET PRINTING? 

David's other suggestion, which is 
new to me, involves printing on to 
silver paper or aluminium foil. The 
image can then be transferred to 
another surface by a process similar 
to offset printing. This enables the 
transfer of images on to surfaces 
which could not normally go through 
the Integrex. 

Incidentally, while on the subject 
of Integrex printers, a new range is 
due out very soon, and the new 
Bubble-jet (called the Beta-jet and 
which just happens to be sitting in 
front of me), is a superb piece of kit, 
at a very competitive price, which 
produces almost laser quality 
printing. Keep watching this space 
for the first ever review... n-1 



H»-Sis« | | Te 



Ur»l*>' a x-KAv 

Bold O ■ u 

Italioa v*rt □ 

200H I^TT H.tli oTm; 

SIZE £3 I I 




The drawing package which 
supports Art Tutor. Rudimentary 
and certainly not one I'd like my 
students to develop their skills on 

at the cost of 'affective' and 
appreciative understanding. Art 
Tutor has too much of a feel of 
those partwork magazines, which 
build up to make one an 'expert' in 
a particular field. I suppose it might 
serve to improve the skills of 
someone who lacked any art 
education, but I have to say that, as 
a practising teacher, I wouldn't have 
it near my classroom. 

ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 



Art Tutor £29.00 



Available from: 
Castlesoft 
n 0333 21 243 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



u 



READER ADS 



Shopper Reader Ads 

... Or flow you can reach 50,000 fellow Amiga owners for only a fiver 



WANTED 



Swap your Amiga PD disks 
for mine. Over 1000 disks 
to choose from, all virus 
free. Send your PD list to 
Harry Hutchinson, 53 
Cumberland Rd, Lough- 
borough, Leics LEU ODE 



FOR SALE 



Laser quality prints, send 
disks with SAE stating 
details of picture to 
P Garrett, Chestnut Cottage, 
White Lion Road, 
Amersham, Bucks HP7 9JR. 
One print £1.50, four prints 
£3! 

A1500+ ECS. ROM sharer, 
Nexus SCSI card plus 4Mb 
and 5 port MIDI interface 
fitted internally. Also track 
ball mouse (never used) and 
two joysticks plus all 
manuals. £600 ono. For 
details contact Alan ** 0474 
832861 



Amiga 2000 GVPII 52Mb, 
5Mb RAM, Kickstart 2.04, 
Philips CM8833 monitor, 
four joysticks, loads of 
games, DPaint IV, Aegis 
sound sampler, lots of PD, 
software £1000 ono -a 081 
946 3256 Ask for Mr Clarke 

Accelerator accelerator 

accelerator SSL A5000 plus. 
20MHz 68020, 1Mb Fast 
32-bit DRAM. A500 and 
A2000 compatible. £250 
ono. £320 with 68882 
25MHz co-processor. 
■b Chris 0203 713690 

Amiga 2000 system. Only 7 
months old. This is a full set 
up and too big to list. Will 
not split. Cost £6000, sell 
£3200. ■b Gazza on 
Rochdale 0706 44858 

Amiga software - Birds of 
Prey £30, World Class 
Rugby (unused), Devpac 1, 
Power Basic £25 each 
(boxed). Lemmings, Double 



Dragon II, Alcatraz, F16 
combat pilot £10 each, o 
Ken on Leeds 0532 698432 

Amiga 68010 processor 
(10MHz) 30% - 50% more 
power than 68000. 
Compatible with all 
hardware/serious software. 
Plus most games. £37.50. 
For details send disk/stamp 
to S Barr, 16 Ogilvie Road, 
Stirling, Scotland FK8 2HJ 

Amiga A590 hard disk drive 
as new in box with mains 
and software. £180 ono. 
Amiga 2000 « meg twin 
floppy 40meg hard disk 
A2091 and 10845 £800. 
« 0942 819786 Ask for 
Paul Kelly 

Dr T 'Copyist DTP' music 
notation software. Latest 
version. Full MIDI 
transcription facilities. Ideal 
for KCS etc. Epson, deskjet, 
postscript drivers. Zone 
registered. Cost £230, 



accept £150 • 
842 469 



Robin 0453 



Superpic real time colour 
digitiser and genlock. C/W 
PSU manual. £300 ono. 
Cost £500 new o M Bowles 
040377 545 West Sussex 

CSA Mega Midget racer 33 
MHz accelerator card for the 
Amiga 2000/1500. 512K 
SRAM, 2Mb DRAM. £490 
ono. A2320 display en- 
hancer board £175 ono. » A 
Martin 081 863 1386 eves 

Amiga A500 with 2Mb Fast 
RAM, second drive, soft- 
ware, 4.5A PSU, Macll 
cartridge £300 ono. 640K 
Hercules display PC - offers 
up to £150. Will consider 
splitting or swaps. « Gary on 
Crawley 0293 520199 

Megachip 2Mb of Chip 
RAM. Brand new, in box. 
Unregistered, fits in A500/ 
1500/2000. Upgrade forces 



It's only £5 to sell your used hardware and software in Amiga Shopper 



Sell your excess hardware and software with Amiga Shopper Reader 
Adverts. Just All in the form and send it to us along with a cheque 
(made payable to Future Publishing) or postal order for £5. But BE 
WARNED. This magazine is not a forum for selling pirate software or 
other illegal goods. Software must include all issue disks, manuals and 



a signed statement that all other copies have been destroyed. Please 
advise us if you are offered pirate or copied software by advertisers. All 
ads are accepted in good faith. The editor reserves the right to refuse 
or amend ads. We accept no responsibility for typographical errors or 
losses arising from the use of this service. 



Trade ads will not be accepted, including anyone advertising the sale of PD software. 



, 1 

Name issue 19 



Address (not for publication) 



Postcode 
Date 



Tel. 



Tick one box to 
show required 
section heading 

For sale J 

Wanted □ 

Personal... J 

Fanzines ...J 



Use one space for each word. Only the words in this section will be printed. 































































Return with your 

cheque to: 

Reader Ads, 

Amiga Shopper, 

30 Monmouth 

Street, 

Bath, 

Avon BA1 2BW 



Unfortunately we cannot guarantee insertion in a particular issue. 

I have read and understood the conditions for the inclusion of my ad. 

Signature 



sale. £110 A500 Plus. 1Mb 
chip upgrade £25. Cheap? 
» Chris 0703 431168 

Amiga 68010 processor 
10MHz 30 - 50% more power 
than 68000. Compatible 
with all serious hardware/ 
software. Plus most games 
£37.50. Details send stamp. 
S Barr. 16 Ogilvie Road, 
Stirling, Scotland FK8 2HJ 

Citizen 224 with colour kit 
fitted. 4 months old, 2000 
continuous paper £200. 
DPaint III £20, Platinum 
Works £30. all with manuals 
and original disks, *» Keith 
Sargent 081 472 1403 

XT brldgeboard with 51/4" 
drive, software and manuals 
for A1500, A2000. £130. 
Installed if local to Newport. 
* Mike 0633 875034 eves 

82Mb autobooting HD with 
Spirit controller card for 
A1500/2000, £220 ono. 
Also Microbotics 8-up RAM 
expansion board populated 
to 2Mb, £100. » Paul/Brian 
0634 848261 after 7pm 

A1500 Quantum 40Mb HD, 
4Mb RAM, GVP 68030 
Combo, Philips 8833/2 
monitor, Sharp JX100 colour 
scanner, plus software. Cost 
£3000. Sell £1600. * A 
Haughty 0633 881051 eves 

Power computing dual 
floppy drives with PSU. 
boxed, top condition £75 
ono. Kindwords v2 word 
processor £20 ono. " Paul 
Cox 0256 475406 

Amiga 1500. Unwanted 
present. 1 month old, 
includes Workbench 2, 
DPaint 3, 1Mb, two disk 
drives, Extras, mouse 
modulator. Fully boxed, 
perfect condition. Cost 
£700, sell for £550. » 
Simon 091 2515218 

8Mb Power Computing RAM 
board for A500/Plus. 
Populated 2Mb. Fully auto 
config. Less than 6 months 
old. £90 ono. « Trenton 
025887 398 after 6pm 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



MJC 



COMPUTER 
SUPPLIES 



Suppliers of Discount Soft ware since 1984 

Educational, Local Authority and government orders 

welcome. European orders please call or write tor a 

quotation. All goods subiect to availability, prices subject 

to change without notice. E&OE. 

Prices include VAT and delivery by post. 

Courier delivery available on request. 

Please allow 5 days for cheque clearance. 

TO ORDER: Credit card orders can be 

placed by calling the telephone number 

below - or send a cheque/PO's made 

out to MJC Supplies to: 

MJC SUPPLIES (ASH) 

Unit 2 The Arches, Icknield Way, 

Letchworth, Herts. SG6 1UJ. 

Tel: (0462) 481166 (6 lines) 



NAKSHA UPGRADE MOUSE 



280 DPI quality replacement mouse - pack includes Mouse 
House, Mat and Operation Stealth game. 

MJC PRICE C21. 95 



SQUIK REPLACEMENT MOUSE 



Great value replacement. 
MJC PRICE £12.95 



A500 PLUS 1Mb Expansion 



1Mb expansion for the A500 Plus - fits in the trapdoor 
taking your memory to 2Mb - no internal fitting 

MJC PRICE £39.95 



NEW • ACTION REPLAY III 



MJC PRICE £57.95 



SUPRA 500RX 2Mb EXPANSION 



This memory expansion for the A500+ uses 1Mb x 4 
chips and can be expanded up to 8Mb 

MJC PRICE £139.95 



CUMANA CAX 354 DISK DRIVE 



Quality brand name 3.5" second drive includes thru 

port, disable switch and FREE Virus X Utility 

MJC PRICE £52.95 



NEW ROCLITE RF382C DISK DRIVE 



New super slimline, super quiet second drive. 
MJC PRICE £57.95 (cream only) 



FUN SCHOOL 

Probably the best selling Educational Software for the 
Amiga - great sound and graphics and now conforms 
to the National Curriculum (FS3 & FS4) 

Fun School 2 - 8 programs per pack 

Fun School 2 under 6 £7.95 

Fun School 2 6 to 8 £7.95 

Fun School 2 over 8 £7.95 

Fun School 3 - 6 programs per pack 

Fun School 3 under 5 £15.95 

Fun School 3 5 to 7 £15.95 

Fun School 3 over 7 £15.95 

NEW - Fun School 4 - 6 programs per pack 

Fun School 4 under 5 £15.95 

Fun School 4 5 to 7 £15.95 

Fun School 4 7 to 11 £15.95 

All Fun School programs will work with a standard 
512k Amiga and the new A500 Plus. 



AMIGA 600 COMPUTER 



The latest Amiga computer featuring surface mount 

technology for greater reliability and the latest 

Workbench 2 comes complete with Deluxe Paint 3 

& Lemmings 

PLEASE NOTE: for total peace of mind these com- 
puters now come with 12 months on site warranty. 

MJC PRICE £275.00 

(Price includes free courier delivery) 



AMIGA A600-HD 



Includes a very neat internal 20Mb hard drive for those 
needing extra storage space and laster loading. 

MJC PRICE £409.95 

(Price includes free courier delivery) 

PLEASE NOTE: A600 prices correct at time ol going 

to press - Please call - they may be even lower! 



AMIGA STARTER PACK 



Includes: 10 disks, mouse mat, joystick, 
dust cover & disk box 

MJC PRICE £19.95 

OR 

JUST £15.95 if purchased with an A600 



AMIGA A600 CONTROL CENTRE 



The Control Centres are manufactured by Premier 
Micros and are made from sheet steel with welded 

seams and Epoxy coated to match the A600. 

They are precision made to fit over the back of the 

A600 to make a perfect platform for a monitor and 

improve the look of the A600. 

They also come complete with a shelf for extra 

drives and peripherals. 

MJC PRICE £34.95 

OR 

JUST £29.95 if purchased with an A600 



NEW - A600 1Mb EXPANSION 



Increases the memory of the A600 to 2Mb 
MJC PRICE £47.95 



AMOS - The Creator 



NEW - EASY AMOS - Powerful but easy .£22.95 
AMOS V1.2 - The original Language....£31.95 

AMOS COMPILER £1 9.95 

AMOS 3D £21 .95 



AMIGA EDUCATIONAL 



KOSMOS Answerback Junior Quiz - 

includes 750 general knowledge questions 

and a game reward £14.95 



..£14.95 



Answerback Senior Quiz - 

as above but for age 12+ 



Factfiles - add-on question packs for the Answerback 
Quiz: 

Factfile Spelling (6-11) £7.95 

Factfile Arithmetic (6-11) £7.95 

KOSMOS Language Tutors: with a vocabulary of over 
2500 words + the ability to add your own - up to GCSE 
level: 

French Mistress £14.95 

German Master £14.95 

Spanish Tutor £14.95 

Italian Tutor £14.95 

KOSMOS Maths Adventure: The latest offering from 
Kosmos covers the National Curriculum maths using a 
series of four games. There are four difficulty levels 
and your performance can be kept and printed 
out. (6-14) E17.95 



NEW • VIDI AMIGA 12 



Vidi Amiga 12 is the latest low cost colour digi- 
tiser from Rombo. There are no filters and no 
separate RGB Splitter. Colour images can be 
captured in less than a second. Mono images 
are grabbed in real time. Some of the features 
included are multi-tasking software, capture 
into a user definable window, composite or S- 
Video input, 4096 colour HAM mode, 64 colour 
EHB mode and many more 

MJC PRICE £79.00 



GVP PRODUCTS 



A500 52Mb HD E349.95 

A1 500/2000 52Mb £279.95 

A1 500/2000 120Mb £419.95 

NOTE! Hard drive prices include VAT and courier 
delivery. 

SIMMs Modules 1Mb (70ns) £25.95 

2 x1Mb £49.95 

Pro Midi Interface £19.95 

Stereo Master £29.95 

Techno Sound Turbo £29.95 

Romeo Megamix Master £28.95 

Rombo Take 2 £39.95 

Home Accounts 2 £36.95 

Hisoft Devpac 3 £49.95 

Hisoft Hi-Speed Pascal £69.96 

Maxiplan4 £34.95 



NEW - MINI OFFICE AMIGA 



Great new integrated package featur- 
ing Word Processor, Database, 
Spreadsheet, Graphics & Disk Utilities 

MJC PRICE £39.95 



NEW ■ KINDWORDS 3 



Features include: Ability to open two documents at 

once, import Kindwords 2 files, Proximity spell checker 

and thesaurus, text flow around graphics. 

Requires 1 Mb RAM 

MJC PRICE £32.95 

ProtextV4.3 £39.95 

Pen Pal VI .4 £54.95 

Wordworth V1.1 - UK Version £74.95 



LCL SOFTWARE 

Primary Maths Course (3-1 2) £18.95 

Micro Maths (GCSE level) £18.95 

Micro French (GCSE level) £18.95 

Micro English (GCSE level) £18.95 

Reading and Writing Course (3+) £18.95 

NEW- MEET ADI! 

ADI is a friendly alien being that appears on this latest 
range of educational software from Europress (the manu- 
facturers of the Fun School range). Each package is 
specifically designed to follow the National Curriculum for 
a particular school year. 

ENGLISH 11/12: Features pronouns, verbs, 

adverbs, spelling, synonyms and 

prefixes/suffixes MJC Price £17.95 

ENGLISH 12/13: Using dictionaries and 

reference books, construct adverbs, 

punctuate sentences MJC Price £17.95 

MATHS 11/12: Covers geometry, algebra, 

statistics, symmetry, quadrilaterals and 

number operations MJC Price £17.95 



Further information on our Educational range is available in our Educational Supplement ■ on request 



VISA 



Remember - prices include VAT & delivery! 



USER GROUPS 



Find your local group 

1 Rift DlnUn. P».. n IIMIIP1 • l-l _ .— 



1520 Plotter Group (ICPUG) » John 
Bentley 06286 65932 

16-32 Micro Programming AMOS, 
bimonthly fanzine, PD, (Fish->590) 
Membership 100FF/ £10 Contact F 
Moreau, 132 rue Jean Follain, 50000 
Saint-Lo, France « 31 52 20 02 

Amiga Addicts Newsletter and open 
nights For info SAE to A Minnock, 
Clonkelly, Binn, Co Offaly, Ireland. 

Amiga Artists Club 34 Roundhay 
Mount, Leeds LS8 4DW. For Amiga 
artists, musicians and coders. 
Pirates not welcome. Free. » KAM on 
0532 493942, 5-8pm 

AmlgaBASIC club Free bi-monthly 
disk, help for beginners and experts. 
Membership £10/year. Contact 
Conran Ahmad, 15 Weybridge Rd, 
Thornton Heath, Surrey CR7 7LN « 
081 689 9102 

Amiga Beginners' Club 110 Whitehill 
Park, Limavidy, Co. Londonderry 
BT49 0QG. Club to help newcomers. 
Bi-monthly club disk, and a small PD 
library. Membership £2 for a single 
disk, or £20 for every issue 

Amiga Computer Club PD Library, 
graphics, video, DTP, monthly mag 
SAE for details to R McDonald, 3 
Islay Court, Irvine KA11 4JQ 

Amiga help club Contact John 
Kewley, Derlwyn, New St, Bethel, Nr 
C'von, Gwynedd, LL57 1YW. 
Meetings Mondays 7 - 10pm. 
Graphics, sound, Workbench, 



If your group isn't mentioned, fill 
in the form at the bottom of the 
page to let us know about you 



programming, help on any topic. 
Beginners welcome. Free 
membership 

Amiga Helpline Contact Gordon 
Keenan, 21 Skirsa Place, Glasgow 
G23 5EE. Software/hardware help 
service, free PD, DTP problems 
sorted, plus general Amiga chit-chat. 
Send a stamp for full details. 
Membership £15/year 

Amiga Mania For details contact D 
Cryer, 88 Blackbull Rd, Folkestone, 
Kent CT19 5QS 

Amiga Musicians' Club Membership 
gets you a disk with 50 IFF samples a 
month for 12 months. Also sample 
service. Membership £30. Contact 
Gavin Wylie, Guthrie Street, 
Carnoustie, Angus 

Amiga Navigation Contact Dave 
Thomas 4a, Allister St, Neath, W 
Glamorgan. PD, advice, even small 
repairs and social evenings. Weds 7 
- 9pm. Membership £10/year 

Amiga Network International 2 

monthly club disk, reviews, advice. 
For info contact Phil or Steve: 434 
Denby Dale Rd East, Wakefield, W 
Yorks WF4 3AE 

Amiga PD Oliver MacDonald at 



GET YOURSELF LISTED 

If you run a user group which isn't listed on this page, fill in the 
form below for your free entry. Send It to Amiga Shopper User 
Groups List, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. We reserve the 
right to refuse entries. 



AS19 



Group name.... 
Contact name. 



Contact telephone number . 
Contact address 



Place of meetings . 
Time of meetings .. 
Type of activities .. 



Membership fee 



Tunley, Albaston, Gunnislake, 
Cornwall, PL18 9EL. Small but 
friendly PD Library, 99p a disk. 
Distribute your own written PD. Send 
£1.50 for catalogue disk 

Amiga PD Exchange at 27 Spa Rd, 

Preston, Lancashire, PR1 8SL. 
Chance to exchange PD, shareware, 
Fish and Tbag disks. £1 for disk and 
membership 

Amiga Users' Klub, Windsor House, 
19 Castle St, Bodmin, Cornwall PL31 
2DX. Meets every Friday from 6.30- 
9pm, to expand members' knowledge 
of Amiga and to help solve people's 
problems. Contact Jack Tailing 

Amiga User Group - FYLDE Contact 
Andy Wilkinson « 0253 724607 25 
Glen Eldon Rd, Lytham St Annes, 
Lancashire FY8 2AX. Meetings twice 
a month, newsdisk, tuition, technical 
support, Amiga advice Membership 
£15/year 

Amiga Users club Contact Edward 
Metcalfe « 021 7441430 49 
Burman Rd, Shirley, Solihull, W 
Midlands B90 2BG PD swapping, 
games swapping (not copying), 
competitions, free membership 

Amiga Video Producers' Group 

Meets quarterly in Swindon. For info 
SAE to J Strutton, 8 Rochford CI, 
Grange Park, Swindon, Wilts SN5 
6AB tr 0793 870667 

Amiga Witham Users' Group 85 

Highfields Rd, Witham, Essex CM8 
1LW. Tips and Basic programs. K 
Anderson » 0376 518271 

Amlgaholics Club Free membership. 
Own disk magazine. For further 
information contact Kevin Bryan « 
071-580 2000 Ext 240 or write to 29 
Wolfe Cres, Charlton, London SE7 
8TS 

Amigamania Bi-monthly newsletter 
(tips, advice etc), quality PD, discount 
hardware, software and accessories, 
free advice. Discount card for High St 
shops. Annual membership fee £10. 
Contact S Green, 9 St Lukes Walk, 
Hawkinge. Kent CT18 7EF 

Amos Programmer Club Free 
membership, swap AMOS programs 
and PD, disk magazine and help for 
new users. Contact Gareth Downes- 
Powell, 6 Brassey Avenue, 
Broadstairs, Kent CT10 2DS 

AMOS Programmers' Exchange Free 
membership. Swapping software and 
ideas. Help available. J Lanng, 7 
Majestic Rd, Hatch Warren, 
Basingstoke, Hants RG22 4XD 



Amos Programmers Group John 
Mullen at 62 Lonssdale St, 
Workington, Cumbria CA14 2YD. 
Programming hints, tips, tutorials 
plus several others. SAE for info. £10 
membership for bi-monthly disk mag 

Angus Amiga CDTV club Contact J 
Robertson, 22a High St, Brechin, 
Angus DD9 6ER « 0356 623072. 
Review software, discuss anything 
Amiga. Free membership 

Astro PD Send SAE and blank disk 
for catalogue. Help and advice also 
available. Contact D Benson, 
3 Skiddaw Court, Nunthorpe, 
Middlesborough, Cleveland TS7 ORD 

Avon Micro Computer Club Graphics 
and animation, business and the 
chance to speak to professional 
users. £3 per annum. Contact Roger: 
95 Downend Rd, Horfield, Bristol 
» 0272 513224 

Basic Programmers' Group 68 

Queen Elizabeth Dr, Normanton, West 
Yorks WF6 1JF. Encourages the use 
of Basic, exchanges ideas and 
assists beginners to the language. 
Free newsletter Mark Blackall 
« 0924 892106 

Beaconsfleld and district CC Contact 
Philip Lishman w 0494 782298 27 
Russell Court, Chesham, Bucks. 
Meetings at St Michaels Hall, St 
Michaels Green, Beaconsfleld 7.45- 
9.45pm. Programming, gaming 
swapping PD, having fun. 
Membership £20/pa; £10/6 months 

Bloomfield video and computing 

Contact Mrs Beryl Hughes * 0267 
2357522 Nashville, 50 Glynderi, 
Carmarthen, Dyfed SA31 2EX. 
Meetings at the Bloomfield 
Community Centre, 7.30pm alternate 
Tuesdays. Amiga for beginners, video 
techniques etc. Membership £5 

BR & CJ Computer Club B Robinson 
at 23 Fairway Rd, Shepshed, 
Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE12 
9DS tr 0392 72889 or 03922 
841296. Regular disk mag packed 
with tips, reviews of games and 
serious software, game cheats 
database, demos and utils, very large 
PD library. Membership fee £1.25 

Camberley User Group Lectures, 
competitions, advice, meetings, free 
membership. For more info contact F 
Wellbelove « 0252 871 545 

Champion PD Club PD at 30p. 

newsletters, advice, help and more. 
Membership £10. Contact Steve 
Pickett, 31 Somerset Close, 
Catterick, N Yorkshire, DL9 3HE 

Chester-le-Street 16-Bit Computer 
Club Ground floor function suite, The 
Civic Centre, Newcastle Rd, Chester- 
le-Street. Meets Mondays from 7.30- 
9.30pm. Exchange advice and swap 
tips. « Peter Mears 091 385 2939 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



USER GROUPS 



CDTV Users Club Swap views on 
software and hardware. Contact 
Julian Lavanini, 113 Fouracres Rd, 
Newall Green, Manchester M23 8ES 

Chic Computer Club Full details with 
an SAE to STAMP, Chic Computer 
Club, PO Box 121, Gerrards Cross, 
Bucks. Contact Steve Winter « 0753 
884473 

Club Amiga £10 a year for PD and a 
24-hr helpline service (091-385 
2627). For more info send SAE to 
Chris Longley, 5 Bowes Lea, Shiney 
Row, Houghton Le Spring, Tyne and 
Wear 

Club Futura Advice to programmers 
and beginners. Send SAE for info to 
G Holland, 16 Hermiston, 
Monkseaton, Whitley Bay, Tyne & 
Wear NE25 9AN 

Comp-U-Pal Australian group for 
users in the outback. Newsletter, 
helpline, PD library. Membership 
A$24. Comp-U-Pal, c/o MDA, PO Box 
29. Knoxfield 3180, Victoria. 
Australia 

Computeque Steve Lalley at Inskip 
Meeting Hall, Ashurst, Skelmersdale, 
Lanes on 0695 31378 7.45pm - 
10.30 pm every Tuesday. From 
beginner to advanced user. Half year 
membership £2.50 children, £3 
adults 

Computer Club 16 Laton Rd, 
Hastings, East Sussex « 0424 
421480. A 16-bit club dedicated to 
being computer enthusiasts 
Membership costs £15 per year 

Deluxe Cheats Disk User Group 

Steven Frew at 96 Campden Green, 
Solihull, West Midlands, B92 8HG. 
Software advice. Updates every 2 
months! £4 for disk £2 for updates 

Edinburgh Amiga Group Membership 
£5, includes free advice and PD. 
Contact Neil McRea, 37 Kingsknowe 
Road North, Edinburgh EH14 2DE 
with SAE 

Enfield Amiga club Contact Sean 
Clifton w 081 8042867 32a Hoe 
Lane, Enfield, Middx Meet, swap, 
competitions, helping new users with 
problems 

Exeter 16 Bit User Group Andrew 
Deeley or Phil Treby at 25A 
Gloucestershire Rd, Exwick. Exeter, 
EX4 2EF. Meeting every Wednesday 
7pm. Programming £6 per annum 

Galactik PD Contact 10 Crugan Ave, 
Klnmel Bay, Clwyd LL18 5DG. 
Demos, music, utilities, games, 
£1.50 for catalogue disk 

GFA Basic Forum Contact J Findlay 
» 0788 891197 or send SAE to 52 
Church Rd, Braunston, Nr Daventry 
Northants NN11 7HQ. Free advice on 
programming in GFA. Also tutorial 
disk for sale. Beginners and 
advanced users welcome. Free 
membership 

Guru Masters PD, demos etc, 
contact the Sheriff, 111 Sherbourne 



Rd, Banbury, Wolverhampton, WV10 
9EU « 0902 782277 

Hampshire PD Club Mike Gallienne at 
79. Carless CI, Rownes, Gosport. 
Hants, P013 9PW on 0705 585323. 
Public Domain Disks at 35p. 
Competitions once a month. Send an 
SAE for more info to the above 
address. £10 a year 

Hereford Amiga Group Membership 
free, help, exchange of PD and 
shareware. Lotus Turbo 2 Quad 
Player Championship. Contact John 
Macdonald, Alma Cottage, 
Allensmore, Hereford HR2 9AT tr 
0981 21414 

Hornesoft PD Amiga PD from 20p to 
69p. Send SAE and disk for 
catalogue. Contact 23 Stanwell CI. 
Wincobank, Sheffield S9 1PZ 

In Touch Amiga Penpals, contacts, 
PD, swaps £2.50/year. For more 
information contact P Allen, 0342 
835530, PO Box 21, Lingfield, Surrey 
RH7 6YJ 

Independent Commodore Products 

Users' Group Biggin Hill Library, 

Church Rd, Biggin Hill, Kent. Meets 

most Thursdays from 7.45-9.45pm. 

Lectures and open nights. » John 

Bickerstaff after 8.30pm 081-651 

5436. Also national network of user 

groups. Contact individual groups for 

details on activities, cost, meetings 

etc: 

Andover « R Geere 0264 790003 

Anglesey « N Massey 0407 765221 

Coventry « W Light 0203 413511 

Dublin » G Reeves 010 353 12 

883863 

Leeds » R Eyre 0532 487691 

Macclesfield « P Richardson 0298 

23644 

Merseyslde » G Titherington 051 

521 2553 

Mid Thames « M Hatt 0753 645728 

S Wales ICPUG * | Kelly 0222 

513815 

Solent « A Dimmer 0705 254969 

SouthWest « P Miles 0297 60339 

Stevenage « B Grainger 0438 

727925 

Watford « B Rigby 0923 264510 

W Riding » K Morton 0532 537318 

Wlgan » B Caswell 0942 213402 

JJC Amiga correspondence course 
£50/year. Contact PO Box 19, High 
Wycombe, Bucks HP11 1UF. « 0494 
983347 

Kent Youth Computer Group Contact 
Jim Fanning « 0233 629804 North 
Youth Centre, Essella Rd, Ashford, 
Kent. Meetings at the North Youth 
Centre, Thursdays 7 - 10pm 
computer fair visits, video and DTP 
work, monthly newsletter Membership 
40p/month 

Lothian Amiga Users Group Contact 
Andrew Mackie « 0506 630509 52 
Birniehill Ave, Bathgate, W Lothian 
EH48 2RR Advice and help in buying 
hardware, software etc, group buying, 
dealers' circulars welcome. 
Membership free 

Maritime Amiga Club Maritime 
computing, interact with seafarers 



ashore on Amigas. Contact CDR K 
Osei, GN Ships Refit Office, 51 Rue 
de la Bretonniere, 50105 Cherbourg, 
France. » 33 33225447 

Marksman (Trojan Phazer user group) 
Contact David Green, 67 Thicket 
Drive, Maltby, Rotherham, S 
Yorkshire S66 7LB Promotes use of 
the Trojan Phazer, swaps PD and own 
programs, aims to set up a disk 
magazine 

N Ireland Amiga User Contact 
Stephen Hamer, 98 Crebilly Rd, 
Ballymena. Co Antrim BT42 4DS. 
Disk based mag£2.50/issue. Free 
PD, SAE for further info 

Norwich Masked Heros SAE for info. 
Free membership. Contact Zorro, 278 
Aylsham Rd, Norwich, Norfolk 
NR32RG » 0603 409899 

Pennine Amiga Club 26 Spencer 
Street, Keighley. West Yorkshire 
BD21 2BU. Free membership, free 
advice and a newsletter. Contact 
Neville Armstrong for more info 
w 0535 609263 

Perth and district amateur computer 
society Contact Alastair MacPherson 
137 Glasgow Rd, Perth. Meetings 
third Tuesday in every month, 8pm. 
General advice, talks, Amiga PD. 
Membership £6 or free for under 16s 

Public Domain Exchange Demos, 
music, utilities, animation. Annual fee 
£8 Contact D McLeish, 26 Taunton 
Ave, Leigh, Lanes WN7 5PT 

Public Domain User Group Swaps 
PD, provides advice. SAE to 12 
Oxford Rd, Guildford, Surrey 

PUG Contact S Jackson » 0446 
772331 Whitebeam Cottage, 
Trerhyngyll, Cowbridge, S Glamorgan 
Cheap PD library, swap hints, 
reviews, articles etc. SAE for more 
details 

Redburn Computer User Group 
Contact Paul Armstrong « 0294 
56003, 12 Highfield St, Kilwinning, 
Ayrshire KA13 7BN. Meetings at the 
Redburn Community Centre, Dickson 
Drive, Irvine. Group meets every 
second Wednesday from 5 Aug 92, 
6.45 - 9.30pm. Help, ideas. PD and 
shareware, graphics and business. 
Membership 75p per meeting; 
£7 /year 

Rye Computer Club Swap/meet at 
the Rye Community Centre. For info 
contact Oliver Campion. 71 The Mint, 
Rye, E Sussex TN31 7DP » 0797 
222876 

Serious Amiga Users Membership 
£5, £1 admission. Contact J Kucak 
for more: « 0706 290387. 
Fortnightly meetings 7.30-11 at the 
High Crompton Conservative Club 

Shleldsoft PD at Wilmar Lodge, 13 
Churton Rd, Rhyl, CLwyd.LL18 3NB. 
Write for more information. Basic 
programming help. Advice on the CLI 
and AMOS. Disks from only 50p to 
80p. Membership free « 0745 
343044 



Sherlock PD Quarterly disk mag, help 
and advice for beginners. 50p/disk. A 
Doyle. 44 Milton Street. Warrenpoint, 
Co Down, N Ireland 

Shropshire Amiga Link Advice, 
monthly disk mag. PD £15/year fee. 
Contact N Cockayne, 2 Dodmoor 
Grange. Randlay. Telford. Shropshire 
TF3 2AW -n- 0952 591376 

Slim Agnus 115 Brocks Drive. North 
Cheam, Sutton. Surrey SM3 9UW. 
Group meets the last Thursday of 
every month. PD library, BBS, advice 
from Amiga experts. Contact Philip 
Worrel. 

Software Exchange Service 13 

Bournville Lane, Stirchley, 
Birmingham, West Midlands B30 2JY. 
For more info » Michael Pun 021-459 
7576 

South 16 Bimonthly mag and disk, 
also PD library. SAE for more info. 
£10/year. Contact Bruce, PO Box 16. 
Southampton S09 7AU 

South Wales Club Newsletter, PD 
library, free newsletter, programs, 
help and advice. For more info 
contact D Allen 53 West Avenue, 
Trecenydd, Caerphilly, CF8 2SF 

Unique Styles Derek at 15 
Montgomery Rd, Highbrooms, 
Tunbridge Wells, Kent on 0892 
518319. By post only. For Amiga 
artists, programmers/musicians. Free 
membership 

Wardray Hern Consortium User group 
of user groups for Amiga and possibly 
others. Membership fees to be 
discussed and incurred. PD library to 
be set up. Also Hem connection - 
worldwide contacts wanted. SAE and 
disk to WardCon info, (AS) Warren 
Hardy, 21 Stockfield Ave, Fenham, 
Newcastle upon Tyne NE5 2DX 

Warpdrive (friends of Amiga) Amiga 
help-line, PD library, bi-monthly disk 
mag, free drinks, competitions and 
infosheet. £15 a year. Contact B 
Scales 110 Burton Ave, Balby, 
Doncaster DN4 8BB w 0302 859715 

WCSPSA! Help available. PD disk of 
your choice and newsletter every 
month. PD at £1. Membership fee 
£25. For more information contact A 
Jamieson * 0749 677609 

Wrexham District Computer Club PD, 

library, equipment loan. lOp to join, 
50p to get in. Meetings at the 
Memorial Hall, Wrexham every 
Thursday, 7-10pm. Contact Paul 
Evans, 3 Ffordd Elfed, Rhosnesi, 
Wrexham, Clwyd LL12 7LU 

Your Amiga Club Helplines, PD, 
social evenings, classes, club mag. 
Fee: £12, family £15. Contact P 
Hlggins = 0424 892269. The Old 
Chapel, Church Rd, Catsfield Battle, 
Sussex TN33 9DP 

Zymurgy General Amiga computing 
etc. Free membership. For further 
information contact A Carr, 39 
Sewlkirk Rd, Ipswich, Suffolk IP4 3JB. 
tr 0473 725241 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



15 



PROGRAMMING 



Hacking 
away 

Garden shears in hand, Cliff Rams haw has 
a look at pruning trees with the aim of 
improving his noughts and crosses program 
in his ongoing tutorial for beginners 



This Is the root of the tree, with an empty board 




At this point, there 
moves left, hence 




ow that we've looked at 
all of the important 
routines which 
constitute a noughts 
and crosses program, it's 
time to put them together to make 
a working game. The finished 
version is shown in Listing 1 on the 
opposite page. 

If you type this in and run it, you 
may well be shocked. It takes the 
computer in excess of 15 minutes to 
make its first move. With every new 
move made, this response time is 
reduced, until the last couple of 
moves are made instantaneously. If 
you have the patience to persevere, 
you'll find that the computer is an 
infallible player - it always either 
wins or forces a draw. Nevertheless 
speed is certainly a problem with this 
program. Fortunately there are a 
couple of steps that can be taken to 
remedy it. 



The first is to 
create a separate 
first move 
generator. At the 
beginning of the 
game there are 
more possible 
positions for the 
computer to move 
into than at any 
other time, and 

therefore it takes longer for it to 
reach a decision. What we need is 
an entirely separate, and much 
faster, decision making process for 
just this one move. The principle is 
the same as that used in chess 
programs, which keep a library of 
possible opening moves and choose 
one at random. 

The difference is that with 
noughts and crosses there is only 
one sensible opening move: to take 
a corner position. OK, that's actually 
four possible moves, but there is no 
material difference in choosing one 
corner over another. In fact, no 
decision making process is needed 
at all for the first move: all we have 



At each stage, the 
computer plays 

every single 
possible game" 



to do is place the computer's nought 
in the top left hand corner of the 
board, at co-ordinates (1,1). This can 
be done by modifying the If clause 
just after the statement which reads: 

Input "Would you like to J 
go first?", - 

to the following: 

If Upper$(Left$(A$,l))="N" J 
Then BOARD ( 1, l)=NOUGHT 
DISPLAY 

and so on as before. The function 
Upper$ converts any lowercase 
characters in a string to uppercase. 
It's used here so that we don't have 
to check for both an 'n' and an 'N' 
character. The function LeftS takes a 
string and returns the left hand part 
of it, of a length determined by the 
^^^^^^^^ number following the 
string's name and a 
comma. In this case, 
Left$ yields only the 
first character from 
the string A$. 

Note that if the 
player elects to go 
first, then the 
computer's 
responding move is 
chosen in the normal 
way, since it is dependent on the 
player's move. 

Of course, this doesn't affect the 
speed of the rest of the game, which 
still leaves something to be desired. 
The solution lies in a technique 
known as pruning. 

PRUNING PRINCIPLES 

The term arises because of the 
search strategy that the program 
adopts, which is commonly called a 
search tree. The initial board position 
is the root of the tree, and each of 
the possible moves that the 
computer tries forms a branch of the 
tree. With each level of recursion, 
these branches split as each of the 



possibilities at that level is tried out. 
When one of these branches has 
gone as far as it can - in other 
words, once the game has ended 
along that branch - the final move is 
termed a leaf. 

Have a look at the diagram 
directly above for a clearer 
illustration of the analogy. 

A THOROUGH SEARCH 

With the program as it stands every 
branch is looked at, right up to the 
leaves. 

At each stage in the game, the 
computer plays every single possible 
game from then onwards to the end 
of the game, and then chooses the 
one that it considers best. However, 
it is possible to realise that 
searching certain branches are 
fruitless (sorry!) and that there is no 
point in exploring them further. 
These branches are cut off from the 
search tree, or 'pruned', leaving the 
computer free to search those 
branches that are more likely to yield 
results. 

How, you may well ask, is this 
done? Well, it goes like this... 

MODIFYING MIMAX 

The procedure MIMAX has to be 
modified to take two extra 
parameters, LEAST and CUTOFF. It 
now looks as follows: 

Procedure J 

MIMAX [TORN, LEAST, CUTOFF] 

Shared BOARD( ) .EMPTY 

GAMEOVER 

If Param=True 
STATIC [TORN] 
RESDLT=Param 
Else 

LEASTSOFAR=LEAST 

For X=l To 3 

For Y=l To 3 

If LEASTSOFAR>COTOFF 

If BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY 

BOARD (X,Y)=TDRN 

MIMAX [-TURN, -CUTOFF,- J 

LEASTSOFAR] 



One of these moves presents a further 
eight possibilities, or branches 



are only seven possible 
seven branches 

BOARD ( X , Y ) =EMPTY 

If Param< LEASTSOFAR 

LEASTSOFAR=Param 

End If 

End If 

End If 

Next Y 

Next X 

RE SULT= - LEASTSOFAR 

End If 

End Proc [RESULT] 

The only other modification to be 
made is to the BESTMOVE 
procedure, the only place from which 
MIMAX is called (aside from within 
itself). The call has to be modified to 
take these two new parameters into 
account. So the line which read: 

MIMAX [-TURN] 

should be modified to read: 

MIMAX [-TURN, 255, -255] 

MIMAX looks at each empty board 
position in turn, and places a piece 
in it. Then it calls itself recursively. 
The result that is returned is the best 
possible score, the lowest, that 
could be obtained as a consequence 
of making this move. 

The computer knows that if the 
move considered gives it the 
opportunity to win the game, then 
there is no point in going further and 
checking the other possible moves 
from this position. In this case, none 
of the other moves are checked at 
this level of the recursion and the 
routine ends. 

VALUABLE MOVES 

When MIMAX is initially called from 
BESTMOVE, the variables LEAST and 
CUTOFF are given values of 255 and 
-255 respectively. The variable LEAST 
is used to initialise the variable 
LEASTSOFAR, which keeps a track of 
the best move found so far by 
MIMAX. The value is initially very 
large so no matter what the score of 



52 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



PROGRAMMING 



a move is found to be, it will be 
assigned to LEASTSOFAR in 
preference to 255. In fact, 
LEASTSOFAR will quickly diminish to 
a value of +1 if not lower, the only 
possible values returned from a call 
to MIMAX being -1, and +1. 

The negative of this value is then 
passed to the recursive invocation of 
MIMAX as the CUTOFF parameter. 
Meanwhile the CUTOFF variable 
(which has a value of -255 initially) is 
inverted and passed to the recursive 
invocation of MIMAX as the LEAST 
parameter. 

After MIMAX has checked one 
space on the board and then called 
itself, it will be doing so with a value 
of 255 for LEAST (as before) and a 
minimum value of -1 for CUTOFF. 

At this secondary level of 
recursion, the positions on the board 
will cease to be checked as soon as 
one is found with a score less than 
or equal to CUTOFF. Given that 
CUTOFF has a value of -1, this will 
occur as soon as a move resulting in 
a win for the computer has been 
found. If CUTOFF has a value of 0, it 
will occur as soon as a move 
resulting in a win or draw is found. If 
CUTOFF has a value of +1, then no 
further moves will be checked at this 
level. 

LESS CHECKS 

As you can see, the process of 
swapping CUTOFF and LEASTSOFAR 
at each successive level of recursion 
means that many fewer positions 
have to be checked before a final 
result is established. If you modify 
the program as instructed above, 
you'll find there's a marked 
difference in efficiency. 

Well that about wraps it up for 
noughts and crosses. There are of 
course many other modifications you 
could make to the program, or even 
completely different approaches to 
the problem, but I'll leave these for 
you to make. 

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT 

This series should have taught you 
enough of the fundamentals of 
programming to give you the 
confidence to attempt writing other 
programs of your own. 

We've gone right from the basics 
of programming to fairly advanced 
concepts such as procedures, local 
variables and recursion. 

Hopefully, you've managed to 
keep up, but if not I suggest you 
have a look back through the 
articles, pay careful attention to 
the code examples and, above all, 
mess around yourself. Improving 
your programming ability, like that of 
any activity, is best achieved 
through practice. So keep 
experimenting! Think of a program 
you'd like to have, and start writing 
it. Good luck. (& 



LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 



LISTING 1 

Dim BOARD (3, 3) 

EMPTY=0 

CROSS=-l 

NOUGHT=l 

For X=l To 3 

For Y=l To 3 

BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY 

Next Y 
Next X 
Cls 

Input "Would you like to go 
first? -;AS 
If UpperS (LeftS (AS, 1))="N" 

BESTMOVE [NOUGHT] 

BOARD ( XBEST , YBEST ) =NOUGHT 
End If 
DISPLAY 
Repeat 
PMOVE 
DISPLAY 
GAMEOVER 
If Param=False 

XBEST=0 

YBEST=0 

BESTMOVE [NOUGHT] 

If XBESToO 

BOARD ( XBEST , YBEST ) =NOUGHT 
DISPLAY 
End If 
End If 
FULL 
A=Param 
WON [NOUGHT] 
B=Param 
WON [CROSS] 
C=Param 

Until (A=True) or (B=True) 
or(C=True) 
Locate 0,20 
If A=True 

Print "It's a draw" 
Else 

If B=True 

Print "I won" 
Else 

Print "You won" 
End If 
End If 
Stop 

Procedure HORIZLINE [TURN] 
Shared BOARD () 
RESULT=False 

If (( BOARD (1,1)=TURN and 
BOARD(2,l)=TURN and 
BOARD(3,l)=TURN) 
or(BOARD(l,2)=TURN and 
BOARD(2,2)=TURN and 
BOARD(3,2)=TURN) 
orlBOARD(l,3)=TURN and 
BOARD(2,3)=TURN and 
BOARD(3,3)=TURN)) Then 
RESULT=True 
End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure VERTLINElTURN] 
Shared BOARD!) 
RESULT=False 
If ((BOARD (1,1) =TURN and 
BOARD(l,2)=TURN and 
BOARD(l,3)=TURN) 
or(BOARD(2,l)=TURN and 
BOARD (2,2) =TURN and 
BOARD ( 2 , 3 ) =TURN) 
or(BOARD(3,l)=TURN and 



BOARD(3,2)=TURN and 
BOARD(3,3)=TURN) ) Then 
RESULT=True 
End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure DIAGLINE[TURN] 
Shared BOARD!) 
RESULT=False 
If ( (BOARD(l,l)=TURN and 
BOARD(2,2)=TURN and 
BOARD(3,3)=TURN) 
or(BOARD(3,l)=TURN and 
BOARD(2,2)=TURN and 
BOARD(l,3)=TURN)) Then 
RESULT=True 
End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure WON [TURN] 
Shared BOARD () 
RESULT=False 
HORIZLINE [TURN] 

If Param=True Then RESULT=True 
VERTLINE[TURN] 

If Param=True Then RESULT=True 
DIAGLINE[TURN] 

If Param=True Then RESULT=True 
End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure FULL 
Shared BOARD 0, EMPTY 
RESULT=True 
For X=l To 3 
For Y=l To 3 

If BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY Then 
RESULT=False 

Next Y 
Next X 

End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure GAMEOVER 
Shared BOARD!) .NOUGHT, CROSS 
RESULT=False 
FULL 

If Param=True Then RESULT=True 
WON [NOUGHT] 

If Param=True Then RESULT=True 
WON [CROSS] 

If Param=True Then RESULT=True 
End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure STATIC [TURN] 
Shared BOARD 
WON [TURN] 
If Param=True 

RESULT=1 
Else 

WON [-TURN] 
If Param=True 

RESULT— 1 
Else 

RESULT=0 
End If 
End If 

End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure MIMAX [TURN] 
Shared BOARD ( ) , EMPTY 
GAMEOVER 
If Param=True 
STATIC [TURN] 
RESULT=Param 
Else 

LEASTSOFAR=255 
For X=l To 3 
For Y=l To 3 

If BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY 
BOARD (X,Y)=TURN 
MIMAX [-TURN] 
BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY 
If 
Param<LEASTSOFAR 



LEASTSOFAR=Param 

End If 
End If 
Next Y 
Next X 

RESULT=-LEASTSOFAR 
End If 

End Proc [RESULT] 
Procedure BESTMOVE [TURN] 
Shared 

BOARD ( ) , XBEST , YBEST , EMPTY 
GAMEOVER 
If Param=True 

XBEST=0 : YBEST=0 
Else 

LEASTSOFAR=255 
For X=l To 3 
For Y=l To 3 

If BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY 
BOARD (X,Y)=TURN 
MIMAX [-TURN] 
BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY 
If 
Param<LEASTSOFAR 

LEASTSOFAR=Param 

XBEST=X 
YBEST=Y 
End If 
End If 
Next Y 
Next X 
End If 
End Proc 
Procedure PMOVE 
Shared 

BOARD ( ) , CROSS , NOUGHT , EMPTY 

GOOD=0 

Repeat 

Locate 30,16 

Print " 

Locate 0,16 

Input "Enter your move 

(across, down)";X,Y 

If(X>=l) and(X<=3) and(Y>=l) 

and(Y<=3) Then If 

BOARD (X,Y)=EMPTY Then G00D=1 

Until GOOD=l 

BOARD(X,Y)=CROSS 

End Proc 

Procedure DISPLAY 

Shared 

BOARD ( ) , CROSS , NOUGHT , EMPTY 

CIS 

Print " 12 3" 

Print 

Print "1" 

Print 

Print "2" 

Print 

Print "3" 

Draw 28,0 To 28,59 

Draw 44,0 To 44,59 

Draw 0,28 To 59,28 

Draw 0,44 To 59,44 

For X=l To 3 

For Y=l To 3 

Locate X*2,Y*2 
If BOARD (X,Y)=CROSS Then 
Print "X" 

If BOARD (X,Y)=NOUGHT 
Then Print "O" 

Next Y 
Next X 
End Proc 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



COMPUTER LIFE 




GENETIC ALGORITHM PROGRAM 

PART ONE 



This month Philip Gladwin shows 
how virtual creatures learn the 
ropes of life with a little help from 
genetic algorithms 



If you were listening last 
month you'll remember that 
the point of this series is to 
show how the principles of 
natural selection can help us write 
code that evolves Into a superfrt 
state. The problem we're going to 
look at is that faced by every small, 
hungry, virtual creature wandering 
around in a virtual wood. When we 
first meet this creature it will be 
roaming around, getting nowhere, 
banging its head on trees and 
missing the food that's under its 
nose because it's simply too stupid 
to find it. We're going to bring it to 
a state where we can watch it run 
straight for the food and miss the 
trees. 

One way of helping such a 
creature would be to spoonfeed it 
with expert system type rules about 
what to do depending on where it 
finds itself in the wood. Then 
whichever situation it encountered it 
would recognise it and know what 
action would bring it most oenefit. 

Of course there are people who 
would say that in order to be truly 
charitable you have to give hungry 
people tools rather than food. So 
let's be truly humane and give this 
creature the tools for its own 
salvation, principles by which its 
knowledge about the wood can 
evolve until it becomes useful. 
Thus, instead of our creature 



CORRECTION CORNER 

The astute among you will have 
noticed that a slight error crept 
into last month's diagram 
illustrating the three rule 
classifier system. The top row 
should have had a '1' under the 
•feed if column. Apologies for 
any confusion which this may 
have caused. 



being dependent on us for 
everything, it will learn - completely 
un-assisted - rules to show that 
banging its head on trees is 
pointless and that eating food is the 
best way of stopping that gnawing 
pain in its stomach. Then it can 
stand up on its own six feet and be 
proud of what it has done instead of 
being forever in our debt. (The other 
thing it could do is come after us and 
murder us for not giving it food when 
it was hungry, but that's another 
story). 

GENE LIVES! 

So how do we simulate this 
creature? (Let's, out of a kind of 
weak humour, call it Gene). There 
are four principles that are worth 
thinking about before we do any 
coding: 

• When any creature is born it lives 
in a continual torrent of sensory 
signals. This must be so for Gene, 
and he must learn to distinguish 
which signals are important, and 
which are irrelevant. 

• Gene must be capable of taking 
actions which will change the 
aensory signals he is perceiving. 

• He must learn pretty quickly that 
some signals have a special 
importance for him - such as those 
that occur when he eats some food. 

• He must want to make those 
special signals happen as often as 
he can. This is a priority that ought 
to be reflected in his actions. 

Gene's environment, the wood where 
he first sees the light of day, is full 
of obstacles: trees and rocks, and 
food; apples. We can represent a 
wood like this on the computer by 
creating a grid, with squares that are 
empty, or that hold trees, or that 



Dim WOOD$(16),RULE$ J 

(40,2),STRENQTH#(40),M(40) J 

,A(40) ,OLD_A(40) , PERCENT ( 110 ) 

Dim AV(50),SPLICE(40) 

Global WOODS 0, RULES (), J 

XLOC,YLOC, J 

REWARD_FLAG,GENE_VISION$, J 

STRENGTH#() 

Global J 

M(),A(),OLD_A(), WALKED, J 

CYCLE_COUNTER, FIRSTJTIME 

DOT 

Repeat 

CYCLE 

Inc COUNT 

Until COUNT=550 

Procedure BUILD_WOODS 

WOOD$(1)=" » 

WOOD$ ( 2 ) = " " 

WCOD$(3)=". .T. .T. .T. .T " 

WOOD$(4)="..F..F..F..F " 

WOOD$ (5) =" " 

WOODS (6) =" » 

WOODS (7)=". . .T. .T. .T. .T. . ." 
WOOD$(8)="...F..F..F..F..." 

WOOD$(9)=" » 

WOOD$(10)=" » 

WOOD$(ll)="..T. .T..T..T " 

WOOD$(12)=". .F. .F. .F. .F " 

WOOD$(13)=" " 

WOODS (14) =" " 

WOOD$(15)=" " 

WOODS (16)=" " 

End Proc 

Procedure CYCLE 

PROBLEM 

If Rnd(3)=0 Then GENETIC 

Inc CYCLE_CODNTER 

If CYCLE_COUNTER=51 Then J 

CYCLE_COUNTER=l 

GRAPH_RESULT 

End Proc 

Procedure DRW_WOOD 

Paper : Locate 50,0 

Print WOODS (1) 

For 1=2 To 16 

Locate 50,1-1 

Print WOODS (I) 

Next I 

Locate XLOC+49,YLOC-l : J 

Pen 5 : Print "*" : Pen 2 

End Proc 

Procedure FIND_CONTENTS[I] 

' used by refresh_yector to J 

look around GENE 

If 1-0 

Y=YLOC-l 

If Y=0 

Y=l 

End If 

LEVELS=WCOD$ (Y) 

CONTENT$=Mid$ ( LEVELS , XLOC, 1 ) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=1 

Y=YLOC-l : X=XLOC+l 

If Y=0 

Y=l 



End If 

If X=17 

X=16 

End If 

LEVEL$=WOOD$ (Y) 

CONTENT$=Mid$ (LEVELS, X, 1) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=2 

X=XLOC+l 

If X=17 

X=16 

End If 

LEVEL$=WOOD$ (YLOC) 

CONTENT$=Mid$ (LEVELS , X, 1 ) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=3 

Y=YLOC+l : X=XLOC+l 

If X=17 

X=16 

End If 

If Y=17 

Y=16 

End If 

LEVELS =WOOD$ (Y) 

CONTENT$=Mid$ ( LEVELS , X, 1 ) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=4 

Y=YLOC+l 

If Y=17 

Y=16 

End If 

LEVEL$=WOOD$ (Y) 

CONTENT$=Mid$(LEVEL$,XLOC, 1) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=5 

Y=YLOC+l : X=XLOC-l 

If Y=17 

Y=16 

End If 

If X=0 

X=l 

End If 

LEVEL$=WOOD$ (Y) 

CONTENT$=Mid$ (LEVELS, X, 1) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=6 

X=XLOC-l 

If X=0 

X=0 

End If 

LEVEL$=WOOD$ (YLOC) 

CONTENT$=Mid$ (LEVELS, X, 1) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

If 1=7 

Y=YLOC-l : X=XLOC-l 

If Y=0 

Y=l 

End If 

If X=0 

X=l 

End If 

LEVELS=WOODS (Y) 



54 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



COMPUTER LIFE 



CONTENT$=Mid$ (LEVEL$,X, 1) 

Goto LEAVEPROC 

End If 

LEAVEPROC: 

End Proc [CONTENT$] 

Procedure INIT 

' Opens the screen, J 

draws the wood, 

' draws the graph to check J 

learning progress 
Randomize Timer 
Screen Open 

1,620, 240, 16, Hires 

Curs Off : Flash Off : J 

Cls : Ink 2 

Polyline 19,10 To 19,210 J 

To 600,210 

Draw 20,10 To 20,210 
Draw 14,10 To 19,10 
Draw 20,10 To 20,90 
Draw 14,50 To 20,50 
Draw 14,90 To 20,90 
Draw 14,130 To 20,130 
Draw 14,170 To 20,170 
Draw 70,210 To 70,215 
Draw 120,210 To 120,215 
Draw 170,210 To 170,215 
Draw 220,210 To 220,215 
Draw 270,210 To 270,215 
Draw 320,210 To 320,215 
Draw 370,210 To 370,215 
Draw 420,210 To 420,215 
Draw 470,210 To 470,215 
Draw 520,210 To 520,215 
Draw 570,210 To 570,215 
Draw 620,210 To 620,215 
Ink 1 

Draw 21,50 To 600,50 
Draw 21,90 To 600,90 
Draw 21,130 To 600,130 
Draw 21,170 To 600,170 
Gr Locate 19,10 
Pen 2 : Paper 
Locate 0,0 : Print 50 
Locate 13,27 : Print 100 
Locate 25,27 : Print 200 
Locate 38,27 : Print 300 
Locate 50,27 : Print 400 
Locate 63,27 : Print 500 
BUILD_WOODS 
INIT_RDLE_SET 
End Proc 

Procedure INIT_RHLE_SET 

' Build Classifiers + J 
Actions randomly, assign each 

' classifier a starting J 
strength of 100 

For 1=1 To 40 

CLASSIFIER$="" 

For J=l To 16 

P0I=Rnd(2) 

If POI=0 Then BIT$="0" 

If POI=l Then BIT$="1" 

If P0I=2 Then BIT$="?" 

CLASSIFIER$=CLASSIFIER$+BIT$ 

Next J 

RULE$ (1,1) =CLASSIFIER$ 

RULE$(I,2)=Str$(Rnd(7))-" " 

STRENGTH# ( I ) =100 . 

Next I 

End Proc 



hold food. As we're using Basic a 
handy way of doing this is to create 
this grid from an array of strings. 
Look at the procedure BUILD_WOOD 
in the source code opposite. It 
establishes 16 strings, of 16 
characters each, to create a grid 16 
rows deep and 16 columns wide. 
Each character represents the 
contents of that square in the grid. 
The dots . indicate that there is a 
space in the wood at that point; the 
capital 7s mean that there is a tree 
filling that square; and the F shows 
there is food in that square. 

Although the grid created by the 
code in BUILD WOOD is quite small, 
Gene won't see it like that. Gene has 
the power to ignore the edges and 
travel immediately from, say, the 
extreme right to the extreme left in 
one leap. To all intents and purposes 
therefore, Gene is cast adrift in an 
unbounded wood. 

The raw materials for Gene are a 
set of rules and actions, holding 
information about the stimuli and 
responses available to him. Although 
Gene may be a perfectly fascinating 
character in his own right who we 
would dearly love to get to know, 
there are only a couple of things that 
we actually need to know about him: 
where he is in the grid, and the 
current state of what he thinks about 
the world. 

The first is easy - define two 
global variables called XPOS and 



"The raw materials 

are a set of rules 

and actions, holding 

information about 

the stimuli and 

responses 

available..." 



YPOS and update them every time he 
actually moves (as opposed to when 
he decides to move and runs smack 
into a tree.) 

The second is more complicated. 
Assume that Gene has two sense 
receptors, one firing when it detects 
something opaque in front of it, and 
one doing the same for things that 
smell. This isn't a whole lot of 
detectors, but it's enough to deal 
with the three types of thing in 
Gene's world: space, trees, and 
food. Space is perceived by Gene as 
an absence of signal at both of his 
detectors. A tree causes his opacity 
detector to switch on, but produces 
no response from his smell detector; 
and food causes a positive response 



from both. We can say therefore that 
space in any particular location is 
represented by the digits 00, a tree 
by 01, and food by 11. As Gene can 
see the contents of all his neighbour 
squares, at any one time his 
knowledge can be described by a 16 
bit vector, with two bits for each of 
the eight possible directions. (See 
the diagram below for an illustration 
of this). In the program this vector - 
the sum of what Gene can currently 
see - is stored in the string 
GENE_VISION$ 



see if he recognises the situation. If 
he can find a classifier that matches 
GENE_V1SION$, with the 7s in the 
classifier acting as wild cards and 
matching both 1 and 0, then he is in 
luck - he knows what to do. 

The knowledge about the action 
Gene will take in that situation is 
held in the second column of 
RULES(), which contains strings like 
"2", or "7". These correspond 
directly to directions numbered 0-7, 
starting at 12 o'clock and proceeding 
clockwise (therefore a direction of 3 



Diagram 1 

* = Gene 

T — Raw Sense data vector: . T F 

■ ■ ■ ■ 

. F . * F . . Processed Sense data vector 

(Gene_Vlsion$): 00 01 11 00 00 00 00 00 

(00 = space, 01 = a tree, and 11 = some 

food) 



Top down view of Gene's world: he can see a space directly ahead of 
him, a tree to his north east, and some food directly to his east. Apart 
from that all around him Is empty 



THE STUFF OF MEMORIES 

So Gene can see. He can also move. 
We assume that when he actually 
trips over food he eats it, and that he 
can't move through solid objects. 
Therefore in any situation Gene has 
the possibility of taking one of up to 
eight actions. But if he's ever going 
to move at all sensibly he needs a 
memory. This memory should hold 
many of the situations he has 
encountered before, as well as the 
actions he took at that time. 

The array RULE$(40.2) is such a 
memory - it has room for 40 
different situations, along with their 
associated movements. The first 
column of RULE$() is filled with 
strings 16 characters long, such as 
"0001100110100111" or 
"00001101010??0?1". These are 
classifier rules (remember them from 
last month? These are slightly 
different, being twice as long, and 
each rule coming complete with an 
associated strength carried in the 
array s#(40)). Every time Gene 
moves to a new position within the 
wood he takes a look around him 
and then has a look in his memory to 



is SE, and a direction of is due 
North.) 

Now, it would be easy to cheat 
and. after looking at the wood 
described in Procedure 
BUILDJ/VOOD, to fill Gene's memory 
with rules that matched particular 
situations and had the correct action 
to take already supplied. (Like for 
example in the situation where Gene 
has a tree to his NW and food to his 
W. GENE_VISION$ would be 
0000000000001101. and a good 
classifier/action pair to hard code in 
would be something like 
000000000000???l/6, making 
Gene move west to take the food 
directly.) But that's not the point. We 
want Gene to come to this 
knowledge himself, and so, courtesy 
of Procedure INIT_RULE_SET, 
Gene's memory starts off with junk - 
utterly random information. (Sound 
familiar? Hmm, yes, I thought so). 
Each rule is filled with random 0s, Is 
and ?s, and given the same starting 
strength of 100. This ensures that 
when Gene starts off wandering 
around in the wood he does so 
completely at random. 9-Xl 



COMING NEXT MONTH: GENE WALKS, TALKS, AND TAPDANCES 

As you can see, most of the code I've given you this week has been to do 
with initialisation. I've explained the problem, and the basics of the setup 
we're going to use to solve it. Procedures like MOVE and FILL_ VECTOR are 
fairly straightforward mechanical stuff, and shouldn't cause you too much 
trouble. Next month I'll be getting onto the harder stuff - exactly how this 
random mass of classifiers is prodded along the path of evolution. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



55SJSBS*"- 



Software 
for free 



Ian Wrigley checks out the best in 
Amiga PD and disk mags. This 
month there's a special 
investigation into some of the 
more eccentric offerings available 






After the whinges of the 
last couple of months, 
the software seems to 
have started flowing once 
more. My thanks to the PD libraries 
and the individual authors who have 
been sending in software for review. 
Remember, if you've written a PD or 
shareware program that you want 
me to take a look at, send it in c/o 
Amiga Shopper at the usual 
address. 

This month I'm looking at some 
licenseware from Deja Vu and 
Amiganuts, a couple of new disk 
magazines and the usual round-up of 
what's best in the freely distributable 
software market-place. 

If there are any specific subject 
areas that you'd like to see me cover 
in the future, be sure to write in and 
let me know. 





Morse Code Tutor, from Deja Vu, is a 
powerful and easy to use tutor for 
radio hams - and the loading screen 
looks good tool 



BEGINNERS 



What Is PD? 



fART HER1 



PD is a general 
term which many people 
incorrectly use to refer to all 
freely-distributable software. In 
fact, PD (which stands for Public 
Domain) software Is only one 
branch of this area; the other 
main one Is shareware. 

Essentially, PD software may 
be copied and used by anyone, 
although some authors place 
restrictions such as not allowing a 
PD library to charge more than a 
certain amount for the disk. 

Shareware, on the other hand, 
should be treated more like 
commercial software. 

Although you are allowed to 
copy and pass around shareware 
programs, if you like one then you 
should pay the requested fee to 
the author - it's normally only £15 
or less, and often entitles you to 
an upgraded version or a printed 
manual. 

Paying your shareware fees 




encourages 
software authors 
to write more 
programs - and if they don't, the 
Amiga scene will be a poorer 
place. 

Can I pass other people copies of 
PD? 

Yes - that's the way that it gets 
to a wide audience. Just make 
sure that you have followed the 
author's requirements for 
distribution - normally that you 
don't charge more than a certain 
amount for the disk, and that you 
make sure that all the 
documentation is included on the 
disk. 

You can also pass on 
shareware - but not any 
registered copies of programs. If, 
when you pay your shareware fee, 
the author sends you an improved 
version of the program, then be 
careful not to give that out. You 
should only pass on unregistered 
shareware. 



MORSE CODE TUTOR 

Deja Vu disk L/101 

This program, by Paul Higginson 
(G7EZH) and Jason Dudgeon, is, as 
the name suggests, a Morse code 
tutorial program primarily intended 
for radio amateurs. However, it does 
a little more than 
many other 
tutors. While 
there are some 
areas that could, 
feel, use some 
improvement, 
overall this really 
is a powerful 
tutorial program - 
I might even get 
around to finally 
learning Morse 
myself! 
The program, 
which is written in 
AMOS, is 
supplied on a 
self-booting disk that contains, as its 
first loading screen, the usual Deja 
Vu copyright information. Clicking the 
mouse button takes you on to an 
attractive, digitised image of a typical 
Ham shack, and then to the main 
selection screen, where you choose 
Fl for the program or F2 for the 



pitch at which the Morse will be sent. 
But although the actual pitch is 
displayed as a value in Hertz, there's 
no audible example of what this will 
sound like -just a perky little 'ping' 
which has no relation to the tone 
that you've set. 

Where the program stands out 
from the competition is that it not 
only sends Morse, but receives it too 
- something very few other programs 
do. You can either use the mouse 
(left button is a dot, right button a 
dash), or the fire button of a joystick. 
And, as the authors point out, it's 
easy to connect a real Morse key by 
wiring it into an old joystick 
connector. The program seems to 
receive Morse fairly well, although - 
as with all computer receivers - your 
keying has to be pretty accurate in 
terms of the relative lengths of dots 
and dashes. Still, this is no bad 
thing - the more accurate your keying 
is, the better. 

The program can limit the range 
of characters sent to sections of the 
alphabet, the whole alphabet or full 
alphanumeric and special 
characters. There are send and 
receive practice modes and quizzes 
(although the method that the 
program uses to work out your 



RATING THE PROGRAMS 

Just to be awkward, I rate the software that I review in two 
different ways, depending on what it is. Disk magazines, 
collections of clip art and the like are given a 'value for money' 
rating, since you're paying for one thing on the entire disk. Single 
programs which appear in a collection of others, or programs 
which I've downloaded from bulletin boards, are given a 'program 
rating', which reflects how good I think they are, taking into 
account usability, bug-proofness and so on. Both ratings are out of 
a maximum possible 10. 



documentation - which is well written 
and concise. 

Entering the program proper, you 
decide on the program's action in 
the standard way - by selecting 
choices from the menu bar. There 
are options to change the pitch, 
speed and volume of the Morse code 
to be sent, although there are no 
examples of what result any of this 
will have. For instance, the 'change 
pitch' command displays a neat little 
sliding bar from which you select the 



accuracy is a little suspect), and the 
machine can be hooked up to your 
Morse key when you're actually 
sending on air, so that you have a 
text record of what you've sent. 

While other programs only teach 
you to receive Morse - leaving you to 
develop dreadful keying habits with 
no correction - this one teaches you 
how to send too. If you're thinking of 
learning Morse code - either for your 

continued on page 1 58 



56 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



tv^l Software 



ti 



?&!» 




Expressions 

Introducing some of the best public domain & shareware disks 
available for the Amiga today. Go on. ..express yourself! 



Pe#- 



20 



«** 



+ = Plus Compatible 
UTILITIES 

4U001 ....A-Gene (1 meg) - Trace your ancestors 

+U006 ...Amigazer For those astrologisls 

+U016....Biorhythms(1 meg) Chart your feelings 

U01 7 ....Business pack (3 disks) D/base, s/sheel, w/p 

U024 ....Catalogue Maker (2 disks) Good; be patient! 

+U033— Education 1 Learn German 

+U035 ....Education 3 :. Weather 

t(J036 ....Education 4 Evolution 

U043 ....Intromaker As it sounds. Good 

U049 ....Mandlebrot Explorer Excellent piccies 

U050 ....Master Virus-killer Recognises over 100 viruses. Essential 

+U052 ...Business Card Maker Simple, but useful 

U061 ....Games Music Creator Fav. composition writer 

U062 ....House Samples 2 More acidic sounds 

U063 ....House Samples 3 Even more acidic sounds 

U073....Sid v1.06._ -Cli helper. Very popular 

U076 ....Star Trekker 8 channels, sampler. Superb 

+U078 ....Text Plus „ Word processor 

+U084 ....Wordwright For all you dizlecksicksl 

♦U089 ...Journal Very good account-handler 

+U092.. ..Cartoon Brushes Lots of famous characters 

+U098 ....Database Master Comprehensive AMOS database 

U101 ....C64 Emulator Take your Amiga back to basics 

U104 ....Golf Recorder (1 meg) Excellent disk with pictures 

U106 ....Med v3.1 1 Latest sequencer version 

U1 10 ....Messysid v2.0 .PC to Amiga file transfer 

U1 13 .... Spectrum Emulator Replay the crappy games 

+U118— Amiga Fox D.T.P. Package 

U120 ....ST Emulator Emulate Atari programs 

U121 ...JAB Utilities 22 utilities 

U122 ....Perm Checker Checks pools winnings 

+U123....IQ Tester How thick are you? 

+U124 ....Chess Tutor The quest to become a Grand Master 

+U128....Viz Clip Art ..._ Roger Mony in D Paint 

U129 ....Super Killers Kills 120 Virus's 

+U130..., Label designer Various label printers 

+U134....Ami Cash Best accounts package around 

+U140 ....Amibase Prol Excellent database 

+U142... .Super Fonts More fonts for printing 

+U144. ...Sound Tracker Samples (4 disks) Excellent sounds, 

particularly drumbeats 

+U146....Edword Excellent text editor 

+U149 ....The Main Event .._ File event editor 

U150 ....Languages Spanish. German, Italian + French dictionary 

+U151....lmploderv4.0 _ File compresser 

+U152....PC Task Emulates IBM + PC programs 

+U153....File-a-fax _ As it sounds 

+U154....QED Beginners word processor 

DEMOS 

+D015 ....Agatron Star Wars (1 meg/2 disks) Captivating graphics 

+D016— Arid Music _ Some wicked museec & grapheecs! 

+D021 ....Budbrain 2 The equally brilliant sequel 

D023 ....Bass MegademoElactiifying graphics & pulsating beat. Get it! 

D036 ....Coma/Cebit/Victory (1 meg) Classic Acid-type demos 

+D058 ....Enterprise Leaving Dock Famous animation 

D060 ....Elvira The sexy lady endows herself! 



D061 ....Elvira Activities Now move her body! 

D062 ....5 Ways to Kill a Mole Funny. Not for animal lovers! 

0063 ....Fillet the fish The possible sequel to Puggs. A must 

*D075 ....Girts of Sport Pretty shots of talented girls 

D092 ....Iraq demo (1 meg) Topical cartoon. Bush meets 

Saddam! Bang! 

+D099 ....Jesus loves Aciid Mindblowlng music and graphics 

+01 14. ...Mike Tyson anim Well compiled 

D146....Red Sector megademo (2 disks) RSI's classic 

+D148 ...The Run (1 meg) T. Richter's car-chase animation. Good 

+D162 ....Stealthy Manoeuvres (1 meg) Excellent demo 

♦D166 ....Star Trek Animations Anims. of USS Enterprise 

+D177....Star Trek Anlmations..Agatron no. 17. More like above. Good 

D215 ....Another 5 ways to Kill a Mole It gets sadder! 

+D225 ....Reincarnation of Sgt. Pepper (2 disks, 1 meg).Beatles classic 

D226 ....Virtual World Best demo of year?! 

+D248 ....Pulling the Trigger Good demo compilation 

D250 ....Jimmy Hendrix Slides and music 

+D251 ....Debbie Harry {2 disks) Sideshow Blondie 

-.D253....WWF Wrestlers Hogan&more 

D254 ....Ray of Hope Acidic Demo 

MUSIC 

+M006— Batdance remix Really good disk. Catchy stuff 

+M016....Depeche Mode 8 tracks of reasonable quality 

♦M032....Godbrain loves the world Great acid-house musak 

M038.... Hugo's Excentria...Thls has to be one of the best house disks 
M039....I Love Technology Recent production from Beatmaster. Good 

♦M057— Powerpack 3 (1 meg) Includes Vanilla Ice track 

+M059— Powerpack 5 (1meg) 4 classy house tracks 

+M062... .Random Access ....Art of Noise and more. Startling acid track 

M063... .Special Brothers The Last Intention 

+M080,...Pet Shop Boys Manic mix 

+M081 ....Miami Vice Theme music remix 

M084..,.The Wall Pink Floyd classic 

M085...James Bond Remix Catchy Stuff 

M086 ....Great Balls of Fire — . Goodness gracious 

M087....lron Maiden The Ides of March 

M088....500 things come back demo 4 relaxing tunes 

+M090...1ed Zeppelin Stairway to Heaven etc. 

GAMES 

+G001 ....Autobahn 3000 Control ball through tunnel. Hard 

+G003....Antep(1 meg) Adventure, also stot cars 

G004....Airwar Fighter simulation. Good shareware game. 

+G005 ....All New Star Trek (2 disks) ..USS Enterprise classic. Best one 

+G010— Breakout Classic bat S ball game 

♦G01 1 ....Blizzard Horizontal shoot-'em up. High quality 

G013....Bullrun War-game, based on US Civil War. Control Army 

+G014 Adventure Solutions (2 disks) ....Loads of hints of commercial 
games. Good 

+G015. .. .Crossfire (1 meg) Excellent game written in AMOS 

+G01 9 ....Dungeon Delver (2 disks) Difficult adventure quest 

*G021 ....Demolition Mission (1 meg) ....Similar to Balloonacy, good fun 
+G023.. ..Electronic Train Set 11 meg) Construct own train set 

G029 ....Flaschbier Old favourite. Get to alarm clock 



+G031 ....Gravattack -...-.Control spaceship,, picking up keys 

+G043 ....Learn and Play 1 ....Good for the kids. Blackboard maths, etc. 

+G044 ...learn and Play 2 More fun lor the kids 

*G049 ....Megaball (1 meg) Excellent game. 

Improved version of Breakout 

G050... .Master of the Town Use mouse to smash windows. 

Very addictive 

*G053 ....Mayhem Brilliant shoot-'em-up 

G055 ....Mechforce Strategy game 

G056 ....Monopoly Board game on disk 

+G059 ....Nethack (Fish 460)Good adventure game, recently appraised 

G060 ....Pipeline Build an oil pipeline 

+G061 ....Pick up a puzzle (1 meg/2 disks) Fit the pieces. Good for 

the kids 

G062 ....3D Pool Control cue with mouse, and ifs all pot luck! 

G063 ...Pacman The classic game still here 

+G065....Pixie Kingdom (2 disks) Tricky adventure game. Good 

+G071 ....Return to Earth (1 meg) Space adventure 

*G072....Star Trek: Next generation Not as good as G005 

+G076— Star Fleet Addictive shoot 'em up 

G077 ....Seven Tiles Excellent speedball game from Alpha. 

+G081 ...Trek Trivia Test your Star Trek knowledge 

+G083 ....Wooden Ball (1 meg) Score three goals to win 

+G084....Wet Beaver Tennis Simple, but good fun bat S ball game 

+G086.... Wraithed One Good general knowledge quiz 

G098....Battleforce Control battle of robots 

G099 ....Cabaret Asteroids Best version yel. Recommended 

G101 ...Trucking On (2 disks, 2 drives) .Role-playing, attack company 
+G102....Simulation1 (1 meg)Recommended. 5 games including Metro 

+G103... .Mental Image One Gridrunner, Rebound, Rollerpede 

G108....Llamatron Geoff Minters shoot-'em-up 

+G109.... Wheel of Fortune TV Quiz, computerized 

G1 1 ....Lady Bug Similar to Pacman. Good stuff 

G1 15. ...Survivor Role-play an alien! Excellent 

G117,...Midnight Thief -.Addictive text adventure 

+G124 ....Napoleonic Warfare High-quality simulation 

G125.... Attic Attac Kill ghosts in house 

G126....Pom Pom Defind Pearl Harbour 

G129.. ..Stock Market Speculate at no risk! 

G130....Baltle Pong Table lennis game-good 

G135 ....No Mans Land (1 meg) 2 player shoot-'em-up 

•fG1 37 —Skate Tribe Skateboarding game 

+G143— Card Shop Well presented card games 

+G148— Galactic Food Fight Blow up those burgers 

*G149— Raphaels Revenge Difficult platform adventure 

+G151 .... Hmmmm That's not on the Syllabus AMOS adventure 

G1 52 —Leaping Larry Jump onto elevators 

+G1 53 —Growth - - Destroy an expanding brain 

G1 54 —Jet Man Classic Game 

+G155—MissionX Quality shoot-'em-up 

+G157— Quadrix Excellent tile puzzle 

+G165— Super Skoda Challenge Car racing game 

+G170 ...Amos Cricket 'Owzat 

+G171 ...Top Secret - Quality platform game 

+G175— Whizz Wall NEW Wizard shooting game 

+G1 76— White Knight NEW Excellent shoot-' em up game 



Blank disks 

10 for £4.99 
or 52p each 



CATALOGUE 

DISK 

75p each 



PQSTA6E 

UK orders 70p 

Europe £1.25 

World £2.50 



PRICES 

PD £1.25 per disk 

or 
£1 .00 each for 1 5 or more 



Send cheques or postal orders made payable to: 
SOFTWARE EXPRESSIONS, 

Unit 4, 44 Beauley Road, TEH" 

Southville, Bristol BS3 1 PY ■— 

Local orders welcome. Just phone in your order and pick up later! 

Tel: (0272) 639593 

9-5 Mon-Fri only 



PACKS 



ASSASSINS GAMES 

1-24 

+ COMPAT 

eso 



GAMES GALORE 
1-» 

£8.50 



BUSINESS PACK 

(6 DISKS) 

+ COMPAT 

65.50 



PUB 



N 



- 



continued from page 1 56 

novice or Class A amateur radio 
license or just for fun - you should 
seriously consider getting hold of this 
program. A couple of tweaks to the 
user interface would be nice, but all 
in all Morse Code Tutor can be 
thoroughly recommended. 
Value for money 9/10 



codes to classify each transaction 
and a range of printing options. 
There is also the ability to enter 
direct debits - amount, start date 
and frequency - which are then 
automatically entered at the correct 
times. 

For what seems like the eighth or 
ninth time since I started this column 



E 



Cfxr*cL Number: 



Total: 



Rntga Shopper 




38 Monnouth Street 



Bath 



Bfl1 2BM 



8225 442244 



Cliff Ranshau, Pep Ed 



Next 
_i f 



Prew 

-f f 



J 



Edit 

-J i— 



J 



Delete j 

— s — r I 



Amigadex is a simple, useful little address book program that does Just 
what it is designed for and no more - which makes a nice change in these 
days of overblown, over-featured mega-programs 



ACCOUNT MASTER 1.02 

Various PD libraries 

Account Master is yet another home 
accounts program. This one, about 
the seven thousandth to pass across 
my desk since I started using the 
Amiga, is written by Martin Piatt in 
AMOS - as, indeed, are many. 

Martin's effort is not the easiest 
to use that I've ever come across, 
although it does have some neat 
little touches that other programmers 
could do worse than copy. For 
instance, whenever a choice is 
selected which requires you to hit a 
button - for instance, when you 
select an entry you can hit Edit, 



"Those of us who 
just spend until the 

cashpoint stops 
working won't have 
any need for this 
program. 



n 



Delete or Cancel - small white bars 
appear above each of the active 
buttons. 

When you're first using a 
program, this can save loads of 
random clicking as you try to work 
out how to cancel the option that 
you've just inadvertently selected. 
And you may well find that you spend 
quite a lot of time doing just that; the 
program's interface can be a trifle 
tricky until you get the hang of it, 
although when you do it turns out to 
be quite powerful. 

All the usual features are 
present, including debits, credits, 



I'll say it: if you really want to do your 
home accounts on your Amiga, then 
this isn't a bad program to use. It 
seems to be perfectly capable of 
satisfying those out there who really 
find it necessary to track every 
penny in their bank 

l-aped . 0~ 



AMIGADEX 

PD Soft disk V757 

Ray Lambert's Amigadex Is a $20 
shareware program which, as you 
may have guessed, is an address 
book application. When launched, it 
appears as a window the same 
shape as a file index card, with 

buttons along the 
bottom for various 
options such as 
adding cards, 
browsing through 
data, printing and 
so on. There are 
seven data fields 
which can be used, 
labelled Name, 
Addressl through 
Address4, Phone 
and Comment. 
Each field displays 
48 characters (although they do 
horizontally scroll if you enter more 
than that), so it's clear that the 
program really is only intended as an 
address book, and not as a full flat- 
form database. 

The program allows you to import 
data from a text file, and will let you 
search for a specific card 

either by number or 
-jh by specifying 



Done 

_j s 




Map Editor 1.05 saves programmers 
time and trouble by allowing maps, 
which can be used as scrolling 
backgrounds, to be easily created 

accounts. Those of us 
who just spend until the 
cashpoint stops working won't, of 
course, have any need for the 
program. 

Martin tells me that he's sent 
the program to a number of PD 
houses, including PD Soft and UPD 
Distributors, so you shouldn't have 
any trouble getting hold of it. 

Oh, there are no screengrabs 
because it's written in AMOS and, as 
is often the case, it wouldn't co- 
operate with either of my 
screengrabbing utilities. 

Assuming that home accounts 
programs are the sort of thing that 
get you excited, I'd say that a fair 
rating for this one would be... 
Program rating 7/10 



The Minix 

demo provides a 

taster of the Minix operating 

system, In many ways similar to Unix 

text to search for. When 
printing, you can specify which fields 
should be output - although the little 
3D checkboxes are a pain, especially 
since the cursor that the program 
uses doesn't have any easily 
identifiable 'hot spot', which means 
that clicking on a check box is a 
somewhat trial-and-error affair. 

The beauty of Amigadex is that a 
click on a button on the right-hand 
side of the card iconifies it, and 
places its icon under your disk icons. 
So you can start the program via your 
startup-sequence, and have it 
available at all times. Double-clicking 
on the icon expands it to the full card 
size. 

The program can be set to open 



a specific card database when it's 
launched - this is done by editing its 
tool type, and is clearly described in 
the manual - or, if this isn't the 
case, you will be asked to find a 
cardfile via a standard requester. 
If you find yourself wanting a 
simple computer-based address 
book, but find that many of the 
currently available programs are too 
complex and involved, Amigadex 
could be the answer to your prayers. 
It's certainly worth checking out as 
an example of a small, elegant 
program designed for one job, which 
it does well. 
Program rating 9/10 

MAP EDITOR 1.05 

Amiganuts 

Map Editor, or MapEd, is a 
licenseware program by D Cherry, A 
Cserbakoi and R Burt-Frost. It is a 
map editor which allows you to 
create large images, or 'maps', from 
'tiles' - smaller, square pictures. 
Maps are useful in a variety of 
situations, primarily games, where a 
scrolling background often has many 
repeating features. In cases like 
these, using maps rather than 
attempting to create huge IFF files 
makes a great deal of sense - the 
amount of memory and disk space 
saved can be considerable. 

The instructions supplied with 
the program are comprehensive, and 
shouldn't cause any problems. There 
are full details on how to install the 
program on a hard disk or to run it 
from a floppy, and conversion 
programs which turn an IFF file into 
RAW data, and which can change a 
map's format into RAW or AMOS 
formats. 

Also on the disk are 
example 

(fragments 
'of C code 
/which show 
'how to load 
'and 

'manipulate a 
map in your own 
/ programs. 
And this, really, 
explains just what the program is for 
- it enables programmers to 
concentrate on the programming 
task itself, not re-inventing the wheel 
and having to spend weeks working 
out their own scrolling background 
routines. 

The Map Editor itself is easy to 
use. A couple of example maps - 
one a typical runway-style 
background and one a screenful of 
text - are included for you to play 
with, and it doesn't take long before 
you're relatively expert at 
manipulating tiles to create your own 
masterpieces. 

Map Editor is a neat, useful 

tontinued on poge 161 



58 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 




For a fast, reliable but foremost friendly service. 



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GA271 Solid Quad 

MUSIC 

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(2 to 6) 
MU025 Star Trekker 
MU055 Pro Tracker V2.00 
MU067Amlgadcns 
MU072Mozarts Flute 

Concerto 
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MU054EFX Music Creator 



GRAPHICS 

001 M-Cad 
003 Print Studio + 
005 Clip-Art 1 to 13 + 
Original set uncut 
024 Colour Fonts (5 dlsks)+ 
028 Walt Disney Clip-art+ 
033 Graphics Utlls + 

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SETS 

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SPD01 1 
SPD012 



Beginners I .(5 disks - £5.80) 
Beginners 2 15 disks - £5.80) 
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CUp-Art 2.(4 disks - £4.60) 
Games 1.(5 disks - £5.80) 
Games 2...I5 disks - £5.80) 
Clip-Art 3..(4 dlks - £4.60) 
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continued from page 158 

program and should find a place on 
any games or demo programmer's 
hard disk. 
Program rating 8/10 

MINIX DEMO 

PD Soft disk V711 
This disk is a demonstration version 
of the Minix operating system, which 
works in a similar way to Unix. Minix 
is available on the PC, ST, Amiga and 
Macintosh, and this demo version 
contains a subset of the commands, 
features and so on of the full version 
- which is sold by Prentice-Hall, and 
costs $169. 

The first problem that you're 
likely to encounter when trying to 
launch this program - which is on a 
self-booting disk - is that you will 
need to rename the disk to 'boot'. 
As supplied, the disk was called 
'Minix' - which results in a requester 
asking you to insert 'boot' before you 
can go any further. I was surprised at 
this - PD Soft is usually quite good 
about making sure that things like 



"the Minix demo... 

will give you some 

idea of what 

commercial 

programmers have 

to struggle with." 



disk names are correct, but this one 
clearly slipped through the net. 

Once the change was made, 
booting up produced a white-on-blue 
screen with the 'login:' prompt 
familiar to anyone who has used any 
sort of Unix in the past. Type 'root' 
(the name of the system superuser) 
and you're in. 

Ah! The joys of Unix. Editing 
password files using dreadful text 
editors. Typing commands like 'Is - 
als' to get a directory listing. These 
are the things that made a 
generation of programmers into 
uncommunicative, sad individuals - 
and now you can experience their 
frustration too. If you thought that 
the Shell was difficult to master, just 
try to get your mind around Minix'. 

To be fair, if you're using any 
flavour of Unix at the moment you 
won't find Minixtoo different. The full 
version is supplied with almost 200 
utility programs (the demo has 
around 25), including a vi clone and 
four other text editors, along with 
much of the source code for the 
system itself. This is because it 
doesn't contain any AT&T source 



code - it was written totally from 
scratch. The full system has a C 
compiler and supports comms 
software with the Kermit and 
ZModem protocols included. 

The manual provided, although 
necessarily a cut-down version of the 
real thing, isn't bad; you may 




Four Stroke Engine, by Michael 
Warren-Leighton, is an animation of 
an engine - dead useful when you're 
trying to explain how it works to 30 
screaming kids 

struggle if you've never used this 
type of operating system before, but 
anyone with a basic familiarity with 
Unix will soon feel very much at 
home. 



commercial programmers have to 

struggle with! 

Value for money 9/10 



ODDITIES 



It's been mentioned that I 
sometimes skip disks with smaller 
utilities on them, in favour of the 
more 'major' software 
offerings that I've been 
sent. For that reason, in 
the Oddities section I'll be 
ooking at disks which, 
because they contain 
things like animations, 
text files or tiny utilities, I 
wouldn't normally write 
about. 

FOUR STROKE 
ENGINE 

PD Soft disk V738 

This disk goes to show 
that something useful, or 
educational, doesn't need 
to be a massive and complex 
application. Four Stroke Engine 
simply displays an animation of such 
an engine, with a user-selectable 
engine speed (determined by hitting 
function keys Fl through F10). 

This is just one of a series of 
animations, called 'inside Info', 
which have been created by Michael 
Warren-Leighton, of Kent. As he says 



that he could be persuaded to 
consider creating one. 

The Four Stroke Engine is 
available from PD Soft; if you want to 
contact Michael directly, write to him 
at 7 Lea Vale, Crayford, Kent DAI 
4DL 
Program rating 8/10 

PRINTER DRIVERS V4.0 

PD Soft disk V724 

This disk contains a range of printer 
drivers, along with some separate 
Preferences programs for Canon 
printers which enable you to control 
additional options such as paper 
margin, timeout, grey scale 
conversion, custom tabs stops, 
default typeface and more. It also 
includes FontShop, a program by 
Wolf Faust which enables you to 
create fonts for downloading to your 
printer. 

The printer drivers included are 
for the following printers: 

• Canon BJ10 and BJ20 

• Canon BJ130 

• Canon BJ300 

• Star 9 Plus (Actually for any 9-pin 
Epson mode Star printers, this driver 
improves the speed of graphics 
dumps and offers more graphic 
resolutions than the EpsonX driver). 



CanonPref V1 . 81 (31 992 Wolf Faust 



Font Dounlosd 

Enable Eorn 

Custon Res-J£ 

Part 0| Disabled 



[9 



Custon ize Tabs. . . 



Saue 



Top Margin |9 | 
V I £erf oration Skip |B | 

I Paper Length |66 

Iineout |38 

| Job End PI No Signal | 

I 



If you've got one of 
these printers, and 
you're limping along 
with a standard 
Commodore driver like 
EpsonX. this disk is a 
must! 
Value for money.. .9/10 



fireyscate Conv. 



Use 



lance I 



PD Soft's Printer Drivers version 
The 4.0 has drivers for a range of 

demo different devices, as well as 

disk, ancillary programs to get the 

despite Des t f rom your printer 
being 
very 

limited in 
some 

respects (no 
C compiler 
means that you 
will be able to do 
very little, since 
almost all Minix PD 
utilities are provided in the form 
of source code), should at least give 
you a flavour of the full system. If 
you're doing a college course in Unix, 
you may find that Minix is close 
enough for you to use - and $169 is 
certainly cheaper than buying a Unix 
workstation to do your homework on! 

But even if you are just 
interested for interest's sake, the 
Minix demo disk is worth getting hold 
of - it will give you some idea of what 



LAST WILL 
&TESTAMENT 

PD Soft disk V706 

This disk contains a set 
of text files written by 
James Rose, a Canadian, along 



WILL PH'l 



elections wllh 
ihe shal 1 deer, 
[fl (h* lii.i.l It, 
specifically. 

(SMSrfS IS 

aside or pay 
uhol ly or In 
tin) tin* or n 

s f * . i" 9 * a *i?* 

•-I..-.I I , i ii !■(.«■ 

P5tns or any 
such division 
dec lilon ahat . 
i one or tied. In 
B-tjto, I diro 

b.,..ii o) 

according to 
opinion, the 



power to make at I such elections aa lie or i 
\n fil* or her absolute discretion to be ij 
lercsts of no estate as a whole, and ii 

I'ltlOII 

nil the 



ca.jfi 

To pake any divi-.m. 
"V share or Interest 
r-t, in the assets? 
— *"-- - * fhe.t 



n of ny estate or set ii 
lC — eln, e ither il 



.„„: ii 



death or at the tine of such division. 2 
or p.-tynent, and I declare that ny trustees ii 
r absolute discretion, r«« ttie value of ny 2 
par* thereof for the purpose of nuking any fl 

setting aside or pavnent, and (heir Jj 

be final and binding upon all persons ,u 
f ixiny the value of the assets of ny il 
ct ny Trustee to keep an even hand and I ij 

take into account not only fair narket iJ 
• I property but also Its adjusted cost •: 



To.nake a distribution of .assets JJ 
he itens of this ny Mill If. in their jj 

is no further Ta6l I itv.for anv taxes il 
ev have not obtained a clearance. My jj 
If they consider it advisable, nake any if 
ion. and as a condition lor so doing shaTl it 



luc'h'dTst^oGti-... 

have the right to ask for and receive algiied ■! . „ 

mdennl I leaf Ion Iron the beneficiaries to uhom anv such il 

-rtL>t r .ilu.t-Lvpa-«c.«-»a d a II . . 



If the party of the first part... Last Will and Testament, PD Soft disk V706, 
should make fun bed time reading 



in his 'about' screen, 
"Whilst for the sake of clarity it is not 
possible to show the intricate 
workings of complex machines, 
[these animations) should serve to 
illustrate the basic principles." And 
they do. If you've got a class of kids 
that you've got to teach on subjects 
like this, it would be well worth 
seeing if Michael has done a relevant 
animation. And if he hasn't, I'm sure 



with QED, a text editor by Darren 
Greenwald, to edit them. And, yes, 
the text files are all blank wills, for 
you to cheerfully fill in and file away 
nice and safely for the time when you 
pop your clogs and your relatives all 
get to fight over who gets the carpet 
in the living room. 

The documents were originally 
created on a PC, but they have now 
been converted for the edification of 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 19 • NOVEMBER 1992 



WBMJJgjWAIN 



the Amiga community. 

There are 14 complete wills on 
the disk, along with a codicil, a cover 
page, an affidavit of execution for 
your will witnesses and a form for 



cover just about every possible 
eventuality, and the descriptions are 
almost as tortuous as the actual 
legal wording of the will. For 
instance, here's the description of 



VirusZ Preferences 



j/J Audible & Visible fllarn 
_yj Check Resident Vectors 
_VJ Check Menory For Viruses 



| Install Faked SnoopDos 

(Report Custon Bootb locks 

.•J Detect Disk Changes 
Menory & Vector Check Repeat Delay (5 to 128 seconds) 
I Check Crunched Files | Skip Subdirectories 



19 



Use 



Save 



VirusZ- just one of the very handy anti-virus programs on Software 
Expressions disk U155 



power of attorney. 

James is, apparently, an 
authority on this subject, and has 
even lectured on it. (He lectures on 
wills? My, that must be 
interesting...) He has also, according 
to the documentation, "made wills 
for many, many people." We all have 



one of the wills, as found in the 
documentation file: 

"Will by wife leaving everything to 
her husband, and since the couple 
have no children, if the husband dies 
before the wife leaving everything, in 
equal parts, to the brothers and 
sisters of the husband and wife, and 

£HS5 




Icon Mania contains, among other things, tons of icons for you to assign to 
your own programs and files 



to make our money somehow, I 
suppose... 

Although the law of different 
countries means that the actual 
format and wording of a will varies 
depending on where it is written, 
James says that he's tried to word 
the wills on the disk so that they can 
be used in "most all areas." 

The wills themselves seem to 



if one of the brothers and sisters 
dies before the death of the 
husband, the share of that brother or 
sister will go to his or her children, 
and if there are no such children 
then that share will be equally 
divided between the living brothers 
and sisters." 

Simple, really... 

If you want to use any of the pre- 



DISK MAGAZINES 



DEADLOCK 

Issue 3 

The first disk magazine this month 
was created by four Amiga coding 
groups: The Guru Masters, Metanoia, 
Prodigy and Dimension-X. Together, 
they call themselves Rapier 
International. 

The magazine is certainly one of 
the better-looking ones that I've 
seen. It has a well-designed 



interface, and the music isn't at all 
bad (although, contrary to the 
instructions, I couldn't turn it off). 
There is no PD on the disk; it 
consists totally of articles written by 
the coders themselves and anyone 
else who wants to write in. 

I still have reservations about 
some of the content - bad language, 
off-colour jokes and the like. 
However, I thought I'd mention it this 



prepared wills you must pay a 
registration fee of $10, or $25 if you 
want to take advantage of reduced 
rate consultations and other goodies 
with the good Mr Rose. 

It almost seems 
easier to die 
intestate... 
Value for money 
(assuming the party 
of the first second 
agrees that the 
party of the first 
part, having 
reviewed this 
program, is 
competent so to do, 
and that the content 
of the disk Is 
actually required by 
the party of the second part, after 
which let's all go and have a party 
to recover) 8/10 



Cancel 



is a small price to pay for peace of 
mind. 

The disk is auto-booting, and 
brings up a menu of six different anti- 
virus programs. There is also the 
documentation file for each program, 
and an introduction to viruses written 
by Brains him- (or her-) self. And 
that's about it, really. The programs 
on the disk (which include Soot X, 
Virus Z and Virus Checker) seem to 
cover everything, and Brains claims 
that the disk detects every existing 
virus which has been released up 
until the disk's creation date. Get it 
now. 
Value for money 10/10 

ICON MANIA 

PD Soft disk V730 

Icon Mania is a disk which should 
satisfy anyone with a burning desire 
to customise every icon within reach. 




OSWALDblack 



These are three of the CompuGraphic fonts supplied on PD Soft disk V713 
(being used in a PageSetter document). They are good quality, and should 
certainly be considered if you do any DTP work 



ANTI-VIRUS 6.04 

Software Expressions disk U155 

Every Amiga user should have some 
anti-viral tools at hand - the Amiga 
has more viruses than most other 
computers, and new ones seem to 
appear almost daily. Anti-Virus is a 
disk compiled by someone called 
Brains, who claims to update it on a 
weekly basis. Of course, if you don't 
receive many disks from outside your 
own work environment, you won't 
need to update your anti-virus 
software quite so often, but it's still 
worth being as up-to-date as possible 
- and the £1.50 that this disk costs 

month - especially since there's a 
piece in it complaining that I 
criticised it a couple of issues ago! 
Yes, guys, I still think that you don't 
need poor jokes and four-letter words 
all over the place, but the inclusion 
of some well-written and interesting 
articles on subjects like music, 
modem reviews, coding tutorials and 
the like make this mag more 
worthwhile. 

The serious pieces are (for the 
most part) well-written and well 
thought-out; some wouldn't be out of 
place in a magazine like Amiga 
Shopper. 

If you want an interesting and 



It contains a large number of 
different icons which you can use in 
place of your normal boring ones. In 
addition, there are some programs 
which will ease the creation and use 
of your own. 

The separate programs include 
Icon Maker, which converts icons 
into IFF files, so that you can edit 
them in programs such as DPaint, 
and converts IFF files into icons, so 
that once you've edited an image you 
can actually use it; IconiZer. which 
lets you choose different pointers at 

continued on page 1 64 

relatively entertaining read, and 
assuming that you won't be offended 
by four-letter words, you could do 
worse than check out Deadlock. 

The magazine is available from 
Guru Masters HQ, 111 Sherborne 
Road, Bushbury, Wolverhampton, 
West Midlands WV10 9EU. Enclose a 
blank disk and an SAE with adequate 
postage. The disk is public domain, 
so it can be passed around but not 
sold - which means that you 
shouldn't be able